Currently viewing the tag: "emmitsburg"

by James Rada, Jr.

Emmitsburg

Face Mask Restrictions Loosen at Town Pool

The Emmitsburg Commissioners voted not to require face masks be worn inside the bathhouse at the town pool this season. However, pool personnel may still be seen wearing masks as they interact with visitors.

Town Approves Agreements to Move Irishtown Road Work Forward

The Emmitsburg Commissioners approved a Road Transfer Memorandum of Understanding with Frederick County for Irishtown Road and approved Brookfield Lots 1-19 Irishtown Road project’s right-of-way, temporary grading easement, and public works agreements. These agreements allow the town to take over Irishtown Road so that housing developers can move forward in bringing the road up to town standards.

New Committee Members Named

The Emmitsburg Commissioners re-appointed Wendy Walsh (term ending February 2, 2022), Wayne Slaughter (term ending October 15, 2022), Tricia Sheppard (term ending July 15, 2023), Will Sheppard (term ending July 15, 2023), and Conrad Weaver (term ending July 15, 2023) to the Citizen’s Advisory Committee for two-year terms.

Kevin Hagan was appointed to a five-year term as an alternate to the Planning Commission ending June 7, 2026.

Pavilion Bid Approved

The Emmitsburg Commissioners approved a bid for a small pavilion in the E. Eugene Myers Community near the bandstand. Green Sites, LLC, of Elkridge will build 8 x 8 foot pavilions for $12,750. Program Open Space funds will pay for this project.

Town Applying for Federal Assistance With USDA Rural Development

Emmitsburg is eligible for federal assistance from the U.S Department of Agriculture Community Facility Disaster Grant Program. Town staff identified $285,500 in public works equipment purchases that could be made under the program. If the funding is approved, USDA will pay 55 percent of the costs, leaving $128,500 for the town to pay.

Thurmont

Trail Paving Bids Approved

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners unanimously approved a bid to pave the Eyler Road Park Trail and Thurmont Trolley Trail Extension. Town staff will do the grading and stone work on the projects, and American Asphalt Paving Company in Baltimore will do the asphalt overlay for $47,835 ($15,000 for the Trolley Trail and $32,835 for Eyler Road Park Trail).

Water and Sewer Main Work Approved   

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners approved a bid of $163,000 to have Arro Consulting of Frederick do the design and engineering work to replace the water and sewer mains along North Church Street. The project will be paid for with budgeted funds in the water budget and surplus funds in the sewer budget. Chief Administrative Officer Jim Humerick said he hopes the town will be able to reimburse those expenses with the federal American Recovery funds Thurmont is expected to receive.

Thurmont Gets Program Open Space Funding

Thurmont Mayor John Kinnaird updated the commissioners on the amount of Program Open Space funding the town would receive for projects this year. Frederick County municipalities had $771,860 in funding to divide among municipal park projects, with half designated for acquisition and half for development. Thurmont received $125,000 in acquisition funding, which is the amount it sought, and $40,000 in development funding, which was $3,750 short of what it sought. The funds will provide a 75 percent match to town funding for multiple projects.

A Day in the Park Returns

Thurmont’s summer park program, A Day in the Park, is returning this summer and will run July 26 through July 30, from 8:30 a.m. to noon, in Community Park. Enrollment will be limited to 30 children. The town will also offer an alternative program if parents don’t want their children participating in in-person activities.

Emmitsburg

Mayor Don Briggs

June has been special with the swiveling three-season weather experience. The next generation of homeowners are now settling in throughout the town. Included are the families purchasing the new homes that will finish out the Brookfield subdivision. Their settlements started in June and are queued throughout the summer and fall. With the completion of the buildout in the subdivision will come the completion of the necessary upgrades to Irishtown Road to permit opening Brookfield Drive onto Irishtown Road to two-way traffic. The road work is expected to be completed before Labor Day.

To our new neighbors, welcome to Emmitsburg, a place settled in pre-Revolutionary War times. Indeed, history has been very kind and generous to us. Our heritage includes Main Street being a primary western migration route for the early settlers. The place where master craftsman John Armstrong made signature Kentucky Long Rifles at the turn of the nineteenth century. Later, to where thousands of Union soldiers encamped and were nourished before moving on to Gettysburg. The town is the seat of mercy from which the Daughters of Charity went the ensuing days to tend to those wounded in the Battle of Gettysburg.

To the prestige embodied, the town, being recognized as a National Register of Historic Places, has picked up the monikers of “Fire Town” and “Green Town.”

It is left to wonder what those who formed our history would say to a town being a regional leader in the use of renewable energy. What we did eight years ago is where most of the country must go. The town has an electric car, four electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, solar-powered algae control at the town lake, and 94 percent of our town government energy needs are provided by renewable solar power. But, they still would recognize a quiet town idyllically set amid a natural balance of mountains, farmland, and streams absorbing what comes their way. Earlier this year, Emmitsburg was recognized as being one of the top ten most beautiful small towns in Maryland.

Today, unlike in the past, residents go about their “day to days” amidst their daily scurries and interactions at our restaurants, three museums and four archives, the world’s most visited fire house: Vigilant Hose Company, the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Shrine and Basilica, the Homeland Security/Fire Academy facility, the Fallen Firefighters Memorial, the Grotto of Lourdes, and Mount St. Mary’s University, hosting over 400,000 visitors a year. All cylinders running 24/7/365. We welcome you, as we do the streams of returning university students, alums, firefighters, and winter-season skiers on their way to and from the nearby Ski Liberty.

Our history is harrowed deep from what those before us did and left. Like them, we are day-in, day-out committed to growing the quality of life in Emmitsburg.

 Emmitsburg is a great place to live, work, and visit. Join us. Your choice, step back in time, follow the wayside exhibits or step into the future forward in a regionally recognized sustainable leading community. Embody it; let its place speak to you.

Maybe this is your first experience of the Emmitsburg annual Community Heritage Day festivities and parade, do not stop now, go to the pool, farmer’s market, library, dog walk, or just step out your front door and take a leisurely walk.

To all: Best wishes for a wonderful 4th of July.

Thurmont

 Mayor John Kinnaird

First, I want to congratulate the Catoctin High School Cougars Baseball Team for their 1A State Championship win. We are all extremely proud of this amazing accomplishment!

We will see the 2021 Guardian Hose Company Carnival in Thurmont on July 6-10. After over a year of COVID-19 cancelations, it will be great to get back to the GHC Carnival. Be sure to get out and enjoy the amazing selection of food, rides, games, and entertainment. Karen and I are looking forward to attending and meeting friends and family for a great evening. I will be providing several all-you-can-ride tickets for kids during the carnival; be sure to check my Facebook page each day of the carnival for details.

As we all know, Governor Hogan has lifted the State of Emergency for Maryland residents and businesses as of July 1. This action removes the remaining restrictions on masks, gatherings, and social restrictions. Please note that individual businesses can still request face masks. With the help of the vaccination, we are past the most critical months and can look forward to decreasing cases of COVID-19. The Town of Thurmont and the Frederick County Health Department are offering free COVID-19 vaccinations every Friday evening, from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at the Town Office parking lot. Please take advantage of the free vaccinations if you have not already received a vaccination.

The Thurmont Skate Park is getting closer to reality! I recently acquired $40,000 in Open Space Funding for developing the skate park. We had requested $43,750, and I was extremely pleased to bring home 40K! I want to thank the teens and adults in the Skate Park Commission for pressing forward with this project. They have secured financial support from many donors. They are also selling T-shirts and raffle chances on two amazing skateboards. There has been a skate park booth at the Main Street Farmers Market where you can buy chances and shirts, make a donation, or chat with the kids. Project Open Space Funding comes from the State of Maryland through Frederick County. The County is awarded funds that the County can split with all the municipalities. Municipal leaders gather and decide how the funds are invested. Each municipality can request funds for the acquisition of park property and funds for development. The funds are generally split equally between acquisition and development; this year, there was almost $400,000 available for each. I was able to get acquisition funding for two properties we are considering.

The Town of Thurmont welcomed two new businesses to Main Street on June 19. KTS Mental Health Group opened its Thurmont practice at 5B East Main Street. They specialize in children and family mental health. Cuddles Cat Rescue opened at their new location at 3 East Main Street. Cuddles Cat Rescue is a non-profit, all-volunteer organization dedicated to humanely reducing the feral and stray cat population in the Thurmont area.

School is out for summer, and our kids will be out and about playing and visiting friends. Be sure to be on the lookout for kids crossing our streets or riding bikes and skateboards. They are not always aware of their surroundings, so we need to be extra careful while driving. The kids are out having fun, so let’s take the extra time necessary to make sure they stay safe.

As has been the practice for many years, the Thurmont Board of Commissioners will have only one meeting in July. The meeting will be on Tuesday, July 27, at 7:00 p.m. The regular schedule of weekly meetings will resume on July 27. Please feel free to contact us during July. The Town Office and staff will be operational on their regular schedule the entire month.

I hope that families going on vacation this month have a great time. We all need some time off and the opportunity to get away for a few days!

Questions, comments, or suggestions? Please call me at 301-606-9458 or contact me by email at jkinnaird@thurmont.com You can also follow me on Facebook at www.facebook.com/john.kinnaird.3.

Blair Garrett

Emmitsburg has a new face in town, with Mason Dixon Mixin shaking up how we see sweets.

Mason Dixon Mixin’s grand-opening weekend kicked off with a bang on Saturday, June 19, putting a new spin on healthy gourmet shakes.

Excited first-time customers packed the house, eager to try some of the team’s fun new drinks.

From energy teas to decadent red-velvet smoothies, the variety of options is vast and there is something for the whole family. With over 40 flavors to enjoy, you may never run out of sweet options to perk up your morning.

The group prides themselves on making picturesque smoothies and drinks with health-boosting effects, and Emmitsburg’s premier juice bar is ready to take off. All of their smoothies are under 250 calories, have 24g of plant-based protein, are low in sugar/carbs, and have 21 essential vitamins and minerals in them. They are nutritious and delicious!

Mason Dixon Mixin is located at 101 Silo Hill Road in Emmitsburg. You can catch them throughout the week, from 6:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturdays.

Mason Dixon Mixin has a hugely successful grand opening, giving Emmitsburg a much-needed sweet-treat shop. Pictured is owner Kelly Moreland (right) with Joyce Kidwell (left).

Photo by Blair Garrett

written by James Rada, Jr.

A new serial fiction romance story for your enjoyment

6: A Life to Live

Margaret Rosensteel walked home to the family farm west of Emmitsburg. She walked in a daze, stunned at what Mrs. Sachs had said to her about not being able to see Caleb Sachs. How could Caleb’s mother say Margaret wasn’t good enough for her son? Margaret was a good person. She and Caleb were just friends. Well, maybe there was more there, but they hadn’t explored the possibility. They hadn’t the chance. Everyone was against them. Did they see something between her and Caleb that they didn’t see?

Margaret hadn’t taken an interest in a boy in quite a while. She avoided those feelings. Her interest in Caleb had just snuck up on her, but it seemed like she wasn’t the only one with a destiny, at least according to Mrs. Sachs.

