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The following are the statuses of new businesses and development coming to Emmitsburg from the town planner’s report:

Federal Stone (Creamery Road, east side of U.S. 15) — A preconstruction meeting is pending. Zoning permit was issued on August 23.

Village Liquors & Plaza Inn (Silo Hill Parkway) — A preconstruction meeting is pending.

Seton Shrine Museum Entrance (South Seton Avenue) — The deed of easement is pending. A zoning permit was issued on August 17.

Tenant Fit-out for Daughters of Charity Ministries (South Seton Avenue) — A zoning permit was issued on August 21.

Mount St. Mary’s University School of Health Professions (South Seton Avenue) — A zoning permit was issued on August 21.

The following are the statuses of new businesses and development coming to Emmitsburg from the town planner’s report:

Federal Stone (Creamery Road, east side of U.S. 15) — A preconstruction meeting is pending. Zoning permit was issued on August 23.

Village Liquors & Plaza Inn (Silo Hill Parkway) — A preconstruction meeting is pending.

Seton Shrine Museum Entrance (South Seton Avenue) — The deed of easement is pending. A zoning permit was issued on August 17.

Tenant Fit-out for Daughters of Charity Ministries (South Seton Avenue) — A zoning permit was issued on August 21.

Mount St. Mary’s University School of Health Professions (South Seton Avenue) — A zoning permit was issued on August 21.

The U.S. Postal Service is observing the 20th anniversary of the Postmaster General Heroes’ Program, which was created in 2003 to commend USPS employees who go above and beyond the call of duty in a variety of situations, such as assisting lost children, getting help for sick or injured customers, spotting fires, and more.

Around 5,500 individuals, known as PMG heroes, have been recognized through the program, which reflects a simple, yet powerful, idea: Because they know the habits of their customers and the rhythms of their communities, Postal Service employees are often the first to notify emergency personnel and render aid when something is wrong.

Delivering mail 365 days over the 20 years of the PMG Heroes’ program would equate to 7,300 heroes if we were to recognize a hero everyday. However, all our heroes are not recognized because of their humility, and often after assisting a member of their community, they continue their route without saying a word.

Most recently in Washington, D.C., letter carrier Donald Proctor saved a customer from choking. After dislodging a piece of cheese using the Heimlich maneuver and saving this customer’s life, he continued delivering mail and finished his day without sharing the story. It wasn’t until one month later the customer felt compelled and wrote a letter to the station manager, sharing the heroic story. They were reunited during a local PMG Hero event, and she was able to thank her “angel,” her new name for him.

This is one of many untold stories of everyday heroes at the Postal Service. 

Today, potential PMG heroes are nominated by postal colleagues. After approved nominees receive a commendation letter from Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, they are featured in the “Heroes’ Corner” column on Link, the organization’s national employee news site, where it has become a popular mainstay. In 2020, “Heroes’ Corner” received a national award for excellence in employee communications.

But to be nominated, they need to hear from you, our customers, our neighborhoods, and our livelihood.

If you know of a PMG Hero, please contact your local post office and share your story.

To learn more, the PMG heroes’ stories are archived at link.usps.com/heroes to illustrate how Postal Service employees do so much more for their communities than deliver mail.

Geraldine Otremba, Cascade Resident

On August 2, the Washington County Zoning Board voted 4-1 to approve a new Dollar General Market that has been hotly opposed by local residents for two years as not in character with the unincorporated community’s rural setting. The applicant seeking a “special exception,” Outdoor Contractors Inc., has been seeking the exception to construct the store in what is recognized as a rural village zone.

The zoning board’s authority to grant an exception rests on the criterion of compatibility with the surrounding neighborhood. Special exceptions allowed include B&B’s, farm stands, and grocery stores. Cascade residents opposed to adding another Dollar General in Cascade filled the hearing room (three Dollar General stores are nearby in Blue Ridge Summit, and Wayne Heights, PA, and Emmitsburg, MD) and rallied around the town’s long-established grocery store, Sanders Market, which has provided fresh meat, produce, deli, and a full array of products for 60 years.

The zoning board first approved a special exception for the proposed Dollar General in May of last year. Cascade residents appealed the decision to the Washington County Circuit Court, which sent the appeal back to the Zoning Board to re-consider the request as a single special exception use.

The zoning board heard presentations from Outdoor Contractors and opponents of the project.

One resident testified in support of the exception, based on the allegation that the proposed Dollar General was “functionally similar” to a grocery store. Residents from Cascade, Sabillasville, Frederick, Hagerstown, Blue Ridge Summit, and Waynesboro testified in opposition to the exception, citing Dollar General’s own legal and financial filings describing the business as a general merchandise entity.

Opponents also offered first-hand recent photographs from in-person visits to existing Dollar General Markets, highlighting limited grocery offerings and moldy produce. Much of the discussion among the members of the zoning board focused on what is a common understanding of a grocery store. In the end, Board Member Tim Ammons appeared persuaded by an undated, unidentified photo of grocery shelves and voted with chairs, Jay Miller, Marvin Gower, and Bob Meyers to approve the exception. The local opponents through their attorney have said a further appeal is likely

The following are the statuses of new businesses and development coming to Emmitsburg from the town planner’s report:

Federal Stone (Creamery Road, east side of U.S. 15) — Performance bonds and tap fees are pending.

Village Liquors & Plaza Inn (Silo Hill Parkway) — A preconstruction meeting is pending.

Seton Shrine Museum Entrance (South Seton Avenue) — The deed of easement, county approval, and signatures from town representatives are pending.

Tenant Fit-out for Daughters of Charity Ministries (South Seton Avenue) — This project is under review, and a county building permit is pending.

Mount St. Mary’s University School of Health Professions (South Seton Avenue) — This project is under review. A zoning certificate and county building permit are pending.

