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Garrett Troxell (age four) is shown participating in the Pedal Tractor Pull competition at the Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show on Sunday, September 8, 2019. As you can see from Garrett’s attire, he is a true farm boy. His grandmother, Helen Troxell, said, “Most kids’ first word is mom or dad. Garrett’s was ‘bale’ like a hay bale.”

The Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show has been held for the past 63 years. This event is multi-faceted, with a variety of activities taking place over the course of the weekend, beginning on Friday evening with the opening ceremony (see details on page 30), when local citizens and organizations are honored and the Catoctin High School FFA ambassador is selected. The opening ceremony is followed by the baked goods auction, where the baked goods that won Champion and Reserve Champion ribbons in the exhibits competition are sold. This is a big fundraiser for the event and an opportunity for local businesses to show their community support.

On Saturday, livestock are shown in the ag area and Champion and Reserve Champion farm animals are auctioned at the end of the evening. Meanwhile, entertainment, a pet show, exhibit displays, business displays, and dinner and food vendors attract a variety of visitors over the course of the day. (See exhibit and contest winners on page 31.)

On Sunday, log sawing and pedal tractor competitions are held in the ag area, a horseshoe competition is held on the grounds behind the school, and entertainment and a lunch continue to attract visitors until the show slows to a close in the afternoon.

This year, Community Show President Rodman Myers (pictured right) was given special recognition for his tenured contribution to the event, agricultural support, and community. Congratulations, Rodman!

Photos by Deb Abraham Spalding

Winterbrook Farms Fall Festival

Blair Garrett

The days are getting colder, the nights are getting longer, and the sweet scent of pumpkin spice is filling the air.

Fall is upon us, and there is no better way to kick off the new season than by having a blast with friends and family exploring local fall activities.

In Thurmont, a seven-week fall festival filled with good times and good fun beckons the local adventurer. Winterbrook Farms Fall Festival kicked off on September 21 and runs through November 3, giving the community ample time to get into the fall spirit and experience country adventure at its finest.

No matter what you like, there is surely something available for everyone to enjoy. Taylor Huffman has been managing the activities that go on for the Winterbrook Farms Fall Festival for the past eight years. She was happy to shed some insight on what makes this festival so great.

“We have over 20 activities,” Huffman said. “We have the pumpkin jumping pillow, apple cannons, mountain slides, a huge farm animal area, and ziplines. The big hit is actually the round bale rollers; you get in them and roll around like a hamster, and the kids seem to like that.”

The farm does not have any actual hamsters, but it does have a variety of playful and personable animals that aren’t afraid to come right up and say “Hi.” There are long-haired highland cattle, horses, and pigs and baby goats available to feed and spend time with.

One of the most coveted attractions for festival-goers is the tractor rides through the pumpkin patches. Nothing rings in the fall season quite like changing leaves, cooler weather, and pumpkins galore.  

The farm features a wide-open space to accommodate guests, with fun things to do scattered throughout the lot. One of the farm’s classic activities is the corn maze, which has become a staple of fall fun for kids and adults alike, and the Winterbrook Farms maze is unique in its own way.

“We have Maryland’s largest corn maze,” Huffman said. “This year, it’s 5.2 miles of trails.” It isn’t the beginning of fall until the corn mazes are up and running, and what better way to spend time with the family than journeying through a maze together to achieve a common goal. 

Since the event’s inception in 2000, the expansion has been steady and constant each season. “Year after year, we see growth as we add more activities and grow and change with the times,” Huffman said. “We did a big renovation in 2017, and we added about five acres of grass. On a busy October day, we’ll have about 2,000 people here, so it’s good to have the extra space.”

The farm does bring in people from around the Catoctin area, but the majority of patrons come from well outside Thurmont. “Most of our customers come from Baltimore and northern Virginia, but we’d love to have more locals.”

Bringing in the community to take part in fall festivities is what allows the corn maze, farm animals, and pumpkin patches to flourish year after year. And with continued community support, the events and activities can keep growing and developing as they have over the past two decades.

Though the festival season for Huffman and the crew only lasts a few short months, much more work goes into making Winterbrook Farms Fall Festival operate smoothly than meets the eye.

“This takes us months to prepare for,” Huffman said. “For a solid two months before we open, we’re out here every day, preparing and prepping new things.”

Months of prep work, paired with weeks of maintenance, brings together a product of which Huffman and the crew can be proud. With thousands of people visiting the farms each fall, it seems like all the effort and dedication is well worth putting smiles on the faces of families passing through. It’s not uncommon to hear the laughter of kids rolling around in the bale rollers, or the joy of families bouncing around on the pumpkin pillow. Everywhere you look is something completely different in its own fun way. 

In addition to the work put into running the festival each year, big plans are in the works for the end of the season. “This year is the first year we’re hosting the Great Pumpkin Run,” Huffman said. “It’s something they’ve held in Maryland before, but it was at another local farm. It’s November 2, and it’s a 5K that runs all over our farms.”

Pumpkin Runs are held all over the United States, but your local fall festival farm gets to add yet another open-to-the-public activity in which anyone can participate. There is also an added bonus to completing the 5K. “You even get a cup of apple cider and a small pumpkin at the end of the race,” Huffman said.

If distance running isn’t your style, and if pumpkin isn’t your cup of tea, perhaps picking strawberries or visiting markets is. Next summer, plans are in the works to let the public come and pick strawberries to take home.

“We’re going to be doing you-pick strawberries, so we’re hoping to expand our business and hopefully have a farm market here, too,” Huffman said. “So, we’re pretty excited.”

The 327-acre farm is only open for business a few more weeks, so if you, or a friend, are in the market to kick-off the fall season in a fun way, take a day trip on down to check out what Winterbrook Farms Fall Festival is all about. You can head down Saturdays from 11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m., and Sundays from 11:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

There’s no better way to spend a Saturday this fall, so don’t be afraid to get out of the house and do something a little different.

Colton (front) and Daniel (back) Smith launch a few apples with the farm’s apple cannons.

Two boys test out Winterbrook Farms brand new bouncy pumpkin pillow.

Thelma (right) and Louise (left) poke their heads through the fence with a big smile to greet guests.

The Town of Thurmont held a Nominating Convention on Tuesday, October 24, 2019, for the upcoming municipal election in which two commissioner seats are up for election.

Five candidates were nominated (pictured right); incumbent Wes Hamrick, new candidates Elliot Jones, Sabrina Massett, and Kenneth Oland, and incumbent Bill Buehrer.

The Thurmont Lions Club will sponsor a Candidate Forum to be held at the town office, the date and time will be announced. Mayor John Kinnaird encourages all registered voters to participate in the election and predicted a 50 percent voter turnout for this election. Let’s prove him right, Thurmont residents!

Dates to remember:

October 1 is the last day to register to vote; you can register at the town office.

October 22 is the last day to apply for an absentee ballot.

October 29 elections will be held at the Guardian Hose Company Activities Building at 123 East Main Street. Polls will open at 7:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m.

Why are you running for commissioner?

Bill Buehrer

I was first elected in 2011, vying to preserve our past and save the future of Thurmont. This board has demonstrated such through infrastructure improvement. We have vigorously looked for and received state grants, thus bringing our tax dollars back to Thurmont. I want to continue those efforts.

Wes Hamrick

I am privileged to have served the Town of Thurmont as a member of this board for six years and the fulfillment it affords to being able to make a positive difference for this town. The current board and Thurmont staff have made many inroads to improve the quality of life in Thurmont with our parks, trails, amenities and services, and I want to be a part of the exciting future for our town. This past term has literally flown past and much remains in the works that I certainly want to be a part of in seeing to fruition. It is an honor and privilege to serve and represent this community as one of its commissioners.

Elliot Jones

We, in Thurmont, have the good fortune to have a local government that works hard for its residents, with elected officials that truly care about the town. I want that experience to continue, not only for our current residents, but our future residents as well. While volunteering for events like “Halloween in the Park” and “Christmas in Thurmont” and writing articles for the Gateway publication, I’ve learned just how much of an impact our local government makes on our community. As a commissioner, I would bring my own insights and experiences to serve the community with new ideas.