Dinner was quiet. No one said much except for the younger children. Margaret’s parents kept looking at each other. After dinner was finished and the dishes washed, Margaret’s parents called her into the parlor.

“We need to talk to you about a decision we’ve made,” Samuel Rosensteel said. Margaret’s mother laid a hand on her husband’s shoulder. “But first, we want you to know that we think nothing inappropriate happened.”

Inappropriate? So were her parents now going to come out against her and Caleb?

Her father said, “That’s right. We know you’re a good girl, but nothing can come of this relationship between you and Caleb Sachs.”

“What relationship?” Margaret asked. “I admit I like him, but we only met for the first time at the dance.”

“Well, that’s fine. Then this shouldn’t be a problem for you. Your life has been committed to God, so we have decided to send you to the sisters early.”

Margaret jumped up. “What?”

“You are getting to the age where boys can turn your head. Your brothers and sisters certainly seem to think you’ve taken an interest in Caleb. Sending you away now will avoid that problem.”

Margaret nodded. “I understand… but I’m not sure I want to go.”

“That’s why we’re sending you away. You’re letting your emotions get the better of you.”

Margaret shook her head. She stood up and left the house for a second time today without a word. Outside, she ran off into the fields. She didn’t know where she was going. She didn’t care. She just wanted to get away.

When she tired of running, she started walking until she reached Gettysburg Road. She turned south and headed into town. She saw St. Joseph’s Church and went inside.

It was dim, except near the front of the church where candles burned. She walked up to the first pew, genuflected, and slid into the seat. Then she bowed her head and prayed. She needed help. She didn’t understand what was going on, not with Caleb, not with everyone else. What should she do?

Rosa Sachs walked upstairs to Caleb’s bedroom. He was sitting on the edge of his bed, staring out his window. He wasn’t looking at anything in the street, just staring off into the distance.

“Caleb, how are you feeling?” Rosa asked.

Caleb looked over his shoulder. “I’m sore, but I’ll be fine.”

“We should call the sheriff.”

“Why? I don’t know who did this to me.”

“I think you do.” She paused. “Even so, I know who they were. We can’t go around letting men beat up children.”

“How do you know?”

“That girl you’re mooning over came to see how you were.”

Caleb stood up. “Why didn’t you tell me?”

“Because she’s not the girl for you. I told her the same thing I told you. She’s not Jewish, so she won’t be marrying you.”

Caleb shook his head. “You’re putting the cart before the horse.”

“I am not.”

“I don’t know what life has in store for me. It’s not like I’m on a train going along a fixed path where the destination is the most important thing. I want to enjoy the journey and explore my life.”

His mother scoffed. “And you want to explore it with that girl? She’ll lead you in the wrong direction.”

“How do you know that? How do you know what my life is going to be? It’s my life, and I don’t know. You’re no better than her brothers. They tried to scare me off. You tried to scare her off. What is everyone so afraid of? That we’ll be happy?”

“Happy? You will be miserable. Both of you. That’s what we want to help you avoid,” Rosa said.

“I like her. I like her a lot. I want to spend time with her. I don’t know if I love her, but I suspect I might. If not now, certainly in the future.”

“And what has that brought you? A beating. Arguments with your mother who loves you.”

“Neither of which I caused.”

He sat back down and stared back out the window. Rosa stared at him for a few moments more and then turned and left.

Caleb walked into a church for the first time. Only a few people filled the pews, and he quickly found Margaret near the front. He walked up the aisle and sat down next to her. He said nothing because it looked like she was praying.

She finished and looked up.

“Caleb, what are you doing here?”

“I figured you might be here after what my mother said to you.”

Margaret frowned. “Not just her. My parents want to send me to sisters early.”

“Because of me?”

She nodded. “Are we wrong?”

“Does it feel wrong?”

She shook her head. “No.”

He took her hand in his. “Then I don’t think it’s wrong. It’s not easy, but no one has had it easy since Adam and Eve were cast out of the Garden of Eden.”

“But everything is so confusing now. It seems like everyone is against us.”

She leaned her head on his shoulder.

“I saw you praying,” Caleb said. “Did it help?”

“Not yet.”

“I want you to know that I won’t hold you back from your promise, but while you’re still free, I want to be with you and get to know you better. I want to have lots of wonderful memories to look back on and comfort me after you leave.”

“But it would break my heart,” Margaret said.

“And mine, too. I think that will tell me it’s worth it. If you were to leave, and I felt nothing, it would be like I had nothing invested in our relationship. I’m willing to hurt for a long time if it means I can be truly happy for a short time with you.”

She stared at him, her eyes glistening with tears. She nodded. “Yes.”

He smiled. Then he leaned down and kissed her. He pulled back, smiling.

“I said what I needed to say. I’ll leave you to your praying now,” Caleb told her.

He got up and left the church.

Father Harmon stood up from the pew where he had been sitting and doing his own praying. He walked over to where Margaret sat. She looked up, a bit startled.

“Forgive me, Margaret. I didn’t want to intrude.”

“You heard me talking with Caleb?”

He nodded. “Yes. Well, the young man has stated his intentions. Now the decision is yours.”

“What should I do?”

He motioned to the pew. “May I sit?”

“Please.”

The priest sat down and leaned against the back of the pew. “You have two admirable choices: Become a Daughter of Charity and be married to God or become a wife and raise a family in faith.”

“We haven’t talked about marriage. We barely know each other.”

“That may be true, but if it is, why does the decision trouble you? Your choice would be between an honorable life of service and a relationship you don’t think will last.”

“I don’t know how my life will be if I stay for him, but I do know what it will be like with the sisters.”

Father Harmon nodded. “Do you believe in Jesus?”

“Yes, Father, of course.”

“Well, he was a Jew. So loving a Jew must not be a sin, and I know your particular Jew. He is a good boy from a good family. If you were not committed to the sisters, your family might not worry.”

“But his family…”

Father Martin nodded. “Yes, that could be a problem, but those types of problems often resolve themselves, particularly when grandchildren come along.”

Margaret gasped. “Father, you have me married with children, and I don’t even know if I love him.”

“Then you need to decide that.”

“But would it be fair to get involved with him and then leave him?”

“Would it be fair to commit yourself to the Daughters with unresolved feelings? You must make that decision. That is why we are given life on earth, to make decisions and hopefully make the correct ones.”

Hot Weather Safety Tips for Our Furry Friends

Give them plenty of fresh, clean water. Pets can get dehydrated quickly. Make sure they have some shade. Your pet needs to have a shady place to get out of the sun and take a break from the heat. Don’t over-exercise them. When it’s hot out, shorten your walk or make sure you give your best buddy breaks in the shade during exercise. Keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot. Maybe take your walk in the evening when it cools down a bit. Your furry friend will thank you. It’s important to know the symptoms of overheating in pets: excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor, or even collapse. Symptoms can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea, and vomit, along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees.

And, of course, never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle in the summer heat.

Our pets love being with us all the time, even when it’s hot and uncomfortable for them outside. They will never complain! So, let’s make sure we keep them safe and happy outdoors during the summer.

Emmitsburg

Mayor Don Briggs

With each spring comes not only warmer longer days but also preparation of the next year’s town budget. The town fiscal year does not run concurrent with a calendar year. The next year budget period, 2021-2022, starts on July 1 and ends June 30. The different cycle gives the town, like most towns and cities, time to prepare during the closing months that is generally a time of slower activity barring another pandemic. The town has a General Fund account, and separate Enterprise Funds for water and sewer that must come to a performance balance between revenues and expenses. Coming through a pandemic affected year at times presented challenges to our resources to meet expected services. We bent but did not break. Thank you to the staff with their years of public service experience.

Traditional graduations are beginning to, yes, happen. A gold rush. Masks are being shed. Opportunities to attend graduation are opening for more people to attend. I attended the Mount St. Mary’s University 2021 class graduation. It was held outside at Waldron Stadium. The graduation was broken into four parts, two on Saturday and two on Sunday. Masks were optional, noticeably social distancing was reduced. The stadium was near capacity with family members and friends of graduates.

On the last Saturday of June, as is the tradition, the 39th Annual Community Heritage Day will be held in the Eugene Myers Community Park. Starting time is 9:00 a.m. for a full day of games, crafts, music, food, free swimming, open disc golf tournament, and biking event. The parade down W. Main Street and South Seton Avenue is planned to start at 5:00 p.m. Then, back to the park for more activities. Fireworks start at 9:45 p.m. Thank you to the Lions Club and other volunteers for putting the celebration together. As always, thank you to the town staff for all the behind-the-scenes work, and the town businesses and residents for donations. Every year, the town budget supports funding for the fireworks.

Over the last two years, the town has been bombarded with interest in the development of property within the town corporate boundary and properties identified within the current town comprehensive plan approved growth boundaries. Within our town limits, there are about 24 remaining lots in Brookfield, including lots facing on Irishtown Road. That is all the new homes projected to be completed this year. There is a yet-to-be-approved 48-unit subdivision along Irishtown Road that may start this fall, potentially delivering homes in 2022. There have been some discussions on annexations, but none are in the planning process.

This year, Memorial Day falls on Monday, May 31. A special day, “honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military.” Look for the flags in the cemeteries you may per chance pass by. They stand for a lot.

Flag Day is the quiet observation celebrated annually on June 14. The event is held interchangeably by the towns of Emmitsburg and Thurmont, alternating every other year. American Legion, VFW, and American Veterans (AMVETS) from both towns co-host the event. This year, the commemoration will be held in Thurmont. The observance was officially noted by proclamation by President Woodrow Wilson in 1917. The flag design was adopted by second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. In 1949, Flag Day was officially recognized but not as a federal holiday by Congress. This is the one event where old flags may be burned. The Boy Scout troops from each town do that for us.

Happy Fourth of July. It’s finally, summer, a well-earned one it will be.

Thurmont

 Mayor John Kinnaird

With the recent and unexpected changes to masking requirements, we may feel like jumping back into life with both feet. Even with these new changes, we still need to think about our family, friends, and neighbors. The new rulings allow those who have been vaccinated more opportunities to get out and mix with others. Those who have not been vaccinated are asked to continue wearing masks at this time. As we move forward, many who have been vaccinated may continue to wear masks; please do not be critical of their decision. Those who have chosen not to get vaccinated should be sure to follow the guidelines when interacting with others. It has been a tough year, and it looks like we can see the light at the end of the tunnel. At this time, it is important that we continue to follow the guidelines and help ensure the safety of our family, friends, and neighbors.

I am happy to announce that the Guardian Hose Company is planning their 2021 Carnival for Tuesday, July 6 through Saturday, July 10. The carnival will be open from 5:00-10:30 p.m. If you are like me, I am looking forward to the great food, fun games, and getting to see family and friends. Sadly, there will be no parade this year. The Guardian Hose Company Carnival will be held at the GHC Carnival Grounds, 123 East Main Street, Thurmont. Parking is available at the Boundary Avenue entrance. Be sure to come out and support the Guardian Hose Company Carnival.