On the former Fort Ritchie military base in Cascade, the Fort Ritchie Museum continues to collect historical memorabilia. Those who may have historical items or information to donate to the collection may contact Landon Grove at the Fort Ritchie offices in the old firehouse onsite.

In December, Meritus Health opened the first and only primary care clinic in the community and expanded to full-time hours for all ages in June.

Mountain Top Ice Cream Shop is open behind the firehouse on weekends through October. 

Flat Top Salon and Suites at 14310 Castle Drive is now open and houses several businesses including Winsome Woods, Orchid Oasis Day Spa, The Kera Studio, Radiant Artistry, and Chemically Lavish. A ribbon cutting will be held on August 4 at 10:00 a.m. to introduce these businesses that offer a various spa treatments, massage, sound healing, and beauty services. The Tap Room and Artisan Village are slated to open this fall! Stop by Fort Ritchie and check them out!

Courtesy Photos

Meritus Health ribbon-cutting in June.

Mount Saint Mary’s University (MSMU) has announced the hiring of a new athletics director, replacing retired Athletics Director Lynne Robinson.  Robinson’s retirement was effective in August. Hired as the new director was Brad Davis, whose term began effective in August.

University President Timothy Trainor said, “We enthusiastically welcome Brad and his family to Mount St. Mary’s,” adding,  “As we enter our second year in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference, we look forward to his leadership and collaboration with our excellent coaches and staff in positively developing our student-athletes in mind, body, and spirit, as well as in building on our winning tradition.”

Davis was hired by the Mount following a successful five-year tenure at Mercyhurst University in Erie, according to MSMU Assistant Sports Information Director Matt McCann, further noting, “The Mercyhurst ‘Lakers’ boast a similar-sized department to the Mount, with 26 varsity programs and 750 student-athletes.”

Davis said, “I am honored and humbled to be named the next athletic director at Mount St. Mary’s. The Mount is a special place with special people and plenty of potential.”

He further stated, “There is tremendous energy and excitement throughout campus, and I am ecstatic to join President Trainor’s leadership team and meet the Mount faithful. I was impressed with President Trainor’s vision immediately, and I look forward to working with our student-athletes, coaches, and staff to achieve success together.”

The five years Davis supervised Mercyhurst were transformative. Rebuilding the Lakers’ structure, mission, and culture, administrative and head coaching hires helped Mercyhurst attain the top spot in the Pennsylvania States Athletic Conference (PSAC) for promoting diversity in 2021-22. Teams recorded a department-wide GPA of 3.4 with a 90 percent Academic Success Rate in six out of seven years, according to McCann.

Mercyhurst President Kathleen Getz stated, “Brad arrived at Mercyhurst five years ago with vision, passion, and experience to elevate Laker Athletics to the next level,” adding, “He has been an asset to Mercyhurst, enhancing our athletics programs and facilities, while being thoroughly dedicated to our student-athletes and to the integrity of our university.”

Getz said, “We are grateful for his contributions to Mercyhurst, and we wish Brad, his wife Kristin, and their son Brecken all the best as they embark on a new chapter in their lives.”

Jeremy Gibson, director of Athletics, Merrimack College, stated, “Mount Saint Mary’s has made a great decision in naming Brad Davis to lead its athletic programs. Brad was an outstanding colleague at Merrimack College and made a meaningful impact at Mercyhurst. I am certain he will enjoy similar successes at the Mount.”

Gary Manchel, head Men’s Basketball coach, Mercyhurst University, stated, “Mount Saint Mary’s University made a fantastic choice with Brad Davis. Brad is a leader with great vision, who not only wants to win the right way but also enable all student-athletes to have the experiences they deserve. He is a person who represents the best values between education and athletics. Coaches will truly enjoy working with Brad while competing for championships.”

In addition to duties at Mercyhurst, Davis serves as chair of the Atlantic Hockey Executive Committee and the PSAC Executive Committee. Past committee assignments include chairing the Division II National Advisory Committee for Men’s Lacrosse as well as the PSAC Advisory Council and PSAC Officiating Committee, according to McCann.

Before his time in Erie, Davis served at Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts for 11 years. Beginning as the sports information director in 2007, he was promoted to Assistant Athletic Director for External Relations in 2011, and again to Associate Director of Athletics one year later.

Regarding Athletics Director Robinson’s retirement, Davis said, “I would be remiss without recognizing Lynne Robinson, who has served the Mount for 42 years,” further stating, “The Phelan family is synonymous with the Mount, and I know there are big shoes to fill. I’m grateful to Lynne for her help and support during the transition.”

Joan Bittner Fry

In the early 1950s, there was a dance hall/restaurant in Sabillasville. My parents, Harold and Helen Bittner, owned it.  Previously, it had been a salvage yard owned by Buck Wierman and is now a church. Do you recall hearing about it?

The deed was transferred from Leroy A. Wierman to Harold A. Bittner on August 23, 1949. The restaurant and dance hall operated from 1950 to 1953. I believe milkshakes and sandwiches were 50 cents, soda was 5 cents, and soup was a quarter.

The Bend (so named because it was within the Western Maryland RR’s Horseshoe Bend in Sabillasville) was opened to give the young people of the community a place to gather. On Friday nights from 9:00 p.m. to midnight, dances were held with country bands such as The Carroll County Ramblers, Joe Phillips, the Young Brothers (Mehrle being one of the brothers), and The Sunnyside Ramblers. Some band members I can recall were Les Sanders (banjo), Glenn Wolfe (drums and spoons), Harland Benchoff, Larry Harbaugh (fiddle, and his memorable rendition of “The Orange Blossom Special”), Carroll Harbaugh (bass fiddle), and Jim and Jimmy Lynn (guitars). In the beginning, the band was paid $5.00; increasing to $15.00; then to $20.00, and then to $25.00. Those fellows sure didn’t play for three hours for the money!