Sabrina Massett

I care about making sure that the concerns and needs of my friends and neighbors are heard and responded to. I’m running to ensure we maintain our “small town” identity, even as we grow and change. I have a vision of a town that continues to welcome and embrace diversity among our residents; provides affordable rental options and homes to purchase; provides a safe environment for families to raise children, free of the disease of addiction, and supports the services necessary to retire and age in place; a town that prioritizes attracting and supporting small businesses, light, green industry, and sustainable practices. I firmly believe we as citizens can choose what’s best for Thurmont.

Kenneth W. (Kenny) Oland

I spent 40 years in public service; 25 years in law enforcement (7 years with Frederick Police, 18 years with Maryland State Police, attaining the rank of Corporal before retiring on a disability from injuries suffered in a traffic collision), 4 years with the federal government, 4 additional years with the Maryland State Police, and 7 years with the Town of Thurmont. I had my own crash consulting business for 8 years. I want to, once again, serve the citizens of the town and community that I grew up in and moved back to over 16 years ago with my family, in a leadership position.

What are your goals as a commissioner?

Bill Buehrer

My goal is to continue improving our infrastructure to bring more businesses to Thurmont and to improve housing development in a conservative manner.

Wes Hamrick

One of the pressing issues facing us, as well as other municipalities, is the continued increase in the cost of doing business and the pressure it places on the annual budget. I want to continue to work as a board with our town staff and administrative heads to continue finding ways to save money and continuously make every effort to acquire all the monies we can obtain through grants and other revenue resources. As a commissioner, I make monetary decisions and vote through the eyes of the taxpayer as though it’s coming from my own checkbook.

Elliot Jones

Not only do I want to sustain the strong sense of community in Thurmont, but I have three key initiatives that I pledge to support. First, Thurmont can and should establish a municipally owned fiber internet utility in order to provide faster, cheaper, and more efficient internet to our residents and businesses. Secondly, Thurmont should pursue long-term sustainable development, maximizing our use of our developed areas and preserving our green areas. Thirdly, Thurmont should continue to support Community Policing, which strengthens the trust between our police and our residents and prevents crimes, rather than just respond to them.

Sabrina Massett

To attract visitors to our town by capitalizing on our proximity to State and National Parks, rural vistas, and historic sites. We need to continue to grow our town center by attracting and supporting unique, small businesses for residents and visitors to enjoy. It’s my dream that adolescents and young teenagers will once again ask their parents “can I walk uptown” because there are spots to visit for an ice cream cone, a small purchase, or to “hang out.”  To ensure that Thurmont grows in the manner that we, as citizens choose, rather than allow a “cookie-cutter” approach. Growth that provides housing and services for citizens to live out their lives here if they choose.

Kenneth W. (Kenny) Oland

I would like to determine if there is a way to lower our electric bills, continue to work to improve the town’s infrastructure, streets, electric grid, parks, and water/sewer systems. Ask the youth of our community if there is anything we could do to provide them with activities. Continue to support the seniors. Determine why the police department has a high turnover rate and what we can do to attract and retain quality officers, as well as maintain the allotted number of officers. Look into the retirement benefits of our employees. Responsible growth that will bring more tax monies, which will help spread the tax burden over a larger population. Businesses: attract more business to the town, which could/will offer more employment to our community. Continue to work with the county and state governments to bring monies into the town.

Why should people vote for you? 

Bill Buehrer

I have demonstrated impeccable integrity for eight years. I’ve been a passionate spokesman for our community and have been fiscally responsible and conservative with our tax payers’ money.

Wes Hamrick

During my almost six years on the board, I have always made myself available to the public. I firmly believe, as a public servant, that it is necessary to listen to the needs, concerns, and issues of our residents and to be a voice for them as an elected official. Thurmont has been my home for a total of 40 years, a town where I spent my youth and young adult years, and a town I returned to, after being away for ten years, to raise my family. I have a vested interest for the betterment and beauty of this town and will continue to be an advocate to maintaining the small-town charm and atmosphere, whilst being inviting and welcoming for newcomers. Foremost, I am actively engaged within the community and am proudly part of its pulse and heartbeat in many facets.  Above all, ethics, integrity, respect and transparency are not a cliché in my book, but traits that I live by and will not compromise.

Elliot Jones

I just want to do right by people in the best way I know how. I want our residents and newcomers to feel safe and welcomed in our town. I want for our businesses to thrive and for their employees to be happy they’re working in our community. I want even our most remote families to be able to access their job opportunities, telehealth, homework, and other online necessities at an affordable price with reliable service. People should vote for me if they want someone to take what they like about Thurmont and polish it to a greater shine.

Sabrina Massett

I recognize that Thurmont is unique, and that we as citizens can decide to maintain what’s good; to demonstrate what we value and shape our town around these values. I have been involved in shaping our town through a lifetime of community service. Additionally, 30-plus years of human services employment gave me the opportunity to learn about many things: poverty, homelessness and housing instability, severe mental illness, the disease of addiction. My experiences taught me how to talk with people, not to them, to learn to ask the right questions, and most importantly, to listen for the answer. As commissioner, I promise to listen and learn from you. Let’s Talk.

Kenneth W. (Kenny) Oland

I will be a full-time commissioner, being retired, willing to listen to and address your concerns. I offer the citizens a person that will work with and for them and the employees of the town. I will listen to those that have a question, an opinion, or a concern. Research their concerns and then address them the best I can with the Board of Commissioners and the employees at the Town Office. I will approach all situations with an open mind then work to find a resolution to their concerns, while working for the betterment of our community as a whole. My desire is to serve the entire community, all ages, and our employees, who deserve to have quality equipment, competitive pay, and benefits that this town can afford and provide. You will have a voice while I’m serving as your commissioner of the Town of Thurmont.

Joan Bittner Fry

This is interesting information published in 1878 as a Frederick County, Maryland, resource. It makes one realize just how much things have changed in more than 100 years.

Frederick County ranks with the largest Maryland counties, having an area of 642 square miles, and is bounded on the north by Pennsylvania, on the east by Carroll, south-easterly by Montgomery, south by the Potomac River and Virginia, and on the west by the Blue Ridge, or South Mountains, separating it from Washington County.

This is one of the richest and most beautiful counties in the state. The soil is mostly limestone, with some slate and considerable “red lands.” The surface is undulating, partly mountainous — the Catoctin Mountains dividing the county into two broad valleys that to the westward being known as the Middletown Valley, which is drained by the Catoctin River and its branches; and that east of the Catoctin range is the valley of the Monocacy. Both rivers flow southward into the Potomac.

emmitsburg

Emmitsburg is situated at the terminus of the railroad of that name, and 7 miles from Rocky Ridge on the W. M. R. R. The location is in a fertile and diversified country, the surroundings of which are rich in mountain and valley scenery. To the west, Jack’s Mountain and Carrick’s Knob may be seen towering hundreds of feet in the skies and then sloping in graceful lines to the productive and beautiful valley below. The magnificent scenery, purity of the atmosphere, good mountain water, cordiality and refinement of the people make it a great place of summer resort; it is also enriched by educational institutions of great merit and celebrity. St Joseph’s Academy, conducted by the Sisters of Charity, and Mount St. Mary’s College, an institution of high endowment and character, are both near the town. There are also two public schools for whites, one for colored, and a Catholic Parochial School. The land adjacent is composed of red sandstone, quartz, and limestone; varies in price from $20 to $60 per acre, according to location and improvements; yields 15 to 30 bushel wheat, 20 to 40 oats, 50 to 150 potatoes, 20 to 50 corn; and 2 tons hay. Massasoit Tribe 41, I. O. R. M.; Junior Building Association. Population 900. Samuel N. McNair, Postmaster.

Pastors: M. E., Rev. H.P. West; Presbyterian, Rev. Lutheran, Rev. E. S. Johnston; Reformed, Rev. A. R. Kramer; Roman Catholic, Rev. Father Daniel McCarthy.

Town Officers: Burgess – John Hopp. Commissioners – Wm. Lansinger, J. H. T. Webb, Daniel Sheets, Isaac Hyder, Thomas Fraley and R. H. Gelwicks. Bailiff – Wm. Ashbaugh.

Agent R. R. and Express: Zimmerman, E R.

Barber: Parker, S A.

Basket Maker: Ellower, John.

Bakers and Confectioners: Hoke, Peter, Seabrook, J A, Tawney, JAS.