The Thurmont Community Ambulance Service will be holding its carnival from Tuesday, June 1 through Saturday, June 5. There will be entertainment each evening, with plenty of good food, rides, games, and raffles. A nightly buffet will be available for $15.00 and will be served from 5:00-7:00 p.m., daily. Entertainment includes the Taylor Brown Elvis Show on Tuesday, Open Road Band on Wednesday, Full Effect on Thursday, The Rock and Roll Relics on Friday, and Borderline on Saturday. The Thurmont Community Ambulance Service Carnival will be held at the Thurmont Event Complex, 13716 Strafford Drive, Thurmont. I will see you there!

This fall, we will be having Colorfest on October 9-10! Be sure to keep an eye out for more information as we finalize plans for this long-standing community event. Colorfest is the single, biggest fundraising opportunity for our local churches, civic organizations, and non-profits. The past year has been a difficult time for many organizations, and I hope Colorfest will help kick-start their fundraising.

I want to remind everyone to sign up for the Town and Main Street newsletter. We are switching to an electronic version soon, so be sure to sign up now. Email kschildt@thurmontstaff.com and ask to be added to the email list. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose. Print copies of the newsletter will be available at the town office and other locations.

Again, it is important that we continue to follow the COVID-19 guidelines and help ensure the safety of our family, friends, and neighbors.

I can be reached by cell phone at 301-606-9458 or by email a jkinnaird@thurmont.com.

by James Rada, Jr.

Emmitsburg

For more information on the Town of Emmitsburg, visit www.emmitsburgmd.gov or call 301-600-6300.

Budget to be Approved in June

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners is expected to approve the budget for Fiscal Year 2022, which starts July 1, this month. The $1,907,086 budget shows a 2 percent increase. The property tax rate of 36 cents/$100 assessed value is the primary funding source for the budget, and it remains the same.

Town staff had budgeted $275,000 for two community deputies, but contract from the Frederick County Sheriff’s Office arrived shortly before the budget presentation for $298,000 (an 8.5 percent increase). Because this was unforeseen, staff will need to adjust other areas of the budget, particularly capital projects, to make up the difference without increasing the overall budget.

In some of the other highlighted areas of the budget, streets will increase 7 percent, trash collection will increase 5 percent, and parks and recreation will increase 1 percent.

Commissioners Approve New Trash Collection Contract

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners has approved a three-year contract with Republic Services in Frederick for trash removal. The bid amount was for $5.74/unit/month, $145 per dumpster collected, and $.55 unit/occurrence.

Town Election Laws Updated

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners voted 4-1 to approve changes to election laws updating such things as times of election, various deadlines for absentee voting, and filing deadlines. Commissioner Joe Ritz, III, voted against the changes because one change would have candidates listed alphabetically, rather than by who filed first, which has traditionally been the case.

Commissioners Approve Sewer Agreement with Rutter’s

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners approved a public works agreement with M&G Realty and SPT Land, who are developing a site for a new Rutter’s store. The agreement outlines what is expected before the town will accept a new sewage pump station and associated sewer infrastructure. The agreement was accepted on the condition that a minor modification might need to be made if the developers request it.

Thurmont

For more information on the Town of Thurmont, visit www.thurmont.com or call 301-271-7313.

Town Preparing to Approve Budget

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners are expected to approve the budget for Fiscal Year 2022, which starts July 1, this month. The $4,480,309 budget has $4,301,747 in expenditures and $178,562 in the capital budget. This is about $18,000 less than the FY2021 budget. The property tax rate of 29.92 cents/$100 assessed value is the primary funding source for the budget, and it remains the same as it has for the previous two years.

New Ball Field Plans Presented

ARRO Consulting presented the preliminary plans for a new baseball field in East End Park to the Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners recently. The field is needed because as Thurmont Little League grows it is becoming harder to accommodate games and practices in town.

Thurmont Chief Administrative Officer Jim Humerick told the commissioners, “Last year, if they would have had a complete season, Thurmont Little League were prepared to play in Emmitsburg because all the fields were full down here.” He used Program Open Space funds to have the engineering work done.

Besides two ball fields, the plan includes a 24-foot-wide access drive, walkways, and 37-spot parking lot. The projected cost for construction is almost $262,000 with the plan for Program Open Space funds to pay for it. There is also a planned future expansion for a multi-use field.

Colorfest Returns

After being canceled last year due to COVID-19 restrictions, Colorfest will return on October 9-10 this year. The festival attracts over 100,000 to Thurmont during the weekend, so it was impossible to maintain social distancing last year. The festival is a major fundraiser for many local organizations, and the Colorfest organization donates to many groups and funds a local scholarship.

Chief Administrative Officer Jim Humerick said he was happy to be planning for it, even if conditions change that might cause the need for cancellation.

The town pays for security, transportation, trash, and sanitation. They pay for these services with vendors and parking permits. Because things are still unknown, attendance might be down, which could lead to the town not bringing in enough money to cover its costs.

“Colorfest is so critical to a lot of our local organizations, our churches, our scouts, our service organizations like the Lions Club; we need to get back into it and take the chance that we may come up short this year,” Mayor John Kinnaird said.

He worries that if the event was canceled two years in a row, visitors and vendors might not return.

written by James Rada, Jr.

A new serial fiction romance story for your enjoyment

5: Warnings

Caleb Sachs could see Emmitsburg in the distance as he drove his wagon along the dirt road. He’d spent the day making deliveries for this father to some farmers outside of town. His father offered the service, but it fell on Caleb to make the deliveries when the orders came in.

Caleb didn’t mind it so much on a day like today, warm and sunny. It was the wintry days or rainy ones that made him miserable, although he doubted much could have made him miserable today.

He was head over heels… what? In love? He wasn’t sure about that, but he definitely liked Margaret Rosensteel more than any other girl he had ever met. She understood what he was feeling, and she had had a great sense of humor. It didn’t hurt that she was also pretty.

He was so lost in his thoughts, he let the horses drive themselves back to town.

Two men on horses rode up on either side of the wagon and stopped the horses.

“What’s going on?” Caleb said. Then he recognized the two men as Margaret’s older brothers, Jack and Paul Rosensteel.

“We need to talk,” Jack said.

“Then ride along beside me. I need to get home,” Caleb replied.

The older men didn’t let go of Caleb’s horse, nor did they start walking alongside the wagon.

“People saw you and Margaret on the hill north of town yesterday,” Jack said.

Caleb shrugged. “So? We did nothing wrong. We were right out in the open where anyone could see us.”

“You need to stay away from her,” Paul said. “She has bigger plans for this life than being with a cheating shopkeeper’s son.”

Caleb wasn’t sure what angered him more: that these men had called his father a cheater or that they thought Caleb wasn’t good enough for their sister.

“I’d say that’s for Margaret and me to decide. It’s none of your business.” He picked up the reins and clucked at the horses, but the Rosensteel brothers held onto them.

“She’s our sister, so that makes it our business,” Paul told him.

“I’m not talking about this with you,” Caleb said. “Now let go of my horses.”

Jack poked Caleb in the shoulder. “We aren’t going to talk with you about it. We’re warning you. Stay away from Margaret.” He poked Caleb again, and Caleb knocked the hand aside.

“Get out of my way,” he said.

Caleb reached out to slap Paul’s horse on the rump so that Caleb could get the wagon moving. Paul grabbed his arm and yanked, pulling Caleb off the wagon. Caleb fell onto the road as Paul laughed. Caleb jumped up and pulled the bigger man off his horse.

“Not so funny now, is it?” Caleb said.

Jack rode his horse around the wagon and kicked Caleb, sending him sprawling. Then he jumped from the horse. Jack grabbed Caleb by the shirt and punched him in the stomach and the face.

“Some people just have to learn the hard way,” Jack said.

Paul jumped up and landed a few punches of his own. Caleb tried to defend himself, but these men were taller and heavier than he was. He hit back, but his punches didn’t seem to hurt them. They pounded him to the ground, and Caleb rolled under the wagon to shield himself.

The brothers mounted their horses, and Jack said, “You’ll get more of that if you don’t leave her alone.”

Then they rode off.

Caleb hoped he could sneak in the back of the store and up to his room before anyone saw him. His mother happened to be retrieving something in the back room when he came in.

“Caleb! What happened?” She rushed over to him. “Are you all right? Do you need a doctor?”

Caleb shook his head. “I’m fine, Mother. I just came out on the wrong end of a fight.”

“A fight! Why were you fighting? With whom?”

She grabbed a towel off the shelf. She pumped water into the sink, then soaked the cloth, wrung it out, and wiped at Caleb’s face.

He tried to shake off her ministrations. “It doesn’t matter. I just want to lie down for a little while.”

He could name Jack and Paul as his attackers. What good would it accomplish? They might get in trouble, but how would that make Margaret feel? Word would get out about him and Margaret, and it might damage her reputation or get her in trouble with her father.

“Who were you fighting?” his mother asked.

“It doesn’t matter. Some of the boys were roughhousing, and things just got out of hand. I landed my own punches.”

He hadn’t, but it made him sound like he was just as much to blame. His mother couldn’t get his attackers in trouble without getting him in trouble.

He walked upstairs, holding the towel to his face.

Margaret was kneading dough in the kitchen when her brothers came in. They were in a good mood, laughing and kissing their wives on the cheeks. They washed their hands in the sink and sat down at the table.

“You will not have to worry about that Jew boy distracting you from your calling anymore,” Paul said.

Jack elbowed his brother and glared at him.

Margaret paused. This did not sound good. “What are you talking about?”

Jack and Paul looked at each other.

“You might as well tell her. You let the cat out of the bag,” Jack said.

Paul grinned. “We gave Caleb Sachs a message to leave you alone. I think he understood.”

Margaret hefted the dough and considered throwing it at her brothers. “What did you do?”

Jack shrugged. “Nothing permanent.”

Margaret remembered how her brothers had handled the situation with Caleb’s friends at the dance. They were too eager to fight. She slapped the dough onto the table. Then she washed her hands and pulled off her apron.

“You’re not done yet,” her mother said.

“I need to go into town,” Margaret told her.

Paul said, “Don’t let her go, Mother.”

Margaret spun around. “If you did what I think you did, you had better hope the sheriff doesn’t come for you.”

“What are you talking about?” her mother asked.

“I think they beat Caleb up like they did to his friends at dance.”

“Oh, Margaret, they’re grown, married men. They know better than that.”

Margaret rolled her eyes. “Didn’t you hear what I said, Mother? They beat up Caleb’s friends at the dance. They like to fight.”

She hurried out of the house and nearly ran to town. Margaret found the store on West Main Street and walked through the door. She saw a middle-aged woman behind the counter. She must have been Caleb’s mother.

“Hello, I’m looking for Caleb,” Margaret said.

“He can’t see anyone right now.”

“I wanted to see if he was all right.”

“All right? What do you know about what happened to him?” Mrs. Sachs asked.

“Nothing for sure, but I think my brothers may have attacked him.”

“Who are you?”

“Margaret Rosensteel.”

Mrs. Sachs nodded. “Let me guess. You’re the girl who Caleb has been so interested in?”