For the Friday night dance, my late sister, Barbara, and I would make a supply of tickets each week. They were whatever we could dream up, and each had to have a punched hole with a string. Patrons were not to go outside during the evening. My mother was always on watch to be sure if you did go out, you had your own ticket when you returned. We would decorate with crepe paper streamers, which would sag as the evening warmed up. Sometimes, there was an abundance of dance wax on the hardwood floor.

I remember it well. This is where I learned to dance: Jitterbug, two-step, slow dance, Paul Jones—we did it all. Of course, I wasn’t even a teenager at the time, so I believe I was tolerated. There were some Filipino sailors stationed at Camp David at the time who could really dance. I loved it when I could dance with them. I wonder now what they thought. They seemed to enjoy our country shindigs because they were there often.

Some of the first recordings of attendance at the Friday night dances were 35, 29, 41, 62, 62, 67, 76, 78, 88, 83, 75, 94, 86, 73, 54, 80, 75, 108, 114, 84, 100, 126, 114, 118, 94, 105, 125, 122, 111, 94, 104, 84, and 119.

By the time the coin-operated amusement devices tax, the trader’s tax, the restaurant tax, the jukebox tax, and the cigarette tax were all taken care of, there was little to no profit; but as I said before, it was for the young people of the community. Soon, many of the local young men went into the service. This had an effect on the attendance at the dances and, in 1953, the business was closed. 

All I have left are memories and a table and a back bench from one of the booths. It was quite an era!

Photo by Blair Garrett

Tickets and cards from The Bend. 

10Tavern is a new business in Thurmont, located at 10 E. Main Street. The owners, Scott Austin and The Golf Group, purchased the former Thurmont Bar and Grill that had been in that location for nearly 40 years. They have rehabbed the entire facility on the inside and out to create a really “cool” place. They also hired an executive chef, Ray Taylor, who also serves as the general manager.

In 2010, the Golf Group opened Structural Systems and then purchased Hobb’s Hardware in Thurmont. Thurmont’s Commissioners and Economic Development Director Vickie Grinder are excited for additional shops and restaurants to select Thurmont as their business location, with the goal of making Thurmont a destination town.

Visit www.tentavern.com for more information about the restaurant and peruse the menu.

Deb Abraham Spalding

Part 3: It’s All In What You Believe

As I fumbled along my healing path under the direction of Dr. Lo, I experienced massive improvements in digestion and relief of pain, as well as some weight loss.

Dr. Lo focuses on four main areas to help people: Nutritional Response Testing (NRT), chiropractic care, allergy screening and testing, and detox. At first, I thought Dr. Lo coached his patients through each quadrant of treatments, but I was incorrect. Simply put, if the client does not need a treatment, the client doesn’t get it. 

As you may recall from last month’s article, I believed I needed chiropractic care. Afterall, I had received chiropractic care over the course of more than 20 years. Sometimes, I was seeking help several times a week.

It was a shock to learn from Dr. Lo that I didn’t need chiropractic, as long as I was not eating the things that triggered the spasm that ignited the nerves responsible for the back pain. Now, understanding this, I no longer believe I need chiropractic. I am not in pain.

Recently, I talked to a man named Skeeter who shared his path to healing with me. Skeeter sought the help of a fourth-generation acupuncturist in Frederick for vertigo and sciatica. Skeeter explained, “They’re the first [the acupuncturists], after five doctors, who helped me.” He added, “They take my insurance, so why not try it!”

Skeeter had problems with vertigo, sciatica, limitation of movement in his hands after hand and wrist surgery, and joint pain associated with Lyme Disease. The acupuncture helped the vertigo after two treatments. Then, the acupuncturist started on the sciatica. Like Dr. Lo, this doctor was working through the issues.

Skeeter had acupuncture treatments twice a week for three weeks, then once a week for another three weeks, and, now, after four months of treatments, he only goes once a month. The doctor performed acupuncture on each joint in his hands. Before, Skeeter “couldn’t pick up a quarter.” Now, Skeeter can make a fist and pick up all the change he wants—“even dimes!”

He had Lyme Disease that was causing joint pain from “dry joints.” Since receiving the acupuncture, he has had more tests for Lyme and now has only two out of five bands in the Lyme test. 

Skeeter’s symptoms and pains are less severe than ever. The sciatica and vertigo are 85-90 percent gone.

As much as I have been preaching nutrition, nutrition, nutrition with Dr. Lo’s NRT program, Skeeter hasn’t changed his diet at all with acupuncture. He said, “Unlike normal medicine where you take a pill and your headache goes away for a while, acupuncture helps long term.” Most importantly, Skeeter claims, “If you believe in the treatment, believe it will help you, then it will help.”

Skeeter’s acupuncturist was recommended to him by a western medicine doctor. “It’s helped a lot. I recommend it to anybody.”

Compared to my path where eating certain things are linked to various pains, Skeeter hasn’t changed his way of eating at all. Skeeter said, “It all depends on what you believe.” The acupuncture is really working for Skeeter. I can’t help but to believe Skeeter.

What is the path to health? Dr. Lo has several. He’s an excellent doctor. Skeeter’s acupuncture doctor also has a path to health. I think the reason for writing these articles has been to show all of our readers that going to a traditional doctor and taking pills isn’t the only way. As a matter of fact, those pills sometimes cause more problems that need more pills. It’s a crazy cycle. Maybe there’s a different path for you. We’ve told you about two options here. 

Please note, I named Dr. Lo because he’s a columnist and advertiser on our Banner Team. I didn’t name the acupuncturist because he’s not an advertiser or writer for this newzine.

I wish you the very best on your path to health.

Example of how far Skeeter could close a fist before (left) and after (right) acupuncture.