Blacksmiths: Adams & Zeck.

Brick Makers: Bell & Keilholtz.

Brick Masons: Lingg & Myers, Seabrook, Samuel.

Boot and Shoemakers: Bishop, George, Gelwicks, Theopholis, Hopp, J. F., Hoover, John, Lantzer, Jacob, Rowe, Jas. A.

Broker: Horner, WG.

Cabinetmakers: Bushman, Thomas, Sweeney, Martin.

Carpenters and Builders: Snouffer, Joseph, Tyson & Lansinger.

Carriage and Wagonmakers: Baker, L A F, Baker, Nicholas, Harley, Wm, Hess & Weaver, Houck, Wm H.

Cigars and Tobacco: McNair, SN, Scheek, Francis.

Clothing, Hats, & C: Rowe, J & CF.

Constable: Gillelan, Geo L.

Dentists: Bussey, JT.

Druggists: Eichelberger, CD, Elder, James A.

General Merchandise: Annan, IS & Bro, Bussey, Mrs. JP, Helman, JA, Rowe, GW & Sons.

Groceries and Produce: Hays, JT, Hoke, Peter, Waddle, JS, Zeck, Dietrick.

Hotels: Emmett, CS Smith.

Western Md: DG Adelsberger.

Justices of the Peace: Adelsberger, MC, Knauff, James, Stokes, Henry.

Livery and Sale Stables: Guthrie & Beam.

Lumber, Coal: Motter, Maxell & Co.

Marble Worker: Lough, N A.

Machinists: Praley, Thos & Son, Rowe, Nathaniel.

Millinery and Fancy Goods: Hoke, JL, Offutt, Miss H, Winter, Miss SA.

Millers: Bell, John M, Grimes, Charles, Hovise, Francis, Maxwell, Samuel, Motter, L M, Myers, Jacob, Sell, Peter, Septer, James.

Photographers: Rowe, J & CF.

Physicians: Annan, Andrew, Annan, RL, Brawner, John B, Eichelberger, CD, Eichelberger, James W, Eichelberger, James W Jr.

Restaurant: Lawrence, Daniel.

Saddles and Harness: McGuigan, James S, Stokes, Henry.

Stoves and Tinware: Adelsberger, Jas F, Hays, JT.

Tailors: Favorite, H J, Webb, J H T

Tanner: Motter, Lewis M

Watches and Jewelry: Eyster, G T & Bro.

foxville

Foxville is situated near the Washington County Line, 4 miles from Smithsburg on the W. M. R. R. Land ordinary, one-half cleared; sells at from $10 to $30 per acre, produces 14 bushel wheat, and 40 corn. M. E. and Lutheran Churches. Two public schools Population 250. Harvey Buhrman, Postmaster.

Attorney at Law: Harbaugh, John C.

Blacksmiths: Krise, E, Weller, Jacob.

Carpenters: Wolf, Henry, Wolf, Upton.

Constable: Hayes, H Clay.

General Merchandise: Brown, H , Fox, Thomas C, Ridenoner, Jacob.

Justice of the Peace: Fox, George H.

Physician: Buhrman, Harvey.

Shoemakers: Prior, Emanuel, Renner, Elias.

Timber Merchants: Brown, WB, Bussard, Samuel, Fox, George L. Moser, Ezra, Wyant, Yost.

lewistown

Lewistown is situated on the Emmittsburg Road, 10 miles from Frederick and 5 from Harmony Grove. Land, red clay, and limestone sells at from $10 to $100 per acre; produces 12 to 30 bushel wheat, 50 corn, 40 oats, 100 potatoes and 2 tons hay. Crops are generally good. M.P. Church and two public schools. Population 175. A.N. Cramer, Postmaster.

Blacksmiths: Layman, Jacob, Weller, J P.

General Merchandise: Cramer, AN, Zimmerman, GT.

Justice of the Peace: Cator, Henry.

Physician: Leatherman, ME.

Boots & Shoes: Bishop, Jacob, Shaeffer, Jno FD.

Hotel: Clemm, Geo. H.

Millers: Gonso, George, Leatherman, Daniel, Taylor, CW.

Saddles & Harness: Maine, HM.

mechanicstown

Mechanicstown (now Thurmont) is on the W.M.R.R., 56 miles from Baltimore, 15 by pike from Frederick and 27 by rail, and three-fourths of a mile from the Catoctin Mountains. The nearest streams are the Hunting and Owing’s Creeks; it is located in a pleasing and thriving country. The climate and health are good, business fair. Soil is of red shale, yellow slate, alluvial, and some limestone. The land is principally cleared, ranges in prices from $30 to $60 per acre, and yields 8 to 20 bushel wheat, 10 to 40 oats, 80 to 50 corn and 1 to 2 tons hay. The Catoctin Furnace is within 2 miles and in operation. The timber now remaining consists of oak, hickory, walnut, chestnut, poplar and beech. Population 700. John Root, Postmaster.

Agent-R. R. & Express: Horn, WA.

Barber: Lucas, Amos.

Blacksmiths and Wheelwrights: Firer, Benj F, Hess, Wm, Horn, Wm Loy, Wm, Webb, Wm.

Bricklayers: Eigenbrode, Dan’l, Moser, Cyrus.

Brick Manufacturer: Fleagle, John A.

Butcher: Damuth, Wm.

Carpenters & Undertakers: Creager, James, Dorsey, Geo B, Shaw, Thomas, Smith, E M, Weddle, Joseph A, Weller & Creager, Weller, Simon A.

Cigar Manufacturers: Orndorff, AF, Whitmore, KS.

Confectionery: Martin, JE, Constables, Peddicord, Caleb, Renner, John A.

Dentist: Radcliffe, Dr. HG.

Druggists: Gilds & Co.

Flour, Feed & Fertilizers: Cassell, Chas E, Stocksdale, Geo W, Witherow, SH.

General Merchandise: Gilds, NE, Johnson, Geo H, Root & Groff.

Harnessmakers: Freese, Joseph, Martin, DC.

Hotels: Central, Jacob Sprow, Gilbert, John B Gilbert.

Huckster: Damuth.C A

Justice of the Peace: White, Frederick.

Marbleworker: Hammaker, BF.

Millers: Jones, John, Martin, J & DC.

Milliners & Dressmakers: Gernand, Miss Jennie, Hesson, Miss Kate, Lony, Miss Mary, Stokes, Miss Susan.

Millwrights: Biggs & Carmack.

Painters: Adelsberger, Jas, Mackley Bros.

Photographer: Boblitz, BL.

Physicians: Marsh, Wm H, White, Wm, Zimmerman, AK.

Shoemakers: Cover, BN, Cover, JH, Picking, Leonard, Stull Bros.

Stock Dealers: Anders, Thomas, Barton, Isaac N

Stoves and Tinware: Osler, VP.

Surveyors: Landers, John, Picking, Leonard.

Tailor: Sleek, AB.

Tanner: Rouner, John.

Telegraph Operator: Horn, WA.

Wagonmaker: Stokes, Joshua.

Watches & Jewelry: Hoff, David T.

rocky ridge

Rocky Ridge is on the W. M. R. R., at the junction of the Emmittsburg Road, 51 miles from Baltimore and 7 from Emmittsburg and 16 from Frederick City. The soil is red slate and is valued at from $20 to $50 per acre; produces 8 to 25 bushel wheat, 15 to 30 oats, 80 to 40 corn and 2 tons hay. Lutheran, Reformed and Baptist Churches and public school. Population 60. H. D. Fuss, Postmaster.

Agent Express & R.R.: Eichelberger, MJ.

Blacksmith & Wheelwrights: Appold, George, Campbell, JE, Wood, Basil.

Carpenter & Builder: Engler, OA.

Commission Merchants: Biggs & Eichelberger.

General Merchandise: Fuss, HD, Lickle Bros.

Hotel: Ecker, Hanson.

Justice of the Peace: Norris, AL.

Millers: Biggs, Joshua, Martin, Jeremiah.

Shoemaker: Troxell, Frederick.

sabillasville

Sabillasville is on the W. M. R. R., 66 miles from Baltimore. Land is mostly cleared, can be purchased at from $15 to $40 per acre, and produces 12 to 25 bushel wheat, 20 to 50 oats, 100 to 200 potatoes, 20 to 40 corn, and 1 to 2 tons hay. German Reformed Church, Rev. H. Wissler; United Brethren, Rev. Mr. Freed; and a public school. Population 50. H. S. Duphorne, Postmaster.