“We met at the dance Friday.”

“I definitely do not agree with what your brothers did, but they were right in one respect: You and my Caleb can’t be together.”

Margaret felt her cheeks redden. “We’re not together.”

“Yet. Your brothers must see it in you. I can see it in Caleb. There’s more than a healthy interest. Look at what happened to him because of you. I’m sure you are a very nice girl, but you aren’t Jewish.”

“What’s wrong with that?”

“Nothing except that your children would not be Jewish. When Caleb marries, it will be to an appropriate woman. Now I think you had better go.”

Margaret’s shoulders sagged. She had thought it was only her family that wanted to keep her and Caleb apart. Was what she and Caleb wanted so wrong?

…to be continued next month

Thurmont American Legion Post 168

The American Legion family would like to extend a big shout-out to the seniors at Catoctin High School: Congratulations on your graduation! We wish the class of 2021 a happy and successful future.

Flag Day ceremonies will be held Monday, June 14, 2021, at 6:00 p.m. The location is Thurmont Memorial Park. In the United States, Flag Day is celebrated on June 14. It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States on June 14, 1777, by resolution of the Second Continental Congress. At the ceremony, flags will be disposed of properly, by having a flag burning ceremony.

The American Legion’s kitchen hours are Wednesday through Friday, from 5:00-8:00 p.m. Please join us for carryout (301-271-4411) or dine-in. Specials for the week are posted on our Facebook page: The American Legion Post 168.

Francis X Elder Post 121, Emmitsburg

Submitted by Kevin Cogan, Commander Post No. 121

Great hope and anticipation await us in June. Schools will be out for the summer, and families will be able to spend some much-needed time together in the outdoors. Enjoy this time, take in some sunshine and make note to the representation of our great country by where you might see our U.S. flag proudly displayed.

The United States flag was approved by congress as our nation’s flag on June 14, 1777.  June 14 commemorates this date as Flag Day. The colors represent: White—purity and innocence; Red—valor and bravery; and Blue—vigilance, perseverance, and justice. The stars represent the heavens and the stripes are symbolic of the rays of light streaming from the sun. Also, the stripes are our first 13 colonies. Our brave military takes hold of our U.S. flag and never desert its followers. It is a powerful symbol of our Americanism, as it represents us, the American people, and all the sacrifices good people have made to make it the great country we are able to live freely in today.

A few other dates of significance for June: June 6, 2021—Anniversary of the World War II Allied invasion in Normandy, France, known as D-Day (1944). During World War II (1939-1945), the Battle of Normandy, which lasted from June to August 1944, resulted in the Allied liberation of Western Europe from Nazi Germany’s control. The battle began on June 6, 1944, also known as D-Day, when some 156,000 American, British, and Canadian forces landed on five beaches along a 50-mile stretch of France’s Normandy region; June 20, 2021—Father’s Day. Let’s salute our military fathers and give thanks for all fathers on this day; June 25, 2021—The anniversary of the start of the Korean War (1950). It was a conflict between the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) and the Republic of Korea (South Korea). The war reached international proportions in June 1950, when North Korea, supplied and advised by the Soviet Union, invaded the South. The United Nations, with the United States as the principal participant, joined the war on the side of the South Koreans, and the People’s Republic of China came to North Korea’s aid. After more than a million combat casualties had been suffered on both sides, the fighting ended in July 1953, with Korea still divided into two hostile states. Negotiations in 1954 produced no further agreement, and the front line has been accepted ever since as the boundary between North and South Korea; June 27, 2021—National PTSD Awareness Day. National Center for PTSD help:  800-273-8255 (press “1” if you are a Veteran). Anyone who wants to learn more can visit the National Center for PTSD website at www.ptsd.va.gov.

Unit #121 ALA will be hosting Trivia Night on Friday, June 11, at 7:00 p.m., and Bingo on Saturday, June 19, at 7:00 p.m.

The SAL will host the annual fishing derby held on Sunday, June 6, at the pond on Kline Farms, located between Thurmont and Emmitsburg on Rt. 15.

Meetings are held on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, call us at 301-447-2274. Veteran regular member meetings will be held at Kumps Dam through September. 

Thank you to all who support the American Legion and our military personnel.

For God and Country!

Blair Garrett

People can be pushed to their limits doing many things.

Whether it’s submitting a treacherous mountaintop or shooting for world records, humans have a competitive tendency to push themselves past what they previously thought possible.

Competition is exciting to watch, and new challenges are always on the horizon for those who seek greatness.

Competitive eating has gained tremendous popularity over the past decade, with events like the world-famous Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest, along with Food Network show challenges putting competitive eating on the map.

There are a few great local options that present customers with a food challenge only the toughest people can conquer.

Chubby’s Barbeque

Chubby’s Barbeque in Emmitsburg has a mountainous challenge of burgers piled high.

Owner Thomas Caulfield has seen many customers attempt his notoriously difficult “Chubby’s Challenge.”

“Years and years ago, I was watching Food Network challenges on ‘Man v. Food,’ and I sat around trying to come up with something nobody could eat,’’ Caulfield said. Caulfield designed a double-stack of burgers, so tall that it would take someone of true willpower and discipline to beat it.  

“We started it with eight half-pound burgers, with a Louisiana hot link sausage on each one,” he said. “The sausage weighs right around three ounces. With two slices of cheese on it, lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise.”

It’s a meal that dwarves a normal adult’s daily caloric intake, but with a one-hour time limit, the heat is on to put down as much food as you possibly can.

“We didn’t have anybody take the challenge and win for probably over a year,” Caulfield said. “One Sunday, we had a guy walk in and say he was here for the challenge. He had a little lady with him, and he said she was going to do it.”

When we think of the stereotypical person who can put down tremendous amounts of food, it’s always a huge, corn-fed husky guy who throws bales of hay like a football for a living. Not this time.

She was maybe five feet tall, and maybe 90 pounds,” he said. “While she’s waiting for her burger challenge, she had two beers, which is just not what you want before a food challenge.” 

“She proceeds to eat it all within 45 minutes, with a smile on her face the whole time. She just went through it like she was walking through a garden,” Caulfield said.

The first person to complete the challenge was Bethesda, Maryland’s Juliet Lee, who was a world-renowned competitive eater. “She won her $100, left, and came back about an hour later and got a pulled pork sandwich, a side of Chubby potatoes, and $119 worth of food to go,” Caulfield said.

There have been just a few anomalies among the many who have taken on the Chubby’s Challenge.       

“Over the years, we’ve probably had 150 to 200 people try it, and just 6 people do it,”  

Chubby’s has had one more visit from a patron cut from a different cloth than the rest of us.

Molly Schuyler, world-record holder and competitive eating champion, made a stop at Chubby’s in 2019 to get her photo plastered behind the bartop at the restaurant.

“She did the challenge in about five minutes and 40 seconds,” Caulfield said. “After, I got her name and phone number, and I called and said, ‘I bet you can’t do two of them, and if you can, I’ll give you 500 dollars.’”

Schuyler was able to do a double Chubby’s Challenge in 29 minutes, 1 second, something most people previously thought to be impossible.

“Her boyfriend, who was also a competitive eater, ordered one of everything on the menu,” Caulfield said. “He couldn’t finish everything, so she finished what he didn’t eat [after her challenge].”

Nobody is forced to do two Chubby’s Challenges, but the option to solidify your name as Chubby’s royalty is there for the taking if you can reach it.

Bollinger’s Restaurant

Good barbecue strikes our tastebuds like nothing else out there.

There are so many choices for the cut of meat, though. You’ve got brisket, ribs, beef tips, pork, and various other options. Once you’ve had good barbecue, you crave that sweet and smoky flavor.

Bollinger’s Restaurant in Thurmont has a barbecue challenge to light up your taste buds.

“We started it about four years ago,” Bollinger’s Restaurant owner Josh Bollinger said. “It’s a sandwich and fries challenge.”

It doesn’t get much more American than a stack of meats on a bun, layered in barbecue sauce. “There’s 14 ounces of brisket, 14 ounces of ham, 14 ounces of pulled pork, and 4 ounces of coleslaw, and it has one big order of fresh-cut French fries with it,” Bollinger said.

That’s a sandwich big enough to intimidate just about any challenger. Patrons have just 20 minutes to clear their plates, and a few have risen to the occasion when faced with this monster sandwich.

“It’s roughly three-and-a-half to four pounds,” Bollinger said. “We’ve probably only had five or six people complete it. When they do complete it, it’s always under 10 minutes; they crush it.”

Winners get their meal free, a T-shirt, their picture posted up on Bollinger’s Restaurant social media, and likely tremendous indigestion for the rest of the night. Those who are strong enough to put all that food away can claim that they’ve gone where few have before them.

Bollinger has tried his own challenge to see how he measures up to the behemoth sandwich. “I was one bite away from finishing it,” he said. “My jaw hurt so bad, I couldn’t chew anymore.”

He may still take another crack at the challenge, this time with an empty stomach and the mental preparedness to overcome that much barbecue. “I might have to try it again one day, you never know.”

You don’t have to travel far to find some great food options and test your willpower at the dinner table. There are local spots to satiate the appetites of the world’s greatest food champions right here in Northern Frederick County. You just have to know where to look.

Juliet Lee of Bethesda, Maryland, a world-renowned competitive eater and the first person to complete the “Chubby’s Challenge” at Chubby’s Barbeque in Emmitsbug.

A contestant takes on two towering stacks of Chubby’s Avalanche burgers.

The Bollinger’s Restaurant challenge puts on the pressure, giving challengers just 20 minutes to finish this huge sandwich and fries.

E m m i t s b u r g

Mayor Don Briggs

Well, the vaccine shots are here. Yes, they’re at a convenient place for us up in these parts: the Vigilant Hose Company activities building on Creamery Road. Thank you, Vigilant Hose, for pulling this together. But, not so fast. The vaccine assigned was Johnson & Johnson. This vaccine type was pulled with urgency from delivery because of possibly being the cause of blood clotting to several inoculated women. To those who had signed up for shots, the Frederick County Health Department was very responsive in offering rescheduling in other parts of the county. Not so much for those who signed up, but to all those behind the scenes—and there are many—a seamless adjustment. Amazing how they do it.

This horrible virus is still with us. I’m hoping it will subside with the coming pleasant weather, much like last summer, where we spend more time outside as the healthier thing to do. Walk, jog, or bike through our connected town to our beautiful parks. Yet, still be wary, as there is again an uptick in demand for hospital beds. As of this writing, county-wide cases are up to 18,903 cases and 297 deaths. In the 21727 zip code, we have 397 cases.

The Masters Golf tournament in Augusta, Georgia…what would we do without it? Our national annual harbinger to spring, blooming, and, yes, warmth. For us morphing along in reluctant climate zones, holding fast to its tradition, it is almost a solemn event. The beautiful setting of immaculate grounds; antebellum reminiscent clubhouse; plush fairways; and landscaping, flush with blooming azaleas. I do not play golf, a youthful incurable proclivity to slice shots cut my play short. This year, the coverage by ESPN and CBS intensified the drama, with expanded coverage, drones, and exhibits, moving from player to player with fluidity, almost like watching a soccer match. As networks interpret, TV appetite screen presentations must change every seven seconds to keep the American viewers engaged. The networks did a good job keeping it moving with only a few commercials. Made it personnel.