Photos by Deb Abraham Spalding

Deb Abraham Spalding

While traveling through Thurmont to look at real estate, Greg Elliott and Nina Tate-Elliott noticed the commercial space for sale at 21 East Main Street.

Their search for their new home took them to see many houses, but they were drawn back to that first house they looked at in Jimtown and the commercial space on East Main Street in Thurmont. Why Thurmont?

Nina shared, “To be totally honest, we kept coming back to that house.” The first house became THE house for Greg and Nina and the Elliotts officially opened Studio 24E with a ribbon cutting on June 24, 2023.

Greg and Nina began their journey in retail with customer service and design being the main focus. Studio 24E originated in a white cape cod residential-style building in Linthicum, Maryland, in 2001. There, the foundation was forged with a base of custom framing, and a very loyal customer following emerged and still continues today.

Slowly, new selections were added in the form of jewelry and home departments. Eventually, the Elliotts outgrew this location and, in 2005, the move was made to Oakland, Maryland, with a second location soon opening at the Wisp Resort at Deep Creek Lake. Today, all of those locations have been closed and consolidated to Thurmont.

Nina calls Studio 24E a “lifestyle store,” where the customer can purchase everything needed to create a fashionable lifestyle. Customers of all ages will notice a broad range of price points in home décor, fashion lines of clothing and accessories, fragrances for the home and body, footwear, holiday merchandise, and gifts for any occasion. Nina provides event make-up (cosmetics) services and/or make-up tutorials. Nina has been a make-up artist for close to 30 years, working for brands MAC Cosmetics and Laura Mercier.

The store’s ever-changing inventory captures your daily busy lifestyle. Carrying brands like Simply Southern, The Sak Onesole the Original Interchangeable shoe and OkaB Shoes makes it easy to accomplish.

Jewelry by famed designer Rodrigo Otazu, or Angelique de Paris, or Wind & Fire bracelets.

Our designer sunglass selection is unmatched from Tom Ford, to Versace MCM, Chloe, and more. You’ll love the great selection of Puppie Love T-shirts, as well as Maryland My Maryland tees.

Need a quick gift? Select from Aromatique home fragrance Thompson Ferrier or our Tussie Mussies bath & Body line, Mixologie Fragrance, Annalee, Old World Christmas, or from our many gift selections.

Don’t forget that quality custom framing is also available. Take a look! Visit Studio 24E at 21 E. Main Street in Thurmont or visit their website at www.studio24e.com online to shop. Call 443-679-7916 for more information.

Thurmont Town Commissioners and staff welcomed Nina Tate-Elliott and Greg Elliott  of Studio 24E to Thurmont with a ribbon cutting on June 24, 2023.

Courtesy Photo

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Emmitsburg New Business and Development Briefs

The following are the statuses of new businesses and development coming to Emmitsburg from the town planner’s report:

Federal Stone (Creamery Road, east side of U.S. 15) — Site plan and improvement plans are complete. Performance bond estimates are being reviewed.

Village Liquors & Plaza Inn (Silo Hill Parkway) — SCD approved the improvement plat. The site plan has been submitted to the county. Payment and performance bonds are pending.

Mount St. Mary’s Seton Shrine E Wing (South Seton Avenue) — The site plan was received on May 26 and is under review.

Thurmont New Business and Development Briefs

The statuses of new businesses and development coming to Thurmont:

Subdivisions

Emmitsburg Road Flood Control Project (behind Sheetz) — The Town of Thurmont acquired 0.9 ac in the general business zone has been conditionally approved.

Hammaker Hills, Phase 1 (Woodland Avenue) — 36 single-family lots recorded and 22 permits issued for single-family dwellings.

Hammaker Hills, Phase 2 (Westview Drive) — Preliminary plat approved for 22 single-family lots in R-2 district. The improvement plan is conditionally approved.

Mechanicstown, LLC (Emmitsburg Road) — Preliminary plat approved for 31 single-family lots in R-2/ ARP district. Improvement Plans are anticipated for the Aug. 24 Planning and Zoning Commission agenda.

Mountain Brooke (Emmitsburg Road) — Preliminary plat approved for 11 single-family lots in R-2/ ARP district. Improvement Plans are anticipated for the Aug. 24 Planning and Zoning Commission agenda.

Site Plans

Thurmont Business Park (Thurmont Blvd.): Lot 1 to be developed for the relocation of Goodwill into a 17,850-square-foot building; under county review.

New Businesses

Studio 24E, a lady’s boutique, is now open at 21 East Main Street.

Deb Abraham Spalding

Part 2: Consistency Is Key

As you may have read in last month’s edition, I wrote that I have found my path to healing with Dr. Lo’s Nutritional Response Testing at The Nutritional Healing Center in Frederick. 

When I wrote last month’s article, I had completed six visits with Dr. Lo and had learned that my health revival was simply learning to open my body’s energy pathways with proper nutrition.

Dr. Lo had declared, “You’re blocked!” at every appointment except that sixth appointment.

Leaving that appointment, I incorrectly felt that I had mastered the process since I was not blocked anymore. I thought I was healed! I had achieved the coveted “Unblocked” status! 

While that should have meant that I now knew how to eat properly, how to avoid things my body did not like, and how to avoid or minimize ingestion and exposure to toxins, in my brain, I was telling myself that I had “been there and done that!” Subconsciously, I thought I had achieved the outcome, so now I could go back to my old ways of eating.

And I did! I went right back to ingesting the stuff I knew I shouldn’t, including having some alcoholic beverages that are true poison to my body. I also assumed that the next step in the process at Dr. Lo’s office was chiropractic care. After all, chiropractic adjustments are important to keep our energy pathways open, right?

At my seventh appointment, much to my dismay, Dr. Lo said, “You’re blocked.” Then, he told me that I DID NOT NEED a chiropractic adjustment.