Blacksmiths and Wheelwrights:  Arnsparger, Dallas, Freshour, Nelson.

Broom Manufacturer: Stein, Henry.

Carpenter: Willard, Joel.

Constable: Stotelinger, JC.

Dressmaker: Homerick, Susan, Manahan, Jane.

General Merchandise: Crawford & Bro, Hiteshew, Charles.

Hotel: Stern (Stem), John.

Justice of the Peace: Luckett, WF.

Miller: Kenna, Simpson.

Physicians: Luckett, WF Watson, J.G.

Shoemaker: Duphorne, RS.

The men and women of Emmitsburg’s community fire, rescue, and emergency medical services proudly announce their annual Fire and Life Safety Open House on Thursday evening, October 10, 2019, from 6:00-8:30 p.m., at the Fire Station, located at 25 West Main Street in Emmitsburg. This will be the 64th year that Vigilant Hose Company (VHC) personnel have sponsored this always-popular event. Fire and injury prevention in Emmitsburg is a year-round effort done in concert with area residents, businesses, schools, institutions, and governmental agencies, but it’s during Fire Prevention Month that department personnel seek to especially underscore the importance of prevention and preparedness.

Fire Prevention Week is October 6-12, 2019. The theme for National Fire Prevention Month 2019 (October) is: “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape: Plan and Practice your Escape.”

As part of the VHC’s continuing efforts to educate everyone in our community about essential elements of smoke alarm safety, this year’s Fire Prevention Open House will include: information and demonstrations to help families and individuals prevent unwanted fire; Emergency Medical Services providers will be on hand to showcase their life-saving skills; VHC personnel will be showcasing smoke detectors; “STOP THE BLEED” (courtesy of the Junior Fire Company of Frederick), with insights on the national awareness campaign that encourages bystanders to become trained, equipped, and empowered to help in a bleeding emergency before professional help arrives; information regarding opportunities for residents and business alike to help their First Responders; information regarding the countywide “Gear-Up” Campaign; Frederick County Resident Deputy Sheriffs will offer crime prevention materials and a range of important safety insights; fire truck rides; free refreshments; door prizes; and more! For more information, visit www.vhc6.com.

The Frederick County Fire & Rescue Museum is pleased to invite you to the the dedication of the William Cochran etching “volunteers” on October 4, 2019, at 7:30 p.m. at the Frederick County Fire & Rescue Museum in Emmitsburg.

by James Rada, Jr.

SEPTEMBER 2019 Meeting

Colorfest Services Contracts Awarded

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners approved contracts to provide additional services during the 2019 Colorfest. The total cost of the contracts is $3,075 over the cost of the 2018 Colorfest contracts.

Security services: May Security of Frederick will provide 29 guards, 1 supervisor, and 1 relief guard during Colorfest weekend for $4,694.

Bus services: Rill’s Bus Services of Westminster will provide 10 standard buses and 1 wheelchair-accessible bus on Saturday, and 8 standard buses and 1 wheelchair-accessible bus on Sunday for $17,440.

Portable bathrooms: Key Sanitation of Dickerson will provide 128 regular portable toilets, 17 handicapped-accessible portable toilets, and an on-site pumping truck for $16,850.

Trash services: Key Sanitation of Dickerson will provide a special trash pick-up after 6:30 p.m. each evening, 2 dumpsters, and a recycling truck on site for $2,750, plus tipping fees.

Thurmont Town Election on October 29

The election to fill two commissioner seats will be held on October 29 at the Guardian Hose Company Activities Building on 123 East Main Street. The polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Anyone in line at 8 p.m. will be allowed to vote. The last day to register to vote in the election is close of business Oct. 1. Absentee ballot applications will be available on Oct. 4.

Commissioners Hear Road Improvement Estimates

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners heard from Arro Engineering about the probable cost to improve Carroll Street and Woodside Avenue. Mayor John Kinnaird said the improvements were a “long time coming” for roads that are “in dire need of repairs.” Doug Smith, senior project manager for Arro Engineering, said that 20-30 percent of the roads would need to be fully rehabilitated. He provided two estimates to the commissioners. One was the cost of road improvements with storm drains included ($5.3 million) and one estimate was without storm drains ($3.149 million).

Bamboo Added As Invasive Species

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners amended the town code to include bamboo as an invasive plant species. This will give the town some control over having property owners eradicate the plant if it moves onto a property outside of the person who owns the bamboo.

Halloween in the Park will take place on October 26 at Thurmont Community Park at 6:00 p.m. Rain date: November 2.       Trick-or-Treating: 6:00-7:30 p.m.

by James Rada, Jr.

SEPTEMBER 2019 Meeting

Paving Contracts Awarded

The Emmitsburg Commissioners awarded nine contracts to three companies to pave roads in town. The contracts total $90,941, which has already been budgeted for by the commissioners.

The roads to be paved are: Chesapeake Avenue (East Main St. to Lincoln Avenue); Chesapeake Avenue (Potomac St. to Potomac Avenue); Wagerman Lane; Bunker Hill Drive; Creamery Way; St. Joseph Lane (Seton Place and N. Seton Avenue); W. Lincoln Avenue at Jamison Ave. intersection; W. Lincoln Avenue at Patterson Ave. intersection.

ECM Corporation, C. J. Miller LLC, and Frederick County Paving won the contracts. By awarding the contracts by street, the town got a lower total price for all of the streets than if the commissioners had awarded one company all of the street projects.

New Businesses Move Closer to Construction

The new Rutter’s store is expected to have its final site plan submitted to the Emmitsburg Planning Commission by early 2020. Also, the proposed Dunkin’ Donuts on the site of the Silo Hill car wash is expected to submit a site plan with traffic study to the planning commission.

Emmitsburg Passes Firewood Policy

The Emmitsburg Commissioners approved a policy allowing residents to collect firewood from town property. A free permit is required, and it allows town residents to collect firewood from June 1 to August 31. Only downed trees on town property within 100 feet of Hampton Valley Road can be cut for firewood. Also, motorized off-road equipment or vehicles cannot be used to remove the firewood.

Emmitsburg’s Annual Halloween Parade & Costume Contest is on October 31, from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Parade starts at 7:00 p.m. (intersectioin of Federal & DePaul St.). Refreshments & contest winner announcements following parade at Vigilant Hose Co.       Trick-or-Treating: 5:30-7:30 p.m.

The Town of Thurmont held a Nominating Convention on Tuesday, October 24, 2019, for the upcoming municipal election in which two commissioner seats are up for election. Five candidates were nominated (pictured right); incumbent Wes Hamrick, new candidates Elliot Jones, Sabrina Massett, and Kenneth Oland, and incumbent Bill Buehrer.

The Thurmont Lions Club will sponsor a Candidate Forum to be held at the town office, the date and time will to be announced.

Mayor John Kinnaird encourages all registered voters to participate in the election and predicted a 50% voter turnout for this election. Let’s prove him right, Thurmont residents!

Dates to remember:

October 1 is the last day to register to vote, you can register at the town office.

October 22 is the last day to apply for an absentee ballot.

October 29 elections will be held at the Guardian Hose Company Activities Building at 123 East Main Street. Polls will open at 7:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m.


Staff members of Senior Benefit Services, Inc. and realtors of CLIMB Properties gathered for a grand opening of their new offices at 112 E. Main Street in Thurmont on Saturday, September 21, 2019.

Senior Benefits Services (SBS)celebrates a new beginning in the new space, having moved from offices on Water Street in Thurmont. Senior Benefits’ Phyllis Nizer said, “Today is a very important day for us at SBS. We’ve grown into a new location in this beautiful older home in Thurmont to continue serving your Medicare and retirement needs for all ages, not just 65 and over.”

Karen Simundson of Senior Benefits Services has been in Insurance for 20 years. She recruits and manages agents for Senior Benefits, which has a corporate office in Hagerstown, Maryland. She said, “We added a Thurmont office a handful of years ago but outgrew our spaces. I bought the Main Street house to be a permanent fixture in business here.”