Youth baseball in Emmitsburg is going full throttle, with many of the fields now in regular use. Weekends bring tournaments. Some pressure to other uses, but we can accommodate everything.

The Boys and Girls Club will be back this fall with expanded abilities to accommodate before- and after-school childcare. The town contributes funding to this service to the community. I will have more on this.

So fast, first crocuses, trees budding, farmers tilling, gardners planting, and seniors graduating. The buildup. Here we are. Happy Memorial Day.

T h u r m o n t

Mayor John Kinnaird

The Thurmont Main Street Farmers Market has been open for several weeks at the Thurmont Plaza Shopping Center and will be moving to its summer location at the Municipal Parking lot on May 8. The Farmers Market offers an amazing selection, including locally grown produce, homemade baked goods, fresh eggs, Red Angus beef, bacon, sausage, pork chops, fresh flowers, vegetable plants, and handcrafted items. The Farmers Market is open Saturday mornings from 9:00 a.m. until noon.

The town has several parks projects in the works! The parks crew has been working on an extension to the south end of the Thurmont Trolley Trail. The extension will carry the trail across Moser Road and down to a loop trail that will connect the trolley trail with the nature trail at the Thurmont Regional Library. A new walking trail is being added to the Eyler Road Park. This new trail encircles the lower playing fields and will provide residents with another safe walking path. Both trail improvements will be completed this summer.

The Town of Thurmont in partnership with the CYA will be building a new press box, storage area, and concession stand at the Eyler Road Park football field. This new building will replace several temporary structures and will provide additional storage and meeting space.

At the April 13th town meeting, the commissioners heard from a group of teens interested in having a skate park built in town. After a very impressive presentation, the commissioners voted to apply for Program Open Space funding to help kickstart the development of a skateboard park. This new facility may be located at the East End Park. Design recommendations will be drafted by the Parks and Recreation Commission and teen representatives of the skateboard group. During the April 20th town meeting, lifelong resident Louie Powell, Sr. spoke in favor of both the press box and the skateboard park. Mr. Powell donated to both projects and challenged everyone that uses our parks to also donate to these projects. Donations can be sent to the town office; please indicate on your check that it is intended for these projects.

The board of commissioners has been working on the Fiscal Year 2021-2022 Municipal Budget. There will be a public hearing on the budget before it is adopted. I encourage everyone to watch the town meetings as the budget is finalized. Once adopted, the budget will take effect on July 1, 2021.

Work on the Thurmont Master Plan update continues at the Planning and Zoning meetings. This process also includes comprehensive rezoning. You are welcome to attend the P&Z meetings and to provide comments on the process. There will be public hearings and presentations prior to the adoption of the Master Plan update. I hope everyone has a great May! If you have any questions, concerns, or compliments, I can be reached at 301-606-9458 or by email at jkinnaird@thurmont.com

by James Rada, Jr.

T h u rmont

A “Y Without Walls”

The Town of Thurmont is still working toward bringing YMCA programs to town in a “Y without walls.” It was announced during a recent town meeting that the Y will run some art programs locally on Saturday mornings. These are expected to be one-and-a-half and two-hour workshops. The YMCA is also planning to start a North County Leaders Club in the fall to teach youth the value of service. The long-term goal is to have a YMCA facility in town, and the first step in that direction is showing support for Y programs being offered in the “Y without walls.”

Thurmont Police Officer of the Year

The Thurmont Lions Club awarded Officer First Class Nicole Fair the 2021 Thurmont Police Officer of the Year Award. In noting the work she has done in the department since joining in July 2016, it was also noted that she has an eagerness to learn new skills and jobs within the department. Fair also received a restaurant gift certificate and her name on a plaque. Also, the Lions Club will make a $400 donation in Fair’s name to the charity of her choice.

Thurmont Pursuing a Skate Park

Following a presentation by citizens, the Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners switched their priority for Program Open Space funds this year from doing phase 2 of the Woodland Park playground replacement to the start of building a skateboarding park in town. The commissioners asked the parks and recreation commission to meet with the citizens supporting the park to decide on what the ultimate design of the park should be and how to start building it, understanding that the park probably can’t be built in a year.

E m m i t s b u r g

Commissioners Accept North Seton Conceptual Plan

Commissioners Accept North Seton Conceptual Plan

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners accepted a Green Street Conceptual Plan for North Seton Avenue, from Main Street to Provincial Parkway. Fox and Associates presented the plan. The goal is to create an attractive streetscape that incorporates green stormwater infrastructure to reduce the amount of stormwater runoff and pollution flowing into Flat Run. The plan also suggests ways to stabilize the banks of Flat Run and provide flood hazard mitigation. A Chesapeake Bay Trust Green Streets, Green Jobs, & Green Towns grant funded the study.

Commissioners Approve Hunting and Recreational Use at Rainbow Lake

The Emmitsburg Commissioners approved the hunting and recreational use of Rainbow Lake. The changes/additions will be updated on town hunting and fishing permits. Some of the changes include: (1) All-terrain vehicles, except class one pedal-assist bicycles, are prohibited in the watershed; (2) Hunting access is limited to deer and turkey. Hunting of any other wildlife species is prohibited; (3) Hunting is only permitted from the first day of deer season until the end of deer season. Hunting will then only be permitted from the first day of spring wild turkey season until the end of spring wild turkey season; (4) Use of hunting dogs to chase/hunt deer or turkey is prohibited; (5) Portable tree stands and climbing devices that do not use nails, wires, spikes, bolts, or screws for attachments are permitted; (6) Fishing permits must be renewed annually and expire on the date of your Maryland fishing license expires; (7) Please refrain from walking, standing, or throwing the rip rap rocks located around the lake basin; (8) Hiking and mountain biking are allowed on designated trails only. Trails must not be used if they are wet or muddy to protect the watershed from erosion.

Commissioners Approve Engineering Contract for Water Clarifier

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners approved the engineering contract for the new water clarifier for the town’s water system to be conducted by Rummel, Klepper & Kahl. The entire cost will be $243,114, including study, preliminary design, final design, bidding, negotiation, construction, and post-construction.

Commissioners Change Zoning for New Wastewater Treatment Plant

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners held a public hearing in April about the zoning classification changes for the parcels of property the new wastewater treatment plant will be built on. The parcels were zoned agricultural before the town annexed the parcels and sought to change them to institutional zoning. Following the hearing, the commissioners voted to make the zoning change.

Does the Town Need to Raise Water Rates?

Emmitsburg Commissioner T. J. Burns brought up the possibility of the town raising its water rates during a recent town meeting. He said the town’s water rates are among the lowest in the county, and with the need to pay for the upcoming water infrastructure projects, such as the new water clarifier, the town may have to consider raising its rates to generate income for the projects that won’t be covered by grants.

2021 Emmitsburg Pool Information

The Emmitsburg pool will open this year on May 29. It will only be open from noon to 7:00 p.m. on weekends until June 13. From June 18 through Labor Day, it will be open daily. The day passes for residents will be $4.00 for adults, $3.00 for children and seniors, and free for children under three years old. Non-residents will pay $6.00 for adults and $4.00 for children and seniors. Depending on the governor’s COVID orders, there may be limited capacity. If this happens, no season passes will be sold.

When the world shut down last year because of the pandemic, the National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton decided it was time to reach outward.

The question was how, when for a time, people couldn’t even visit the Shrine in Emmitsburg. The answer was simple, profound, and one that Mother Seton, America’s first native-born saint, would have appreciated: Pray.

So, buoyed by dedicated staff members and seminarians from nearby Mount St. Mary’s, the Shrine created a prayer hotline last April that has proven so successful that it plans to continue well after COVID-19 has receded. More than 2,000 calls have been logged, and many of them have turned into relationships that have changed the lives of people on both ends of the line.

“We are sometimes the only ones they talk to; the only ones who say their name,” says Rebecca Corbell, evangelization programs manager at the Shrine. “Having that connection, having a person who knows your name, builds a relationship that is so powerful.”

And this effort isn’t limited to just calls. One of the staff members on this project writes to 12 death row inmates a week. The hotline team also proactively calls people in the Shrine’s vast database to see if they need prayers.

“It’s a way to do pastoral work and to be with people amid the pandemic,” says Christopher Feist, a seminarian from Leonardtown.

The prayer hotline is part of the extensive evangelization efforts of the Shrine, as it marks the 200th anniversary of the death of Mother Seton. In January, the Shrine released Seeker to Saint, a film on her life. Other short films on various aspects of her life and spirituality will be released later this year.

“The Shrine is a basilica, a museum and the real home of a saint, and we have a mission as a place of prayer and pilgrimage to draw people closer to our Lord,” says Rob Judge, executive director of the Shine. “Through programs like the prayer hotline, we connect people to Mother Seton and a life and legacy that is relatable and inspiring. She is a true saint for our times, and we increasingly find that her message resonates with people today.”

The seminarians who attend Mount St. Mary’s Seminary and hail from the Archdiocese of Washington D.C. said they jumped at the chance to participate in the program. “We wanted the experience of being with people and to bring their concerns to God and to show we care and to bring God’s love to them,” Feist said.

The idea of cold-calling people—not to sell them anything but to offer to pray with them—can be intimidating. But in the end, “you’re going to connect with people who Jesus wants you to and nobody else,” said Benedict Radich, from Rockville.

Sometimes the reaction is “are you sure you’re not asking me for money?” said Caleb Gaeng, another seminarian from Bowie. “But it’s beautiful to be with someone who God has put me with; someone who needs prayers at just that moment.”

Prayer requests deal with everything from loneliness and illnesses to issues with jobs, families and addiction, said Karen McGrath of Taneytown and the first person hired on the prayer team. “People need to tell their stories,” she said. “Part of this is just standing with them before God, asking for the things they need.”

She recalls how one man called in January and was distraught. She tried to express how he needed to see how God is with us and in each other.

Recently he called back to say that her advice helped and “that he was able to look at Jesus and say ‘thank you.’”

A prayer ministry comes easy to her, she says. She’s the mother of five sons and a daughter – “so I pray a lot.”

As for the future, the Shrine now sees the hotline – borne in the depths of the pandemic — as an essential part of its mission, Corbell says.

“These are our people,” she says. “We need to be doing this.”

To contact the prayer hotline, call 1-866-202-4934 between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. EDT or visit the prayer request page of the Shrine website.

For more information about the National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, please visit www.setonshrine.org.

Dianne Walbrecker

FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute marked its 70th anniversary in April. The institute, part of the National Emergency Training Center in Emmitsburg, proudly commemorates its long and distinguished history supporting the Nation’s emergency management community.

The Emergency Management Institute began in April 1951 as the Civil Defense Staff College. The Civil Defense staff taught civil defense courses in heavy rescue, program administration and finance, radiation monitoring and control. The early years are highlighted in training films produced by the college’s “School for Survival.” The films depicted trainees fighting incendiary bombs in enclosed spaces, working through poison gas attacks in a sealed chamber, and tunneling through crumbled brick walls. They help illustrate how much emergency management has evolved over the years.