What? That surprised me. After all, I had been seeking chiropractic adjustments for my back pain for years. I just assumed I would start a chiropractic “section” of the program. Turns out, there isn’t a chiropractic “section” or progression.

Achieving the unblocked status wasn’t like the sun shining brightly after a rough storm, it was the sun peeping out for a millisecond during the rough storm. What a tease!

 And I soon learned that if I don’t need chiropractic (Dr. Lo asks my body, and it answers via Nutritional Response Testing), then I don’t get chiropractic. The root of my back pain is a spasm in my gut that is triggering nerves that trick me into thinking I need chiropractic adjustments.

Now, when you break it down, this whole health game is really simple, and I now see how to do it.

It’s simply DOING IT!

The path to healing is a constant process. I still see all those ads for “magic pills.” I still see the one-plan-fits-all exercise program or diet shake. The truth is: There is no magic, quick fix—consistency is key.

It really IS simple: eat the right foods, move your body, and avoid toxins.

Don’t forget these truths for overall health: (1) Dr. Lo showed me that there’s a nutritional component (eating foods my body doesn’t like) or an emotional component (fear, anxiety, anger, guilt…) that’s at the root of pain (in most cases); (2) My sciatic back pain that I’ve been tolerating and seeking chiropractic help for over the past 20 years is GONE (unless I eat the crap and poisons); (3) I’m now at 7 visits through my 12-visit program with Dr. Lo and my ailments like gut discomfort, joint aches, swollen ankles, and more—are gone… unless I eat the foods my body does not like!

Hallelujah! But I’m still working on it…and will continue to each and every day.

Dr. Lo is shown in his office where he meets with clients.

Deb Abraham Spalding

Thurmont’s Jeff Barber enjoys playing. After all, he owns Playground Specialists, Inc., a playground design and installation company in Thurmont. But did you know that he also enjoys playing golf? He enjoys golf so much that, in January, he bought the local Maple Run Golf Club.

Barber was a frequent customer at Maple Run when he learned from the former owners that they wanted to sell. He felt, “It would be a great project to fix it up.”

Maple Run provides 18 holes of golf (par 72) on a very challenging course where golfers of all skill levels will appreciate the beautiful mountain views as they travel the cart path through the course that meanders around two streams. Two-hundred-year-old stone fences remind the golfers of the agricultural roots of the two original farms upon which the course was built. 

“People wondered if I was going to develop the property after I bought it,” Barber said. In fact, his intentions were “quite the opposite.” Barber has reinvested and completed a “tremendous amount of work.” He feels that “people who haven’t played golf [at Maple Run] yet this year won’t even recognize the place.” 

Golfers will notice major changes, including a new picnic area, new siding on the club house, new signage, new picnic tables, new fencing, new parking areas, ten new golf carts, renovated greens, renovated tee boxes, two new bridges, every cart path repaved, a renovated snack bar (with a concessions drive-up window), a club house with new furnishings inside, and major cleanup completed all around.

Staff at the golf course include new superintendent Troy Brawner, Mark Hahn as the general manager, Erin Bauer in the snack bar, and Bob O’Donnell at registration, along with many high school students and other retired community members working part-time.

The club house now offers expanded beverage options, including beer, wine, liquor, shots, Black Rifle Coffee, cold coffees, energy drinks, soda, and the notorious Hot Dog Special on Tuesdays (free hot dog and a drink from the club house when playing a round of golf).

Food trucks will be onsite every weekend, and the beverage cart will be rolling around the course on busy days. 

The stone Moser Manor house will soon be visible from the outside, with picnic areas and an arbor around the house. The 1700’s bank barn that hole No. 3 plays around is being repaired. It is Barber’s intention to keep Maple Run’s history—from previous owner Jeff Ellis and the Moser families who originally built the course—alive. 

Barber said he feels the golf course is very important to the Town of Thurmont, “If we lose it, we’ll never have one again because they are so costly to build and require so much land.” He added, “It’s one of those things that I don’t want to see the Town of Thurmont lose.”

He assures us, “…as long as I’m alive and running it, I want it to remain as a golf course, and I want it to be a place where the town of Thurmont community can come out and enjoy the game of golf and some drinks and food trucks on the weekend!”

Maple Run Golf Club in Thurmont is located at 99 Golf Course Lane. For more information, visit www.maplerungolf.com and call 301-271-7870 for your tee time. 

Barber claims, “We’ve only scratched the surface on what we want to do with this golf course. Follow us on social media, or better yet, come out and play regularly. Everybody will actually see improvements every single time they come.”

Jeff Barber and Erin Bauer are shown in the snack bar.

MSM Club Baseball at Maple Run.

Pictured are Mark Hahn and Troy Brawner.

Many upgrades and renovations have been completed at Maple Run, including signage and cart paths.

Photos by Deb Abraham Spalding

The following are the statuses of new businesses and development coming to Emmitsburg from the town planner’s report:

Federal Stone (Creamery Road, east side of U.S. 15) — Awaiting the submission of an updated site plan and improvement plans. Payment and Performance bonds are also being reviewed.

Village Liquors & Plaza Inn (Silo Hill Parkway) — Owner has received conditional approval of the site plan and improvement plat and is now seeking to have stormwater management and soil conservation plans approved by the county.

Mount St. Mary’s Seton Shrine E Wing (South Seton Avenue) — Renovations to accommodate nursing student clinical rotations is awaiting a site plan.

The statuses of new businesses and development coming to Thurmont:

Subdivisions

Hammaker Hills, Phase 1 (Woodland Ave.) — 19 permits issued.

Hammaker Hills, Phase 2 (Westview Drive) — Preliminary plat approved for 22 single-family lots in R-2 district. The improvement plan is conditionally approved.