She explained, “At SBS we provide retirement and insurance services that take folks from employee to retiree as seamlessly as possible. We do 401K & IRA rolls, income planning, life insurance, and many indemnity plans. We know Medicare inside and out, but also review folks’ group benefits that they may be able to keep at retirement. We educate so one knows what they have, how to use it, and any exposure they may be responsible for down the road.”

It’s important to note that all SBS services are free, so it’s free to look, shop, compare! SBS has four agents in Thurmont. They are licensed in Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Virginia.

Call Senior Benefits Services at 301-271-4040 or visit www.seniorbenefitclient.com for more information.

When CLIMB Properties broker Caron Kinsey started making a list in order to start her own company, the five W’s (who, what, where, when, why) were answered, the model thought through, and CLIMB Properties became a reality. Caron attended broker class over an hour away, in each direction, three days a week for four months, sometimes having to drive in snow and icy conditions. She then secured office space, conquered business logistics, and, of course, enlisted real estate agents. Caron worked with one agent who followed her from RE/MAX to start CLIMB. She then added another and then another. The business model was based on Caron’s own agent experiences that inspired her unique brokerage perspective. She explained, “What can CLIMB Properties do for their agents, instead of how much do agents give to their traditional brokers.” Caron felt that the brokerage was designed “by an agent for an agent,” which is not the normal flow of the real estate business.

Now, two-and-a-half years later, CLIMB has 15 agents, 1 administrative manager, and 3 offices (Frederick, Hagerstown, and Thurmont). CLIMB Properties is licensed in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and services clients in residential, commercial, land and farms, and investors, with specialties in luxury homes, estates, and historic properties.

 CLIMB Properties hopes to add 5 more licensed real estate agents by the end of 2019, and ultimately grow to about 50. As CLIMB’s tag line reads, “helping their clients AND their agents reach new heights” is the number one goal!

Call CLIMB at 240-215-6533 or visit www.climbproperties.com for more information.

Theresa Dardanell


Pictured from left are: (back row) Pat Wastler (Prayer Shawl Coordinator), Pastor Katy Mossburg, James Gray (Lay leader), Gene Long, Celeste Carroll, Alan Flowers; (front row) JoAnn Mossburg (Church Council Chair) and Gloriae Green.

Lewistown UMC Prays 4 You. Those are the words on the new community prayer box in front of the Lewistown United Methodist Church (LUMC). Do you know someone who needs extra prayers right now, maybe a friend or a family member or even you? Members of the Lewistown United Methodist Church want to pray for your special needs. LUMC Pastor Katy Mossburg said, “We want people to know we are here for them and to help them be connected to God.” 

The locked prayer box is prominently displayed in front of the church at 11032 Hessong Bridge Road; pen and paper are provided. Requests are confidential and anonymous, unless you would like to be contacted for a follow-up call or visit.

Pastor Katy collects the prayer requests daily and sends them to members of the prayer chain who are dedicated to praying for the needs of the community. Prayers can also be requested by sending an email to lumcprays4u@gmail.com. Prayer shawls are also available; shawls are prayed over and blessed when made and presented to the recipient with a prayer and an additional blessing. Pastor Katy said, “It is like wrapping yourself up in a big hug from God.”

Megan Doolittle

Elower-Sicilia Productions (ESP) ESP dancers are back for a new dance year and are excited to dance for their community! The dancers loved dancing at the Community Show, as well as the Thurmont Art & Wine Stroll! They will also perform at Colorfest in the Thurmont town park on both Saturday and Sunday at noon. While ESP is celebrating its 50th anniversary, the ESP Performing Company has been working hard at brand new choreography for a new year. ESP is so lucky to have such a great group of dancers, who love to express their love for dance through their performances. ESP Performing Company has a couple of events coming up in the near future that we would like to invite you to attend!  

ESP would like to invite all to come and participate in the 9th Annual ESP 5k “Superheroes On The Run Fighting through Breast Cancer” on October 26, 2019. We are again proud to use this event to honor our dear ESP friend who lost her battle with breast cancer in 2010. Pamela Gray Hobbs was a dancer, teacher, and parent affiliated with ESP for over 20 years. She remains in our hearts. In memory of Pam, a portion of the proceeds from this event will be donated to help support Maggie Kudirka, aka “The Bald Ballerina.”  Maggie is a Maryland native who was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer at the age of 23, while she was dancing with the Joffrey Ballet Company in New York.  Maggie has been a strong advocate for breast cancer awareness.  The money raised will help with the cost of Maggie’s increasingly large medical bills, as she has already received 85 maintenance treatments. 

We always like to have a little fun with this event! So besides running a beautiful course lined with dancers cheering you on, this year we will be holding a contest for the most creative, most powerful and the cutest costumes! Runners and volunteers will be entered into this contest and the winners will receive a prize. Please register at ESP Dance Studio @ 15 Water St. Thurmont or you can register on Active: https://bit.ly/2m1ZaYt.

For more information, contact the studio at 301-271-7458. Be sure to check them out on Facebook.

The ESP Performing Company would like to extend a special “thank you” to the Thurmont community, The Catoctin Banner, and to The Frederick Arts Council for all of their continued support.

ESP taking its fight to new heights.

Children of all ages enjoyed a fun-filled day of games, demonstrations, food, and laughter at the Back-to-School Celebration on Sunday, August 25, 2019, sponsored by the First Baptist Church of Thurmont, located at 7 Sunny Way in Thurmont. 

Members of various community organizations, including Girl Scouts, YMCA After-School Program, Good News Club, and Fountain Rock Nature Center, presented their programs to the adults and children and explained how they could participate. Also, Maryland State Police Officer Cpl. Corey Borns and local Crossing Guard Eleanor Putman shared safety tips regarding traffic, building safety, crowd issues, and other school activities. School Music Teacher Alison Schroeder talked about what to expect the first day of school in order to avoid any anxiety, confusion, or uncertainty about classes, teachers, or building directions. Beautician Roxanne Renner offered interesting beauty tips, and Nurse Pam Adams did health checks and shared health tips that were helpful to both the children and parents.

Donations of school supplies were received for Operation Christmas Child, an international mission organization that helps less-privileged children with clothes, shoes, and other gifts at Christmas. A special prayer was offered for everyone involved in education, students as well as teachers, bus drivers, staff, etc., for a productive, safe and enjoyable school year.  There were games and snow cones that added to the fun and information. The youth of the church were guides and did a great job of helping to lead the children throughout the event. The event was enjoyed by all and provided lots of useful information and guidance.

On July 20, 2019, the Thurmont Lions Club held a 50’s Sock Hop. The proceeds were donated to the non-profit organization “Music for Medicine Foundation” to help combat the heroin epidemic in the Thurmont community. 

On August 14, 2019, a donation of $550 was presented to Rachel Hubbard, Music for Medicine Foundation.

The Lions Club extends its gratitude to everyone who attended the Sock Hop to support this important fundraiser.

Alumni of the former St. Joseph’s High School met for their monthly gathering at the Ott House Pub in Emmitsburg on August 7, 2019.

Pictured above are Gloria Joy Bauerline (age 96), Donald Joy, Bernadette Joy, Cynthia Joy Trout, her husband Dan Trout, and John “Buzz” Walter.

Don and Buzz recall playing basketball on the same team at St. Joseph’s 70 years ago (1949). Don was the leading scorer with 345 points, and Buzz second with 225 points. All present had a good time.

The Thurmont Lions Club (TLC) would like to express its sincere gratitude and appreciation to the Thurmont community, surrounding counties, and all the travelers on Rt. 15, who stopped by its sandwich booth for their support of the pit beef, pit ham, pit pork, and pit turkey sandwich sales held this summer. The community’s dedication to the club over the past numerous years have been nothing short of amazing.

TLC saw record crowds this year for its sixth sandwich sales event. The club’s dedication to quality food and large portions has been major contributors to the sales. This year has been an astonishing, outstanding year, with the club netting a profit of $15,300.   

These successful events have supported the club in helping to sustain donations to sight-related organizations and organizations within our community.

The Thurmont Lions Club will be celebrating its 90th anniversary in October. Over the years, the community has helped in providing eyeglasses; doing preschool vision screening; and giving to the Thurmont Food Bank, local schools, Thurmont Regional Library, Diabetes Awareness, and many, many more local and vision-related organizations.