Today, the institute focuses on providing state, local, territorial, and tribal emergency managers with professional leadership and crisis management training, designed to address a wide range of threats and hazards. On an annual basis, the institute offers several hundred instructor-led, virtual and online independent study offerings, training millions of students annually.

To celebrate its 70 years, the Emergency Management Institute will have a year-long celebration to include webinars, podcasts, panel discussions, videos, and featured speakers, providing compelling insights from those who have benefitted over the years from the institute and its predecessor institutions in Olney, Maryland and Battle Creek, Michigan.

written by James Rada, Jr.

4: Feuding

Margaret Rosensteel had been enjoying a magical evening at the town dance in Emmitsburg before everything fell apart. The decorations hung from buildings and strung over the street had been lovely. The weather was warm and pleasant. All the practicing the band had done paid off because they sounded wonderful.

She had danced, which she loved doing, but rarely got to do because her parents thought a future Daughter of Charity should be more serious. And she had met a boy. Not just any boy, either. This one liked her, not because he thought she was cute. He had loved her personality before he ever met her. He had seen her dancing and thought it suited her.

They had danced together, and after that initial uneasiness, they had felt comfortable with each other. She hadn’t restrained her enthusiasm for dancing, which had only made Caleb Sachs smile.

Then, her brothers and Caleb’s friends had gotten into an argument and spoiled the whole evening for her. Caleb had gone to see what was happening with his friends and had gotten swept up in a fight.

Wasn’t that just like boys?

Margaret and her sister Rebecca had left, and Margaret had felt like crying.

Margaret felt no better when she woke up the next morning. She poured water into her basin and washed off, making sure to remove the remains of the makeup she had worn last night. Otherwise, her parents were sure to comment on it. She dressed and went downstairs for breakfast.

Her brothers, Jack and Paul, were sitting at the table talking to her father. What were they doing here? They had their own homes and wives. They all went quiet when she came down. That wasn’t a good sign.

“So did you fight any other children last night?” Margaret said.

“They weren’t children,” Jack said.

“They were my age, and you two are both over twenty. You two looked ridiculous last night.”

“They were spiking the punch,” Paul said.

“Then you should have got their parents and made sure only the adults drank the punch. The last I saw last night was you rolling in cherry pie and yellow cake.”

Jack blushed. Paul colored, too, but he was getting angry.

“I didn’t mean for that to happen, but we didn’t start the fight,” Jack said.

“I was having a wonderful time until you two ruined it.”

“And why were you having such a wonderful time? Was it that boy you were dancing with? It was his friends that caused the problem.”

“From what I saw, Caleb tried to calm things down and you all caught him in the middle. He was acting more like an adult than either of you.”

“Well, your beau is the son of the shopkeeper that is always overcharging us,” Paul said.

Caleb was a shopkeeper’s son. Well, that was a little more she now knew about him.

“If his father overcharges you, then why do you buy from him?” she asked.

“Well, he’s the only one in town who carries some of the things we like.”

“Then how do you know he’s overcharging?”

“Because clothes shouldn’t cost what he charges.”

“I thought you said he sold things other merchants didn’t,” Margaret said. “Everyone sells clothes.”

Paul shook his head. “Sarah likes the fabrics Mrs. Sachs sells. We tried getting them other places, but no one carries them. We’d have to go to Baltimore or Frederick.” Sarah was Paul’s wife.

Samuel Rosensteel stood. “Enough of this arguing. You all are acting like you did when you were in grade school.

“Sorry, Papa,” they all murmured.

“I’ve already spoken to your brothers about their behavior last night, and I’m sure I’ll be hearing plenty more at church tomorrow. What concerns me now is this boy you were dancing with.”

“I danced with three boys, including Caleb,” Margaret said, sounding more defensive than she meant to.

“Apparently only one of them caught your attention enough that both your brothers and Rebecca remarked on it.”

Had her happiness last night been so obvious? What had she been doing that gave away her feelings?

“Let me remind you, Margaret, boys are not for you. Next year, you will become a Daughter of Charity.”

“I know, Papa, but that doesn’t mean I shouldn’t have fun now.”

“It’s what that fun can lead to that I’m concerned about. You need to be preparing yourself for your future.”

“Why must I be reminded about my future all the time? It keeps me from enjoying my life now. I just want to be a girl for a little while longer.”

“You will be when you’re a sister.”

Margaret shook her head. “No, I’ll be a sister, and everyone will treat me differently and expect me to behave in a certain way.”

“You should be proud to be a Daughter of Charity. It’s a sacred calling.”

“But I didn’t get the calling. You did.”

She turned and ran out the back door, ignoring her father calling behind her. She ran until she reached the road, and then she walked toward Emmitsburg.

Her father was sure to scold her when she returned home. She needed to make sure she calmed down before she did, or she might get into an argument with him. She looked around and found herself where she had been dancing yesterday morning…where Caleb had first seen her.

He had watched her dance, and she hadn’t even realized it. She didn’t feel like dancing today. Such a difference in just a day. Even half a day because she had started out last night so happy.

As she crested the hill, she saw Caleb sitting on the ground and staring back into town.

“Caleb,” she said.

He turned his head. He saw her and waved. “I was hoping you might come,” he said.

She walked over and sat down next to him.

“Are you all right?”

He chuckled. “Yes. I just got knocked down. No one hit me. They were aiming at each other.”

“Two of them were my brothers.”

“Two of them were my friends.” He paused. “So, are your brothers angry?”

“Yes.”

He sighed. “My father caught me coming in last night. He wasn’t too happy I went out.”

“Why?”

“I’m Jewish. Friday night starts the Sabbath for us. It would be like you going to a dance on Sunday.”

“Oh, I’m sorry.”

Caleb smiled at her. “It was worth it. I got to meet you.”

Margaret sighed. “Why can’t things be simple?”

“Because we’d never learn if they were, and we would never appreciate the times things were simple.”

“That makes little sense.”

“Sure it does.” He lay on his back. “Here, lay back.”

Margaret copied him. He pointed to the sky.

“What do you see?

“Clouds.”

“I see a horse.” He pointed to one cloud. “And over there, I see a funny face.”

“Oh, you are trying to see shapes in the clouds.”

Caleb nodded. “You dance. I stare at clouds. We both have our ways of relaxing.”

“So, if I cloud-watch with you, will you dance on the hill with me without any music?”

“In a minuet.”

Margaret laughed at the pun and felt some of the tension drain out of her. She pointed at the sky.

“I see the sun.”

“That is the sun.”

Now, it was Caleb’s turn to laugh at her joke. When she lowered her hand, she found Caleb’s and held it lightly.

by James Rada, Jr.

Emmitsburg

Town Gets Partial Grant Funding for Infrastructure Projects

The Town of Emmitsburg received some help with its water and sewer infrastructure projects that will cost more than $5 million.

The water clarifier for the Crystal Fountain Road Water Plant will help treat and improve the raw water quality flowing into the plant. The project costs $1.4 million, but Sen. Hough helped the town get a $1 million grant from the state to pay the majority of costs. The town is responsible for the remaining $400,000. The project is expected to be complete in July 2022.

The Creamery Road Pump Station replacement will cost $3.7 million. The USDA provided the town with an $833,000 grant and $1,987,000 loan, leaving $807,000 for the town to fund. The project is expected to break ground at the end of the year.

The North Seton Avenue and DePaul Street waterline replacement is in the preliminary engineering stage, which will cost the town about $25,000.

Commissioners Make Budget Transfers

Emmitsburg’s Fiscal Year 2020 budget audit confirmed the town had a $180,174 excess in the general fund. In March, the Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners allocated the excess to FY21 general and capital projects. These included projects for stormwater management, town pool, ball fields, the dog park, and COVID-19-related expenses.

Town Recognizes Long-time Employees

The Town of Emmitsburg recently recognized several town employees for their many years of service. The following employees received certificates of appreciation for their service: Dan Fissel, Water/Sewer Superintendent (25 years); Chris Wantz, Public Works (20 years); Amy Naill, Parking/Code Enforcement (15 years); and Steve Fissel, Maintenance (15 years).

The Emmitsburg commissioners also issued a proclamation honoring Keith Suerdieck for his service on various town committees for the past 10 years.

Commission Appointments

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners appointed Glenn Blanchard to the town planning commission for a five-year term and Deborah Hobbs to the ethics commission. The commissioners also reappointed Carolyn and Martin Miller to the parks and recreation committee for two-year terms.

Pavilion Contracts Approved

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners approved the construction of two picnic pavilions in Community Park, one of which will be ADA-compliant. Green Sites in Elkridge won the project with a $40,507 bid that includes steel pavilions and connecting sidewalks. The pavilions are expected to be completed by mid-May. Program Open Space funds will pay for 75 percent of the project, and the town will pay the remaining 25 percent.

M.I. Tech Construction in Frederick won a contract to renovate the Community Park bandstand for $22,270. This project will not only renovate the bandstand, but will add LED lighting to the structure. Program Open Space funds will pay $11,250 of the project, with the town paying the rest.

Thurmont

Town Could Get $5.8 Million from Federal COVID Relief

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners were recently informed that the Town of Thurmont could receive around $5.8 million in federal funds from the $1.9 trillion COVID-relief bill that President Biden signed into law. Mayor John Kinnaird called it “an astounding sum of money” for the town. It can be used to offset the negative economic impact from COVID; pay essential workers premium pay; or cover revenue losses from water, sewer, or broadband infrastructure. The commissioners will be discussing what to do with the funds as the amounts and rules governing their use are made known.

Mowing Contract Approved

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners approved a new two-year contract with Mountain View Lawn Services in Rocky Ridge to mow and maintain 75 acres of town-owned property throughout Thurmont. The contract is for $73,859 each year, with a one-year extension if the commissioners want it. This represents a 2.9 percent increase over the current contract with Mountain View.

Road Paving Project Approved

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners accepted a bid to repave Apples Church Road from East Main Street to the railroad tracks, Mountain Road, and North Altamont Avenue from West Main Street to the railroad tracks. The work includes milling, curb replacements, asphalt resurfacing, striping, and some patching on Gateway Drive West. Pleasant’s Construction of Frederick won the contract with a bid of $190,367.

Stream Cleanup at Community Park

The Thurmont Parks and Recreation Commission is hosting a stream cleanup at Thurmont Community Park on April 10 at 1:00 p.m. Gloves and bags will be provided. Wear a face covering. For more information, contact Amie McDaniels at thurmontparksnrec@gmail.com.

Community Shred Event

The Thurmont Police Department and Woodsboro Bank are sponsoring a community residential shred event at the police station at 800 East Main Street in Thurmont. The event will be held on Apr. 24 from 8 a.m. to noon. You can shred up to five boxes of office paper, paper clips, staples, rubber bands, folders, and labels. Bring a non-perishable food item for each box. The food will go to the Thurmont Food Bank.