Mechanicstown, LLC (Emmitsburg Road) — Preliminary plat approved for 31 single-family lots in R-2/ ARP district.

Mountain Brooke (Emmitsburg Road) — Preliminary plat approved for 11 single-family lots in R-2/ ARP district.

Oak Forest Townhouse Community (East Moser Road) — Concept plan submitted for a 36-unit townhouse community in R-5 district.

Simmer’s Subdivision (Apples Church Road) — Concept plan submitted for a 40-unit townhouse community in R-5 district.

Site Plans

Thurmont Business Park (Thurmont Blvd.) — Lot 1 to be developed for the relocation of Goodwill into a 17,850 square foot building – final site plan under review.

Ordinance

Floodplain Management Ordinance: Repeal of Chapter 27 of Town Code to be replaced with updated Maryland Department of Environment Model Floodplain Management Ordinance as required by Federal Emergency Management Agency and Maryland Department of Environment.

New Businesses

Weis Gas ‘N Go is now open at Weis Markets.

Studio 24 at 21 East Main Street will open in mid- to late-June.

10 Tavern will be open in mid-June at 10 East Main Street. 10 Taven is formally known as Thurmont Bar & Grill and has been totally renovated and has a full liquor license.

Deb Abraham Spalding

Part 1: The Path to Healing Starts with NRT

Dr. Lo of the Nutritional Healing Center in Frederick has been a valuable Catoctin Banner Team member for several years. He advertises his business in The Catoctin Banner, and he’s the author of the “Ask Dr. Lo” monthly column. As the publisher of this newzine, I didn’t realize just how valuable Dr. Lo would become for me personally until February, when a friend said I needed to go see him and scheduled an appointment for me. 

I had spent months battling various aches and pains that prompted me to visit my doctor and emergency room (three times) for a series of ailments. The first was a band of chest pain that scared me enough to go to the emergency room in the middle of the night. Next was a torn calf muscle that had escalated from a fall. The third was severe back and abdominal pain that I thought could become something life-threatening. 

My assumptions were proven wrong as CT scans, x-rays, and blood tests revealed no explanation for every pain I had except the calf pain. For everything else, I was completely “normal!” I’ve decided that “normal” these days must be the constant state of tolerating aches and pains! I was baffled and embarrassed. But there had to be an explanation for pain so severe that I needed help to put my pants on. 

Walking into Dr. Lo’s office was my first successful step on my path to healing. Day one was a series of tests completed with Dr. Lo’s assistant, Mary, followed by Dr. Lo’s interpretation of the test reports. Dr. Lo’s patients will never remove clothing during a visit, nor will they have blood or body fluids extracted for testing. Isn’t that interesting? 

After analyzing my test reports, Dr. Lo asked me to lay on his chiropractic table. (I have yet to have a chiropractic adjustment since seeing Dr. Lo.) Then he asked me to place one hand over my area of concern, my abdomen/belly button in my case, and put my other arm up in the air. He had me resist his attempts to move my raised arm while he placed various vials of substances (food, chemicals, minerals, etc.) against my thigh. With each placement of a vial and each push of my arm, he’s asking my body if it has a problem with the substances in the vials. He narrows down the vials from sides of a case to rows and then to individual vials to determine the culprits responsible for a person’s dis-ease. 

This is called Nutritional Response Testing (NRT). So far, I’m halfway through my twelve-visit program with Dr. Lo. In the beginning, Dr. Lo revealed that I was toxic. I had filled myself with so much unhealthy food and exposed myself to metals that had caused my body to express itself in pain.  

I had an ionic foot bath at the end of my first appointment. There were all kinds of toxins pouring out of my feet! I started to feel better immediately. Over the next several weeks, the toxins left my body through a series of rashes. I’ve lost weight and I no longer have pain, not even joint pain. Now, I’m learning to deal with my stress levels and, with all of that pain behind me, I’m ready to be more active to rebuild muscle mass. I’m on an exciting journey! 

Dr. Lo has a wall filled with degrees and certifications. He’s a Doctor of Chiropractic and has run a large practice that he’s paired down over forty years to the specific method he primarily uses today called Nutritional Response Testing or NRT. He’s still a chiropractor, but chiropractic is just one tool in his tool kit.

You’ve heard the old saying, “You are what you eat,” right? Well, it’s true that we’re eating poisons and pesticides and bugs and metals and a whole bunch of man-made junk that our bodies DO NOT LIKE. When our bodies don’t like something, it presents us with aches and pains, inflammation, rashes, acne, flatulence, chronic dis-ease, and eventually disease. Dr. Lo can help identify our unique intolerances by asking our bodies to communicate via muscle testing. 

Chiropractic adjustments are important to keep our energy pathways open, but I’ve learned they can be only temporary relief if we don’t determine whether there’s a nutritional component that’s at the root of our pain. Get this! After just six weeks through Dr. Lo’s NRT program, my sciatic back pain — for which I’ve been tolerating and seeking chiropractic help over the past twenty years — is GONE! 

Dr. Lo understands that there’s a level of disbelief to overcome with NRT. He found NRT because he had his own health emergency in 2006. While working at his large chiropractic practice in Crofton, Maryland, he experienced vertigo and was physically sick. Even he, a doctor, couldn’t find an accurate analysis for his problems. He found a doctor who used an Applied kinesiology approach to nutrition. This doctor found that Dr. Lo had a virus in his ear. This journey led Dr. Lo down his own path to healing. He was looking for answers and went to a session at BWI Airport and discovered NRT. 

By 2009, he had cut back his practice and now enjoys life, especially playing Pickleball. He found the road to healing himself and took his practice along with it. His discoveries changed his practice from a large enterprise taking insurance for chiropractic to stopping the insurance game and focusing on nutrition with chiropractic as a tool. 