Scouting for Food is an annual food collection, orchestrated by Boy Scouts of America as a community service project since 1985.

Cub Scouts, Scouts, Venturers, and Sea Scouts will be placing bags/notes on doors on November 2, to remind people to donate on November 9 (when the Scouts will come by and pick up any donations from your porch). All donations collected stay local and are delivered to the local food banks in the Thurmont, Emmitsburg, and Lewistown areas. The food banks do not accept expired items.

Not sure what you should donate? Here are some of the most highly needed items: non-perishable food items; canned protein (tuna, salmon, chicken, peanut butter); soups and stews (beef stew, chili, meat-based soups); 100% fruit juices (all sizes); grains (pasta, whole grain pasta, rice, brown rice, boxed macaroni & cheese); cereals (multi-grain, cheerios, cornflakes, raisin bran, grape nuts, oatmeal); canned vegetables; canned fruits; condiments; hygiene products (diapers, toilet paper, tissues, soap, toothpaste); baby essentials (wipes, food, diapers); pet foods (cat and dog—canned and dry).

With help from the Foundation for Children with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, the Catoctin Area Civitan Club gave the Town of Emmitsburg $25,000 to help build an inclusive playground. Mayor Don Briggs accepted the check (pictured right).

Would you like to help people in your community? Check the Catoctin Area Civitan Club out. They meet on the second Monday of the month, from 6:30-8:00 p.m., at the Graceham Moravian Church, located at 8231 Rocky Ridge Road in Thurmont. Call 301-606-6891 for more information.

The opening ceremonies of the 63rd annual Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show were held on Friday evening, September 6 at Catoctin High School.

Three community organizations were honored for their milestone anniversaries and each organization had several honorees who were recognized.  These organizations were The 50th anniversary of the Seton Center in Emmitsburg, the 100th anniversary of American Legions in America with Veterans from Posts 121 in Emmitsburg and 168 in Thurmont honored, and the 50th anniversary of the Elower-Sicilia Dance Studio in Thurmont.

What began as a day care center to meet the needs of local pre-school children and their families has grown into a community landmark for area residents who are seeking a way to improve their lives.

In 1969, a small band of mothers advocated for a safe place to send their pre-school-aged children where they would be nurtured and given the opportunity to learn about God and caring for one another in the community. The Daughters of Charity answered the call.  Over the years, the center grew to accommodate a thrift store and outreach office. For 50 years, the mission has stayed the same: for The Seton Center to work with its neighbors to build a hopeful future in the spirit of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton and Saint Vincent de Paul.

The Seton Center’s Honorees were: Kenneth Droneburg, Manager; Melissa Miller, Program Coordinator; Kelly Overholtzer, Case Manager and Program Coordinator; and Sister Roberta Treppa, Daughter of Charity, The Seton Center’s smile-maker and coordinator for the DePaul Dental Health Program.

The American Legion organization was founded in 1919 by Veterans returning from Europe after World War I. It was later chartered as an official American patriotic society and carries on the tradition to support Veterans, families, and their community. The Legion continues to volunteer in patriotic service of mutual help to our country’s Veterans and has touched virtually every facet of American life. Even to this day, American Legion members carry on their objective to serve their community, state, and nation.

Honored Veterans representing the Francis X. Elder American Legion Post 121 of Emmitsburg were: Kevin Cogan, Thomas E. Hoke, Edward E. “Gene” Lingg, Sanford “Mac” McGuire, Paul J. Sutton, and Martin R. Williams.

Honored Veterans representing the Edwin C. Creeger, Jr. American Legion Post 168 of Thurmont were: the late Kenneth Allen, Robert H. Brennan, Edward Gravatt, Rick L. Hall, Alvin L. Hatcher, Raymond A. Long, James “Buzz” Mackley, and Sidney A. Wolf.

See next month’s issue for a more detailed article about these local Veterans in The Catoctin Banner.

Emmitsburg’s The Seton Center’s 50th Anniversary Honorees

Pictured from left are: (front row) Paige Riley – 2019-20 Catoctin FFA Ambassador; Seton Center Director Sister Martha Beaudoin – Daughter of Charity; Seton Center Honorees: Kenneth Droneburg, Sister Roberta Treppa – Daughter of Charity, Kelly Overholtzer, Jennifer Clements – Catoctin High School Principal; (not pictured) Honoree Melissa Miller; (back row) Andrea Mannix, Community Show Committee Member; Amy Poffenberger, Catoctin FFA Advisor; Daniel Myers, Community Show Committee Member; C. Rodman Myers, Community Show Committee President; Cathy Little, Community Show Committee Assistant Treasurer; Jennifer Martin, Community Show Committee Secretary; Dr. Theresa Alban, Frederick County Superintendent of Schools; Barry Burch, Catoctin FFA Advisor; Dave Harman, Community Show Committee Member; and Cheryl Lenhart, Community Show Committee Member.

Francis X. Elder American Legion Post #121 Honorees

Pictured from left are: (front row) Paige Riley – 2019-20 Catoctin FFA Ambassador; Emmitsburg’s Francis X. Elder American Legion Post #121 Honorees: Martin Williams, Sanford “Mac” McGuire, Paul Sutton, Thomas Hoke, Edward “Gene” Lingg, Kevin Cogan; (back row) Andrea Mannix, Community Show Committee Member; Amy Poffenberger, Catoctin FFA Advisor; Daniel Myers, Community Show Committee Member; C. Rodman Myers, Community Show Committee President; Cathy Little, Community Show Committee Assistant Treasurer; Jennifer Martin, Community Show Committee Secretary, Dr. Theresa Alban, Frederick County Superintendent of Schools; Jennifer Clements, Catoctin High School Principal; Barry Burch, Catoctin FFA Advisor; Dave Harman, Community Show Committee Member; and Cheryl Lenhart, Community Show Committee Member.

Edwin C. Creeger, Jr. American Legion Post #168 Honorees

Pictured from left are: (front row) Paige Riley – 2019-20 Catoctin FFA Ambassador; Thurmont’s Edwin C. Creeger, Jr. American Legion Post #168 Honorees: Alvin L. Hatcher, Raymond A. Long, Robert L. Brennan, Edward Gravatt, James “Buzz” Mackley, Rick L. Hall, and (not pictured) Sidney A. Wolf. Also honored was deceased member Kenneth Allen; (back row) Andrea Mannix, Community Show Committee Member; Amy Poffenberger, Catoctin FFA Advisor; Daniel Myers, Community Show Committee Member; C. Rodman Myers, Community Show Committee President; Cathy Little, Community Show Committee Assistant Treasurer; Jennifer Martin, Community Show Committee Secretary, Dr. Theresa Alban, Frederick County Superintendent of Schools; Jennifer Clements, Catoctin High School Principal; Barry Burch, Catoctin FFA Advisor; Dave Harman, Community Show Committee Member; and Cheryl Lenhart, Community Show Committee Member.

Elower Sicilia Dance Studio Honoree

Linda Elower Sicilia, Owner of ESP Productions in Thurmont, with C. Rodman Myers, Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show President, presenting the Community Show’s Certificate of Appreciation, and a Proclamation from Frederick County Executive Jan Gardner.