Emmitsburg

Mayor Don Briggs

Congratulations to Mount St. Mary’s University and its women’s and men’s basketball teams on winning bids to NCAA tournaments. They came after decisive wins in their respective NEC championship games. The women’s tournament field includes 31 teams and runs from March 21 through April 4. The tournament will be held in San Antonio, Texas. The men’s 67-team field tournaments will be held in Indianapolis, Indiana, from March 18 through April 5. GO MOUNT! Bring it on.

The American Rescue Plan, AKA the Covid Relief Bill, will include funds for the town. Our first priority is creating working opportunities through water and sewer infrastructure projects. In addition to scheduled underground line repair/ replacements, funds will be used for an $800,000 pump station and $400,000 to complement funds from the state for a water clarifier (water treatment filter). 

Vigilant Hose Spring Fling is on. But in a virtual form. If interested, hurry. Contact the fire company for details. Non-Emergency: 301-447-2728. E-mail: info@vhc6.com. The fire company has gone out on several brush fires in March. As a reminder, we need rain.

The Maryland Historical Trust approved another town grant request for downtown façade restoration projects. Going back to 2013, this will be our ninth approval. Approvals are typically for $50,000 in matching funds. For the 2021 cycle, a matching grant of $50,000 is already lined up for disbursement among several private properties. Over the years, the town has received $405,000, resulting in over $1,000,000 in improvements to private properties. If you have an interest in the program for the 2022 grant cycle, please contact Town Planner Zach Gulden at 301-600-6309.

In the Catoctin Cougars football team’s first outing scrimmage with Middletown, the outcome was marred by the serious head injury Cougar lineman Colan Droneburg sustained. From updates, he is up and doing well. The family is overly thankful to the community for the outpouring of support for them and Colan. The Frederick High School game scheduled for March 5 was canceled because Frederick coaches and/or players had failed COVID-protocol testing. As of this writing, games against Thomas Johnson were scheduled for Friday, March 19, at 6:30 p.m., and a close-out game against Brunswick, Friday, March 26, also at 6:30 p.m.  

On the Mayor COVID update video series in February and March, guests included County Executive Jan Gardner, Frederick County Sustainability Department Manager Shannon Moore, and Green Builder Mark Lancaster.

From the County Executive’s Office, over 20 percent of county residents have been vaccinated (mid-March). At that point, total COVID-19 cases for the county were at 12,665 and deaths at 256. In the 21727-zip code, we have had 361 cases. While statewide demand for COVID-related hospital bed demand is declining, Frederick County is still at a second surge level. We are getting there.

With COVID, this Lenten season will be remembered as one where we have given a lot, but do not forget all you do for others, as that also is a part of the season. It has been a special Lent.

From Lib and I, we wish everyone a Happy Eastertide.

Thurmont

 Mayor John Kinnaird

With the arrival of spring, I invite everyone to visit the Thurmont Main Street Farmers Market at their new indoor location! The Farmers Market is open Saturday mornings from 9:00 a.m. until noon at the Thurmont Plaza Shopping Center at 224 North Church Street. Guests are required to wear a face mask and observe social-distancing guidelines. The vendors offer a wide range of produce and baked goods, including cakes, croissants, donuts, cupcakes, cookies, pies, local Red Angus Beef, eggs, handmade cornhole bags, mushrooms, herbs, dried peppers, potted flowers, goat milk soaps, and other goodies. Stop by and check out the selection; you will not be disappointed! After May 1, the Farmers Market will return to the Municipal Parking Lot on South Center Street.

Thurmont residents are encouraged to follow the Planning and Zoning Commission as they work to update the Thurmont Master Plan. This includes reviewing land use, comprehensive rezoning, updates to the Zoning Regulations, improving the Growth Map, and other items. The meetings are open to the public, and there will be public hearings and open houses to get community input. The Thurmont Planning and Zoning Commission meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7:00 p.m.

Thurmont Main Street will be sponsoring Main Street Sweeps on Saturday, June 5, from 9:00-11:00 a.m. Then, Thurmont Green Team, Thurmont Lions Club, YMCA Thurmont Teen Program, and other volunteers will be joining forces to help clean the downtown streets. The cleanup will start on East Main Street, from Thurmont Barber & Styling to the corner at PNC and South Center Street, then onto South Center around to Water Street and back up to the Mechanicstown Square Park. The Thurmont Lions Club will be supplying brooms for the Sweep! Contact Karen Schildt at kschildt@thurmontstaff.com or call her at 240-285-8076 if you would like to help.

I am sure many residents are aware of the issues we have been trying to address at the Recycling drop-off site on Moser Road next to the Regional Library. The recycling facility is located on Town of Thurmont property as a courtesy to Frederick County. The County reimburses the Town for the majority of the cost of dumping the recycling by funding one emptying per week. Any additional emptying is paid for by the Town of Thurmont. In recent months, it seems that almost every weekend people are dropping off recycling when the bin is full. Rather than take the recycling back when there is room in the roll-off, they are throwing it on the ground and making a big mess. The cardboard, paper, and other items blow all over the place, and our staff has to spend several hours on Monday mornings cleaning up the area. What’s worse, is they are dropping off many items that are not recyclable, including styrofoam, trash, construction debris, and plastic bags full of bags of cans-bottles-containers. These items are considered to be contaminants and are refused at the recycling facility. Any load with a noticeable amount of contaminants is refused and sent to the landfill, costing the County additional money. Last week the Town decided to start having the recycling roll-off dumped a second time each week in an effort to reduce the amount of recycling being tossed on the ground. We are funding this and have reached out to the County for financial support for the additional cost involved. We are also posting the property with “No Littering” signs; any items dropped off on the ground at the recycling bin will be considered littering, and those doing so will be fined. It is our hope that the second emptying per week and the No Littering signs will help resolve the situation. The Recycling Drop Off is a valuable asset to the Thurmont Community and the surrounding County residents; we want to do what we can to keep it here for everyone to use.

I hope everyone has a joyful Easter and a pleasant April. As always, I can be reached at jkinnaird@thurmont.com or by phone at 301-606-9458.

It is time to recognize that special teacher who has made an impact on your child’s life and on your school community. Each year, the Thurmont Lions Club honors the teachers of the Catoctin High School and the feeder schools (Thurmont Primary, Thurmont Elementary, Thurmont Middle, Lewistown Elementary, Emmitsburg, Sabillasville, and Mother Seton). Anyone can nominate a teacher—parents, students, fellow teachers, and administrators. 

All nomination forms are due to Lion Gayle DiSalvo no later than Sunday, April 18, 2021. They can be emailed to Rogadodi@aol.com or mailed to Lion Gayle DiSalvo, 142 E. Hammaker Street, Thurmont, MD  21788. Please include “2021 Teacher of the Year” on the subject line if emailing. Forms are available online at www.thurmontlionsclub.com or by contacting Lion Gayle DiSalvo at Rogadodi@aol.com.

The Thurmont Lions Club 2021 Teacher of the Year will be selected from the eight finalists by a committee of community leaders and will be announced at the Thurmont Lions Club’s Education Night meeting on May 12, 2021. If you have any questions, please contact Lion Gayle DiSalvo at Rogadodi@aol.com or 301-271-5355.

Emmitsburg

Mayor Don Briggs

The Green New Deal for Emmitsburg is no big deal. The town government energy needs achieved 95-percent reliance on renewable energy in 2014. It came from solar panels and LED lighting. We even added some possible redundancy along the way with vehicle charging stations, an electric vehicle, and a solar-powered algae control system at Rainbow Lake. We are for renewable energy to save money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Our energy needs for the most part are off the electricity grid. Though the solar panels do create energy on cloudy days, we still need to fall back on using fossil-fuel-generated energy.

Recently, the Eastern Shore Pipeline received unanimous final approval from the Maryland Board of Public Works for an extension of a natural gas pipeline from Delaware, through Wicomico, and 11 miles into Somerset County to the University Eastern Shore and the Eastern Correctional Institute. The pipeline is already in Delaware and Wicomico County. The pipeline is controversial. Natural gas, lest we forget, is a fossil fuel. This is a responsible take by the state to rely on a blend of energy sources. The mix can change over time, but let us do it responsibly.

Ah, the peace a snowfall brings, but not so much for the town crews. Early in the morning hours, late in the night, their skills have been tested. Ever present are the flashing yellow lights on their vehicles. We have approximately a 12-mile network of town roads. So, if they plow both sides of the roads once, they have plowed the same distance as it is to Frederick. And, they do the roads more than once.

In the month of January, the Vigilant Hose Company answered 55 fire calls and 100 ambulance calls. That is over five calls a day! Incredible for a primarily volunteer fire company. That is more than well done. Thank you.

According to Commissioner Davis, Vigilant Hose Company is getting closer to its activities building on Creamery Road being approved by the County Health Department as a vaccination site.

As the town wrestles with the pandemic and weather to get back to a community:

A disc golf tournament was held for the hearty on our course in Community Park on February 21 as a charity event for the Emmitsburg Food Bank.

        In an awkward, but pandemic-adaptive way, the Catoctin Cougars football team will open an abridged spring schedule (four-game season), against Middletown, Friday evening, March 5. The game will be played at Frederick High School on their turf field. Go Cougars! More sports this spring: Please check CHS website and support the teams.

        On Saturday, March 27, the Seton Family Store will host a Spring Fling Craft Fair. Up to 15 crafters and/or vendors, a DJ, and a representative from the Frederick Health Department will be on hand. Emmitsburg area restaurants have been asked to provide a “Taste of Emmitsburg” at the fair. Interested crafts and businesses should call Kenny Droneburg at 301-447-6102.

In January, Keith Suerdieck—after 10 years of dedicated service—stepped down as Chairman of the Emmitsburg Planning Commission. Thank you, Keith; we will miss you. From your architect background knowledge to your experience from being an associate pastor of Trinity Methodist Church, you brought a quiet professional demeanor to the Commission. With Keith stepping down, commission member Mark Long was elected by the board to take his place as chairman. Also, former Town Commissioner Glenn Blanchard came on the Commission as a “new” member. Welcome back, Glenn.

Hope your Lenten season is going well. Stay warm, help a neighbor, be thankful.

Thurmont

 Mayor John Kinnaird

With all the snow we have been getting recently, I will brighten your day by announcing that the Thurmont Main Street Farmers Market will be opening on Saturday, March 20. This is the first indoor version of our popular market, and it will be held in the Thurmont Plaza, 224 North Church Street, from 9:00 a.m. until noon, every Saturday through May 1. Masks are required and social distancing will be observed. After May 1, the market will move to its regular location in the Municipal Parking Lot. The indoor market will feature local honey, sauces, rubs, goat soap, homemade pies, donuts, bread, bagels, gourmet cupcakes, cinnamon rolls, organic greens, a variety of mushrooms, Red Angus beef, Easter flowers, hand-crafted items, and more. This will be a great addition to the already amazing Main Street Farmers Market!