We haven’t been schooled to believe that we know the answers for our health. We’ve been schooled to seek out a doctor’s testing and interpretation and then take the pills that are prescribed. Now we’re a society that’s getting sicker and sicker. 

Dr. Lo is our sleuth. He’s our tenured NRT practitioner. He’s dedicated his life to truly helping others. In many cases he has shown a path of miracles.

Dr. Lo is shown in his office where he meets with clients.

Photo by Deb Abraham Spalding

Richard D. L. Fulton

A new agricultural business has been established, based in Smithsburg, Maryland, that specializes in drones that may be programmed to distribute various applications to fields, replacing more traditional means of applying chemicals or other compounds to crops.

The company, Accurate Ag Spraying (AAS), offers various types of agricultural drones (designated as sprayer drones) that are designed according to the needs of the purchaser.

According to AAS’s website, the company is “the Mid Atlantic’s premier drone dealer,” and can offer drone support and shipping to Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Delaware. “Our supplier (DJI) is a leader in drone technology and provides the highest guarantee in operation. The drones we sell are meant to be used for the agricultural industry. We provide training, servicing, and support for all of our products.”

According to AAS, all of their sprayer drones feature “intuitive” software and controls for both manual operation and fully autonomous operation.  “Our drones will not only fly but spray and/or spread completely by themselves.”

The drones can be programmed to perform the desired application task by inputting the boundaries and parameters of the field to which the application is to be made. “Boundaries can be imported from shape files, or manually, created on the remote,” the company states.

The company’s agricultural drones can handle liquid and granular products. Typical liquid applications include fungicides, insecticides, foliar fertilizers, and herbicides, while granular applications typically include broadcast cover crops and fertilizers.  Broadcasting cover crops represents a faster way of sowing, as opposed to placing seeds individually.

Depending on the model of a drone, Accurate Ag Spraying’s drones can apply 0.25 to 15 gallons per acre of liquid product and 3 to 300 pounds per acre of granular product. The company states that the low-volume rates (typically 2 gallons per acre) are the most commonly used.

During manual flight, a drone can fly up to 33 feet per second, or 22.5 miles per hour. Automated operation allows speeds up to 23 feet per second or 15.5 miles per hour. “At this speed,” the company states, “our drones can still follow slopes up to 30 degrees, while sensing obstacles in their flight path.”

For an example of weight and recharging rates, the DJI T30 model drone (rated as one of the best agricultural drones by talosdrones.com) weighs 58 pounds when empty and 168 pounds when fully loaded and features “specially built batteries designed to charge extremely fast without overheating, even in hot summer conditions.”

AAS states, “With the correct setup, batteries will charge as fast or faster than the drone is able to deplete them. This means you can operate nonstop by simply swapping batteries when the drone comes back to refill.”

Each of the drones AAS offers have First Person View (FPV) cameras “designed to provide the operator with a live view on the controller screen… FPV cameras support up to a two-mile range, which is extremely useful when spot-spraying weeds.”

The T30 also comes equipped with industry-leading obstacle avoidance, utilizing digital beam forming (DBF) radar, which can sense obstacles as small as one centimeter in diameter, causing the drone to either stop and alert the operator or automatically fly around the obstacle.

AAS will also provide customers with resources to assist in the licensing process. Resources include free study guides and access to one of the nation’s leading drone regulations consultants and a leading drone insurance provider.  Licenses and certifications will also be needed to legally operate a sprayer drone in the United States.

In addition to sales and post-purchase customer support (including troubleshooting, diagnostics, and repairs), AAS also offers a repair service, licensing and certification assistance, and can  recommend licensed applicators that provide liquid and granular applications.

AAS, located at 14254 Ridenour Road in Smithsburg, may be contacted by phone by calling 833-305-3607, or by email at kenny@accurateagspraying.com. 

Business hours are Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., and is closed on Saturdays and Sundays.

For additional information, visit the company website at accurateagspraying.com.

Drone flying over crops.

Photo Courtesy of Accurate Ag Spraying

The status of new businesses and development coming to Emmitsburg:

    Federal Stone (Creamery Road, east side of U.S. 15) — Awaiting the submission of an updated site plan and improvement plans. Payment and Performance bonds are also being reviewed.

    Ripleigh’s Creamery (W. Main Street) — Delayed due to funding, but ice cream truck operation started in April.

    Seton Village (South Seton Avenue) — The Daughters of Charity Ministries, Seton Village Property is seeking to formally re-plat the property, creating two lots for purposes related to ownership. 

    Village Liquors & Plaza Inn (Silo Hill Parkway) — Owner has received conditional approval of the Addition Plat and is now seeking to have an updated site plan and improvement plat approved by the Planning Commission.

    McDonald’s (Silo Hill Parkway) — Additional driveway construction is planned.

    Mount St. Mary’s Seton Shrine E Wing (South Seton Avenue) — Renovations to accommodate nursing student clinical rotations is in the planning phase. Parking inquiry: Is the classification “commercial, business, technical or trade school,” which will require one spot per three students?

The status of new businesses and development coming to Thurmont:

Subdivisions

Hobb’s Division (East Main Street): Final plat recorded for two lots in Mixed-Use Village 1.

Hammaker Hills, Phase 1 (Woodland Ave.) Final plat recorded for 37 single-family lots in R-2 district. Ten permits issued.

Hammaker Hills, Phase 2 (Westview Drive): Preliminary plat approved for 22 single-family lots in R-2 district. The improvement plan is conditionally approved.

     Mechanicstown, LLC (Emmitsburg Road): Preliminary plat approved for 31 single-family lots in R-2/ ARP district.

     Mountain Brooke (Emmitsburg Road): Preliminary plat approved for 11 single-family lots in R-2/ ARP district.   

Meunier Minor Subdivision (North Carroll Street): Preliminary/final plat approved for one new lot and adjustment of two lots in R-2 district.