Champions & Reserve Champions

Fresh Fruits: Champion—Katlyn Robertson (Red delicious apples), Reserve Champion—Martha Hauver (Peaches); Fresh Vegetables: Champion—Brian Harbaugh (Onions), Reserve Champion—Robert Follin (Sweet Potatoes); Home Products Display: Champion—Roxanna Lambert, Reserve Champion—Beth Shriner; Canned Fruit: Champion—Sandra Santos (Peach Pie Filling), Reserve Champion—Jackie Troxell (Blackberries); Canned Vegetables: Champion—Bridgette Kinna (Apple Barbeque Sauce), Reserve Champion—Carolyn Hahn (Sweet Potatoes); Jellies & Preserves: Champion—Pamela Long (Dark Cherry Dark Chocolate), Reserve Champion—Carolyn Hahn (Black Raspberry Jelly); Pickles: Champion—Pam Kaas (Pepper Relish), Reserve Champion—Carolyn Hahn (Dill Pickles); Meat (Canned): Champion—Ann Welty (Canned Lamb), Reserve Champion—Ann Welty (Sausage); Home Cured Meats: Champion—Robert McAfee (Country Ham), Reserve Champion Dale Hurley (Country Ham); Baked Products (Cake): Champion—Karen McAfee (Red Velvet Cake), Reserve Champion—Maxine Troxell (Carrot Cake), Honorable Mention Cake–Burall Brothers Scholarship—Sue Stottlemyer (Chocolate Toffee Brownie); Bread: Champion—Maxine Troxell (White Bread), Reserve Champion—Maxine Troxell (Dinner Rolls); Pie: Champion—Pamela Long (Apple Pie), Reserve Champion—Roxanna Lambert (Cherry Pie); Sugar Free: Champion—Joyce Kline (Sugar Free Cake), Reserve Champion—Roxanna Lambert (Sugar Free Bread); Gluten Free Baked Product: Champion—Stacey Smith (Oatmeal Raisin Cookies), Reserve Champion—Stacey Smith (Zucchini Bread); Sewing: Champion—Patricia Lipscomb (Tatted Misc. item), Reserve Champion—Dawn Moser (Knitted Vest); Flowers & Plants: Champion—Roxanna Lambert (Wreath), Reserve Champion—Roxanna Lambert (Holiday Arrangement); Arts, Painting & Drawings: Champion—George Lucas (Acrylic Painting), Reserve Champion—Megan Dewees (Still Life); Crafts: Champion—Carol Hocking (Dollhouse), Reserve Champion—Mike Miller (Noah’s Ark); Color Photography: Champion—Debbie Swing (Animal Bird Photo), Reserve Champion—Dale Thomas (Landscape); Black & White Photography: Champion—Beth Shriner (Building/Architecture), Reserve Champion—Debbie Swing (Farm Animal); Corn: Champion—Daniel Myers (Hybrid Corn), Reserve Champion—Rodman Myers (Single Stalk Corn); Small Grain & Seeds: Champion—Robert McAfee (Shelled Corn), Reserve Champion—Preston Clark (Soybeans); Eggs: Champion—Stacey Smith (Brown Eggs), Reserve Champion—Kevin Jackson (White Eggs); Nuts: Champion—Charles Sayler (Shellbarks), Reserve Champion—Edward Hahn (Black Walnuts); Rabbit: Champion—Olivia Dutton (Breeding Rabbit and offspring), Reserve Champion—Olivia Dutton (Breeding Rabbit); Poultry: Champion—Laura Dutton (Broilers), Reserve Champion—Kenzie Lewis (Farm Exhibit – 1 Rooster & 1 Hen); Dairy: Champion—Gavin Valentine (Ayrshire Fall Calf), Reserve Champion—James Bassler (Brown Swiss Spring Calf); Dairy Goats: Champion—Olivia Dutton (Doe 3 years & under 5 years), Reserve Champion—Laura Dutton (Doe in Milk – 5 years & over); Hay: Champion—Steve Strickhouser (Hay, Other), Daniel Myers (Clover Hay); Straw: Champion—Daniel Myers (Barley Straw), Reserve Champion—Matthew Clark (Wheat Straw); Junior Department: Champion—Aaron Oden (Misc. Craft), Reserve Champion—Kaitlyn Eyler (Pumpkin); Junior Department Baked Product: Champion—Madison Ott (Sour Cream Pound Cake), Reserve Champion—Abby Harrington (Red Velvet Cake); Youth Department: Champion—Laura Dutton (Shoebird Wood Craft), Reserve Champion—Kaitlyn Yingling (Pastel Drawing); Youth Department Baked Product: Champion—Jessica Martin (Carrot Cake), Reserve Champion—Paige Baker (Blonde Brownie); Beef: Champion—Brittnee Brown; Reserve Champion—Jacob Keeney; Sheep: Champion—Peyton Davis, Reserve Champion—Emma Ford; Ridenour Lamb – Katilynn Ford; Swine: Champion—Jameson Ruby, Reserve Champion—Seth Miley; Market Goat: Champion—Trey Glass, Reserve Champion—Tristan VanEcho; Pet Show: Champion—John Vandercruyssen (Dog); Reserve Champion—Montana Herr (Cat); Horseshoes: 1st Place—Buck Wivell and Donnie Kaas, 2nd Place—Johnny Buhrman and Jason Kaas, 3rd Place—Dave Wivell and Dale Kaas.

The Lewistown Ruritan Club awarded scholarships to seven students at the annual Ruritan picnic in August.

The recipients and the schools they are attending are: Allison Rippeon, Shippensburg University;  Matt Gartrell, Mount Saint Mary’s University; Jennifer Lambert, Frederick Community College; and Aaron Matlock, West Virginia University.  Recipients not pictured are Meghan Jenkins, Salisbury University; Luke Staley, Hood College; and Allison Howard, Anne Arundel Community College.

Funds for these scholarships were derived from the annual Lewistown Ruritan Golf Tournament.  The members of the Lewistown Ruritan Club are proud to support these students in furthering their education.


Scholarship recipients pictured from left are: Allison Rippeon, Matt Gartrell, Jennifer Lambert, and Aaron Matlock. Recipients not pictured are Meghan Jenkins, Luke Staley, and Allison Howard.

Catoctin High School’s Mike Franklin is one of seven finalists for the 2019-2020 Maryland Teacher of the Year, announced by Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS). This most recent accomplishment is one of many honors that Franklin has earned throughout his career. These honors include: 2014 Maryland Outstanding PE Teacher, 2016 Hood College Charles E. Tressler Distinguished Teacher Award, and 2017 Fellowship of Christian Athletes Coach of the Year.

Franklin, who is a physical education teacher and baseball coach at Catoctin High School, was named Frederick County’s Teacher of the Year at the end of April. He has served as a champion and advocate for students throughout his 23 years teaching with FCPS.

Bernie Quesada, former Catoctin High School principal and now Middletown High School principal, echoes this sentiment, “Mike Franklin’s most endearing quality, and one that I personally admire, is that he has the uncanny ability to make any educational situation, no matter how difficult, much better with his positive and unwavering faith in children. That is a rare, innate quality that should be celebrated and emulated in teaching.”

Jennifer Clements, current principal at Catoctin High School, expressed her excitement surrounding Franklin’s accomplishment and stated, “Mike Franklin has been an asset to Catoctin High School for over 20 years, during which time he has taught, inspired, mentored, and supported thousands of students and colleagues. He is an excellent teacher and coach, but, most importantly, he is an amazing person who works each day to bring a smile to those around him and to ‘catch them being good.’ We are proud of Mike’s well-deserved recognition as FCPS Teacher of the Year and finalist for Maryland’s Teacher of the Year.”

Franklin recognizes the value of providing students with positive reinforcement: “I believe in celebrating successes daily. I’ve seen the power of a compliment or a simple positive phone call home to let the parents know their child is awesome.”

Finalists are selected by a panel of judges from a number of key Maryland education organizations, representing principals, teachers, school boards, teacher unions, parents, and higher education. The selection process is based on a rigorous set of state and national criteria that include knowledge of teacher pedagogy, community engagement, and expertise in general education topics and issues. The finalists were selected from a group of 24 local teachers of the year that represent the 24 Maryland school systems.

The 2019-2020 Maryland Teacher of the Year will be announced at the October 25, 2019, gala reception and dinner at Martin’s West in Baltimore.

Catoctin High School (CHS) and Frederick County Public Schools celebrate CHS’s own Mike Franklin, selected as a finalist for the 2019-2020 Maryland Teacher of the Year award.

by Buck Reed

If you were to make a list of iconic American dishes, you would find meatloaf nestled somewhere between hot dogs and apple crisp. A staple in almost every Yankee Doodle kitchen, meatloaf has been put through the grinder as our country went through its trials and tribulations. From Tuesday night dinner to the Blue Plate Special, meatloaf has been following us throughout history.

Meatloaf finds its roots as far back as the 5th century in Apicius, which is the oldest collection of recipes written in Rome. This recipe called for meat scraps to be mixed with fruit, nuts and seasonings. After that almost every cuisine adopted some form of finely chopped meats mixed with a form of bread or grains and bound together with milk and eggs. It was an excellent way to use up scrap meat as well as leftovers of all sorts. More importantly, it gave us a dish that helped us use up underutilized parts of the animals we relied on for sustenance and stretched a limited amount of protein into a full meal.