Simmer’s Minor Subdivision (Apples Church Road) Preliminary/final plat approved for one single-family lot.

Oak Forest Townhouse Community (East Moser Road) Concept plan submitted for a 36-unit townhouse community in R-5 district.

     505 E. Main St. Minor Subdivision (E. Main Street): Preliminary/final plat approved for one lot.

     Simmer’s Subdivision (Apples Church Road): Concept plan submitted for a 40-unit townhouse community in R-5 district.

Site Plans

Thurmont Business Park (Thurmont Blvd.): Lot 1 to be developed for the relocation of Goodwill into a 17,850 square foot building – final site plan under review.

New Businesses

Weis Gas N’ Go is now open at Weis Markets.

Studio 24 is coming to 21 East Main Street in June.

10 Tavern will be open in June at 10 East Main Street.

Pictured from left are Thurmont Commissioners, Bill Blakeslee and Wayne Hooper; Shawn Legambi; Rebecca Legambi; The Rosie Boutique Owner Jaden Legambi; Karie Taylor; Courtney Casper; Lucas Bonvillain; Billy Casper; Thurmont Commissioner Wes Hamrick; and Thurmont Mayor John Kinnaird. Visit the Rosie Boutique at www.therosieboutique.com.

Photos Courtesy of Main Street Thurmont

Welcome Kenny Vanover, owner of Catoctin Mountain Motorsports, and Aaron Reckley, owner of Thirty 4 Detailing. Catoctin Mountain Motorsports is a full-service auto repair shop for all types of vehicles, motorcycles, and ATVs. Thirty 4 Detailing is a full-service car detailing service. Both businesses are located at 7702 Roddy Road, along Rt. 15 North. There is also U-Haul Rental. Catoctin Mountain Motorsports and Thirty 4 Detailing held an open house on Saturday, March 25. Special thanks to D&J Auto Body, Sweet Sarah’s Eats & Treats, 99.9 WFRE, Thurmont Paving, and all who attended to welcome the new businesses

The status of new businesses and development coming to Emmitsburg:

Federal Stone — (Creamery Road, east side of U.S. 15) Awaiting the submission of an updated site plan and improvement plans.

Ripleigh’s Creamery (W. Main Street) — Delayed due to funding, but ice cream truck operation starts in April.

Seton Village (South Seton Avenue) — The Daughters of Charity Ministries, Seton Village Property is seeking to formally re-plat the property, creating two lots for purposes related to ownership. 

Village Liquors & Plaza Inn (Silo Hill Parkway) — Owner is seeking to have an updated addition plat approved.

McDonald’s (Silo Hill Parkway) — Additional driveway construction is planned.

Mount St. Mary’s Seton Shrine E Wing (South Seton Avenue) — Renovations to accommodate nursing student clinical rotations is in the planning phase. Parking inquiry: Is the classification “commercial, business, technical, or trade school,” which will require one spot per three students?

The status of new businesses and development coming to Thurmont:

Subdivisions

        Hobb’s Division (East Main Street) — Final plat recorded for two lots in Mixed-Use Village 1.

Hammaker Hills, Phase 1 (Woodland Avenue) — Final plat recorded for 37 single-family lots in R-2 district. Ten permits issued.

Hammaker Hills, Phase 2 (Westview Drive): Preliminary plat approved for 22 single-family lots in R-2 district. The improvement plan is conditionally approved.

        Mechanicstown, LLC (Emmitsburg Road) — Preliminary plat approved for 31 single-family lots in R-2/ ARP district.

        Mountain Brooke (Emmitsburg Road) — Preliminary plat approved for 11 single-family lots in R-2/ ARP district.   

        Meunier Minor Subdivision (North Carroll Street) — Preliminary/final plat approved for one new lot and adjustment of two lots in R-2 district.

        Simmer’s Minor Subdivision (Apples Church Road) — Preliminary/final plat approved for one single-family lot.

        Oak Forest Townhouse Community (East Moser Road) — Concept plan submitted for a 36-unit townhouse community in R-5 district.

        505 E. Main St. Minor Subdivision (E. Main Street) — Preliminary/final plat approved for one lot.

Simmer’s Subdivision (Apples Church Road): Concept plan submitted for a 40-unit townhouse community in R-5 district.

Site Plans

        Weis Gas & Go (2 Thurmont Blvd.) — Weis Markets did a partial site redevelopment; a Gas & Go fuel station to consist of three pumps and one manned kiosk is under construction.

Thurmont Business Park (Thurmont Blvd.) — Lot 1 to be developed for the relocation of Goodwill into a 17,850-square-foot building; final site plan is under review.

James Rada, Jr.

The new Emmitsburg Rutter’s at 10201 Taneytown Pike opened near the end of January. It has 8,200 square feet of space, with 14 gasoline fuel pumps and 5 high-speed diesel fuel pumps for commercial vehicles. The site was also designed with plenty of area for tractor trailers to park, so the drivers can rest and enjoy the facilities.

The store is open 24/7 and offers a convenience store with packaged goods and more than 700 beverage options. It also has a large menu of fresh food selections and offers free Wi-Fi.

“We’ve been doing well and getting pretty good crowds since we opened,” said Manager Steve Lee.

The store is expected to employ up to 50 people, who have a starting wage of $17.50 an hour.

To celebrate the opening of the new location, Rutter’s Children’s Charities will be donating $1,000 to The Arc of Frederick County, the Vigilant Hose Company, and Mount St. Mary’s University Food Pantry.

The Rutter’s chain of convenience stores is headquartered in Central Pennsylvania. Rutter’s operates 79 locations in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and West Virginia. Part of a family-managed group of companies, Rutter’s includes convenience stores, a dairy and beverage company, and a real estate company.