In America, it was the Germans who brought the idea of a meat starch mixture to the Colonial era in the form of scrapple, The first recorded recipe for the meatloaf we eat today was in the late 1870s and called for any cold meat you had around mixed with bread soaked with milk and eggs and salt, pepper and onions. But this meatloaf was strictly for breakfast, not dinner. By the 1890s meat production hit high gear and ground beef was available to every household. Although meatloaf gained a major foothold in America, it was quickly surpassed by that new up and comer—the hamburger. We Americans do love throwing over yesterdays star for a younger, prettier one.

The Depression made meatloaf, with its time-tested ability to stretch a limited amount of meat into a meal for everyone, even more popular. In 1958, a sensible time that gave us movies like Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and songs like Volare, we got a cook book called 365 ways to Cook Ground Beef which included over 70 recipes for meatloaf. How sensible they were remained to be seen as some called for the addition of mashed bananas and peach halves filled with ketchup. By this time, packaged ground meat was available in almost every market.

My personal brush with greatness did cross once with this dish in the form of a meatloaf sandwich, which was grilled leftover slices finished with barbecue sauce (Sweet Baby Ray’s) and provolone cheese on a Kaiser roll. Proving the rule that simple is good, I got a spontaneous standing ovation for that one. Which shows that even an everyday standby might yet become a superstar dish.

If you want to tell me about your meatloaf experience or have an idea for an article, please send me a note at RGuyintheKitchen@aol.com.

Part 4: Vengeance

Story Written by James Rada, Jr.

“The Anger of Innocence” is a six-part original serial set in the Graceham area during 1973. Serialized fiction is something that older newspapers often did as an additional way to entertain their readers. We thought it was about time for serial to make a comeback. Let us know what you think.

Thirteen-year-old Sarah Adelsberger sat in silence beside her Aunt Anna as Anna drove her new corvette along Main Street in Thurmont. Sarah had always enjoyed driving in her aunt’s flashy cars, but not this morning.

The principal at Thurmont Middle School had suspended Sarah for three days for backtalking and being insubordinate to Mrs. Zentz, her science teacher. The principal told Sarah she needed to calm down and get her priorities straight. She also had to apologize to Mrs. Zentz when Sarah returned to school.

That would not happen, no matter how long they kept her out of school.

Aunt Anna had picked Sarah up from school because Sarah’s mother worked in Frederick and couldn’t leave early. Her parents would have plenty of time to yell at her this evening, and Sarah had no doubt she would be grounded, too.

“Do you want to talk about it?” Aunt Anna asked.

“So, if I’ve got this great power, why didn’t it protect me from getting suspended?” Sarah asked.

Her aunt had told her weeks ago that Sarah had some sort of power like a witch, but not a witch. Sarah wouldn’t have believed her except for the birds she had apparently summoned to attack Christine Weber. The birds had kept coming to Graceham even after the attack, and now the tiny town had millions of birds living in it.

“Maybe it will protect you,” Aunt Anna said.

Sarah stared out the side window at the houses whizzing by. “How? I’ve been suspended already.”

“But you aren’t in danger from it…at least not yet.”

Sarah turned to face her aunt. “So the power only protects me when I’m in danger?”

“Yes.”

“Who decides when I’m in danger? The power?”

“You do.”

“If I decided, then I wouldn’t have been suspended. Mrs. Zentz would be…”

“Would be what?”

Sarah shrugged. “Nothing.” Dead. She had been about to say, “Mrs. Zentz would be dead.” Sarah didn’t really feel that way, did she? She didn’t like Mrs. Zentz, but the teacher had done nothing so bad Sarah should want her dead. What was wrong with her to think that?

“The power is strong in our family,” Anna said. “Not everyone has it, but all those who have it are women.”

Sarah frowned. “Am I a witch?”

“Yes, I guess you could call us that, but we’re not quite witches in the way most women who practice witchcraft nowadays are.”

“Why?”

“So many of them don’t have the power. They are seeking it, but if they don’t have it, they won’t gain it. Our numbers have been growing because of the women’s liberation movement, but more of those women becoming witches are angry feminists rather than true witches.”

Sarah cocked her head to the side. “And we’re real witches.” It was a statement rather than a question.

“Yes, and if you choose, you can use your power to do good and protect yourself from those who have wronged you. Who has wronged you, Sarah? Who can you use your power against?” Anna asked.

“Does it always have to be against someone?”

Anna smiled. “Oh, yes, the only way to grow your power is to use it to dominate others.”

Sarah’s brow furrowed. That didn’t sound right.

“I’ve been dreaming about Mrs. Zentz since Christine disappeared,” Sarah said. “At first, we just argued. Now we fight in the dreams. I think she wants to kill me.”

“She’s your science teacher, isn’t she?”

Sarah nodded.

“And she’s the reason you’re suspended?”

Sarah nodded again.

“Then I think your dreams are showing you how your power can help.”

Sarah’s brow furrowed. “By getting in a fight with her?”

“Not literally showing you, but it’s showing you your power can help you like it did with Christine.”

Her aunt made the S-turn near the Moravian Church, which pushed Sarah against the door so that she was staring at the old church. She felt a wave of guilt.

“I don’t know how I did that,” Sarah said. “It scared me.”

“You thought about her. You focused on her so your power could focus on her. Then you got rid of the problem.”

Sarah’s parents grounded her for a week and gave her extra chores as punishment. They also agreed with the principal. Sarah had to apologize to Mrs. Zentz.

On the last night of her suspension, Sarah dreamed of Mrs. Zentz again. They fought, but this time, Sarah killed her. As Sarah choked Mrs. Zentz to death, Sarah felt happy, euphoric even. When she woke up, she still felt ecstatic. The feeling disappeared when her mother drove her to school, and Sarah had to apologize to Mrs. Zentz. Rather than shake the teacher’s hand, Sarah wanted to lunge at her and choke her. The feeling frightened her.

Sarah seethed throughout the day. It wasn’t right that she should have to apologize. She had already been punished.

When the school day ended, Sarah rode the school bus home. However, she didn’t get off at her stop. She continued on to Rocky Ridge, which is where Mrs. Zentz lived. Sarah had found her teacher’s address in the telephone book. Sarah walked to the side of the small rancher so that she couldn’t be seen from the driveway.

Think about her. Focus on her, Aunt Anna had said.

Mrs. Zentz got home around 4:15 p.m. Sarah watched her car turn onto the driveway. She tried to stare at Mrs. Zentz through the front window of her Volkswagen Beetle, but the sun reflected off of it.

Think. Watch. Focus.

Sarah watched the birds flying towards her from all directions – crows, blackbirds, cowbirds, starlings, grackles. They landed and moved in close together to form a wide band of feathers around Mrs. Zentz and her car.

The car door opened and Mrs. Zentz stepped out. She looked at the staring birds and then glanced around. Was she looking for more birds or someone to help her?

Unconcerned, Mrs. Zentz started to walk toward her front door. The birds parted before her, but they weren’t hopping away. They toppled over and slid out of the way without Mrs. Zentz even touching them.

More birds arrived and flew at the teacher, but they seemed to bounce off an unseen wall and fall to the ground. Another flock flew in and was rebuffed, but Sarah could see Mrs. Zentz was sweating. Whatever she was doing to keep the birds away was wearing her down.

Think. Watch. Focus.

More birds arrived and swirled around Mrs. Zentz. Then the birds flew up and joined the melee. Sarah couldn’t see the teacher any longer. Too many birds were moving too fast.

Then the birds scattered, and like Christine, Mrs. Zentz was nowhere to be seen.

Sarah came out from her hiding place and walked over to where Mrs. Zentz had been standing. She saw no blood or scraps of material, but she also saw no sign of Mrs. Zentz.

What she did see was a patch of dirt. The grass had been pulled up to expose the dirt. A set of seven symbols had been drawn in the dirt in a circle. Nothing like that had happened when the birds attacked Christine.

What did they mean? They weren’t letters. Sarah had never seen anything like them.

Something told her they were wrong. They shouldn’t be here. They hadn’t been here before Mrs. Zentz came home. Now that they were, all Sarah knew was that they shouldn’t be.