With the return of good weather in April and May, there will be several infrastructure improvements going on in Thurmont. These include repairs to the Frederick Road Bridge over Hunting Creek. This work will be mainly focused under the bridge, repairing some exposed rebar and spalling. There will be water-system repairs on Frederick Road at Emmitsburg Road. This will entail removal of a decommissioned pumping station. We are also planning improvements to Apples Church Road from East Main Street to the railroad tracks. This work will involve milling the surface, repairing curb and gutters, and repaving. We will be sure to notify our residents before any of these projects get underway and keep you updated on their progress.

Residents are encouraged to sign up for a new electronic newsletter, being developed by our Economic Development staff. This newsletter will replace the announcements we send out with the electric billing. The electronic version will allow for more information and updates about local events. There are residents of Thurmont not served by our Electric Company, and this change will ensure that they can receive all our updates and news. If you do not have an email account, there will be printed copies available at the Town Office, Main Street Center, and other locations. Please email your request to receive the Electronic Newsletter to kschildt@thurmontstaff.com.

The Thurmont Planning and Zoning Commission is continuing their updates to the Thurmont Master Plan and Comprehensive Rezoning. I encourage you to watch the P&Z meetings and participate in the public comments and discussion. These meetings are being Zoomed, and log-in information is included with the monthly agenda. The agenda can be viewed online via the Video Streaming page on thurmont.com. This page also contains links to all current and past P&Z and Board of Commissioners meetings.

The Town website also features a new COVID-19 information page, with regularly updated information from Frederick County Health Department and Frederick County Government. Frederick County is receiving COVID-19 vaccines, and they are being made available at several locations in the County. You can get vaccine clinic information at health.frederickcountymd.gov. As vaccines are becoming more available, please do not stop wearing your face masks and observing social distancing.

by James Rada, Jr.

Emmitsburg

No February Meeting

The Emmitsburg Board of Commissioners canceled its monthly meeting because of bad weather. The next meeting will be held on March 1 at 7:30 p.m. You can watch the meeting on Channel 99 or participate via Zoom with a link on the town’s website.

Register for Your COVID-19 Vaccination

Pre-register to get your COVID-19 vaccination. Once you register, you will be contacted when you are eligible for an appointment. Fill out the form at: frederickcountymd.com/covidvaccine.

Thurmont

Frederick Road Bridge Repairs Approved

The Frederick Road Bridge needs work on the concrete substructure to repair cracks, stabilize the piers and gabions, and repair the sidewalks. Three contractors bid on making the needed repairs. The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners approved the low bid of $87,300 from Marine Technologies of Baltimore. The repairs will extend the life of the bridge by 10 to 20 years.

MS4 Engineering Bid Approved

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners approved a bid of $34,500 from ARRO Consulting for engineering and consulting services needed to remain in compliance with Maryland’s mandated MS4 program. Half of the funds will come from the FY2021 budget and the other half will come from the FY2022 town budget.

Water Main Engineering Work Approved

The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners approved a bid from ARRO Consulting for $8,550 for the nonfunctioning North Church Street pumping station engineering and design services. There is a non-functioning waterline under Church Street. The town wants to remove the waterline and replace it with a six-inch water main. The project was approved last year. The design work starts the project. The motion carried 4-0.

written by James Rada, Jr.

A new serial fiction romance story for your enjoyment

2: Anticipation

Margaret Rosensteel washed the dishes from her family’s dinner while she stared out the kitchen window at nothing. The next farm was over half a mile away to the west, and Emmitsburg was a mile or so to the southeast. She couldn’t see lights from either.

She scrubbed the remains of chicken and gravy from the plates and set them aside.

She remembered the young man she had watched drive past St. Joseph’s Church in town. He was her age, but she had never seen him before. Nothing surprising about that. Margaret doubted she knew everyone in town, but it probably meant the teenage boy wasn’t a Catholic. Between Mass and church socials, Margaret did know all the Catholic boys by sight. She even knew a lot of the other boys in town from her school classes. So, why hadn’t she ever noticed that boy before?

What did it matter? Why was she even thinking of him? Nothing could come of it.

Rebecca came downstairs in a blue calico dress Margaret had never seen her wear. She spun around, making the skirt flare.

“How do I look?” Rebecca asked.

“You look wonderful,” Margaret told her.

“I’ve been working on this all day. I saved for the fabric for two months, but could only buy it yesterday. I wanted to show it off tonight.”

“Tonight?”

Rebecca put her hands on her hips. “Yes. Tonight. The spring dance in town. How could you forget?”

Margaret hadn’t so much forgotten as put it out of her mind. She was going to be a Daughter of Charity, and Daughters of Charity didn’t go dancing, at least none she knew.

“Why was it so important to finish it for the dance?” Margaret asked.

“I want the boys to see me in it. Do you think they’ll like me in it?”

Margaret smiled. “Of course, they will. You look beautiful.” Her younger sister was a cute blonde with an outgoing personality. She was already catching the attention of the boys in town.

“You need to get ready now, so we can go,” Rebecca said.

Margaret shook her head. “I’m not going.”

“You have to, Margaret. You skipped the last two dances. I need someone to talk to. It’s no fun without you.”

“You’ll be too busy dancing and talking with the boys. Besides, other girls will be there.”

“Please, come. I won’t have any fun without you.”

That was a lie, but Margaret and Rebecca did have fun together. They were the middle children in the Rosensteel family, only a year apart in age. Jack and Paul were the eldest, and they were married and starting families of their own. David, Sarah, and Michael were all under 12 years old.

The problem was that Margaret would become a sister in another year. She needed to prepare herself for that. No use dancing with boys when there was no possibility of anything more. Her parents had planned her future already, more than they had any of their other children.

Rebecca took her sister by the hand and pulled her upstairs to their bedroom. She opened the armoire that both of them shared and took out Margaret’s Sunday dress and looked at it.

“Too churchy,” the younger girl said, as she tossed it on the bed.

“It’s my best dress.”

“But not one for a dance.”

Rebecca pulled out the second work dress Margaret owned and tossed it on the bed.

“Not that one either,” Rebecca said.

She pulled out the final dress. It was a light blue dress Margaret had made for Elizabeth’s wedding last year. She hadn’t found an occasion to wear it since. Her mother considered it “too casual” for church.

Rebecca shoved the dress into her sister’s arms. “There, now get dressed. You’re going to go with me, and you’re going to have a good time.”

                      ***

Caleb Sachs sat in his room above his father’s store on East Main Street. His parents had the room at the back of the building because it was quieter, but Caleb’s room looked onto the street. He didn’t mind. He could look outside and see what was happening, and tonight, a lot was happening.

People on the sidewalks headed toward the town square, where the spring dance was being held. Everyone would be there celebrating and having fun. Everyone except the Sachs family. It was Friday night, and the Sachs, being Jewish, began celebrating the Sabbath at sundown.

Weekends were never any fun for Caleb. His was the only Jewish family in Emmitsburg, so while his family observed the Sabbath on Friday night and Saturday, he was stuck at home unless his parents went to bed early, and he could sneak off to enjoy time with his friends. Then, on Sunday, when Caleb was free to do something, his friends’ parents were making his friends observe their Sabbath. With nothing to do during the weekend, it felt as long as the week to Caleb.

He walked out of his room to the parlor where his parents sat. His mother played a song he didn’t recognize, but she often composed her own music. His father sat in his armchair reading a book.

“I can hear the band warming up at the square,” Caleb said.

“Mmm-hmmm,” his father said, as he puffed on his pipe.

“I was thinking that since it’s a special occasion, I could go to the dance for a little while.”

His father removed his pipe. “Just make sure to come home at sundown.”

“But Papa, it won’t even be getting going by then. My friends might not even be there. I won’t stay out late. I promise.”

His friends were more likely to arrive early and sneak out early as well, but Caleb wouldn’t tell his father that.

“It’s Friday, Caleb. You know that.”

His mother stopped her playing and turned around on the bench. “We can take the train to Baltimore next week, Caleb. We’ll visit your grandparents.”

“That’s not the same thing, Mama. I wanted to dance.”

She frowned, wrinkling her smooth, pale skin. “With a guy? Why would you want to do that?”

“I like to dance, Mama, and since we’re the only Jewish family in town, if I’m to do that, it would have to be with a Christian girl.”

“If you want to meet a girl, I will have your grandparents find a Jewish girl for you,” his mother said.

Caleb sighed. “Mama, I don’t want to get married. I just want to go to the dance tonight.”

His mother shook her head. “No, better you stay here and not get yourself attached to someone you can’t have.”

Caleb hung his head. His mother just didn’t understand the idea of having fun. For her, it was about finding him a wife since he would soon be 17.

As Caleb walked back to his room, he thought of the one advantage of being the only Jewish family in town, he wasn’t married yet. If there had been an eligible Jewish girl in Emmitsburg or even nearby, his mother would have already paired them up and been planning the wedding.

He looked out his window and saw Peter Wilhide walking down the street. Caleb slid open his window.

“Peter!”

Peter stopped and turned around. He saw Caleb in the window and waved. “Are you coming to the dance, Caleb?”

“My parents won’t let me.”

“Won’t let you? Oh, that’s right, it’s Friday. Then maybe… later?”

Caleb grinned. “Yes, I think so.”

Peter laughed. “I’ll let the others know.”

Caleb shut the window. He glanced at the clock on his wall. The dance would be starting in half an hour. Everyone would be there by 6:30 p.m. He had that long to plan on how he would get past his parents without them knowing.

The Year is…1879

A Pleasant Fall Ride Through Emmitsburg

by James Rada, Jr.

In early October 1879, Samuel Motter, publisher of the Emmitsburg Chronicle, took a ride around Emmitsburg with a friend.

“All the world knows that the drives, calculated to afford pleasure and delight, are very numerous around Emmitsburg, and the heart which is not alive to the beauty of the scenery and the unexampled loveliness everywhere around must be wanting in refined sensibilities,” Motter wrote in the newspaper.

It was a lovely day for a ride. Although it was October, it was 80 degrees out. He wrote, “You who used to sit by glowing stoves, at this time of year, with buttoned-up coats and with sensible forebodings of winter’s approach, think ye of us, riding in an open buggy, with straw hats, and the high temperature we have mentioned!”

They rode down the old “Dutch Lane” to Poplar Ridge Road. The road at the time was old, but it had been widened, leveled, and was kept in excellent condition. His only complaint was that the road had some steep hills. It started at Carlisle Street (North Seton Ave.) continuing from a broad alley. It went uphill to a ridge where the last of a stand of poplar trees stood. This last tree was “lonely and grand in its position, the last of the giant tribe which gave the name ‘Poplar Ridge’ to those heights, and which from its well-defined proportions, its symmetrical top and proud form, being visible over all the plain for miles to the southward, a lady of taste called ‘Stonewall Jackson.’”

Silver Run and the old brick schoolhouse could be seen from the ridge. Looking toward Emmitsburg, the first thing Motter saw was the old Elias Lutheran Church “with its whitened sepulchers glinting in the sun-light, where rest the remains of so much worth and goodness and such wealth of tender associations as cling to the memories of those who once gave direction and life and influence to the living forces of the neighborhood.”

To the right of the church, he saw another church, the Church of the Incarnation (Reformed) “with its golden cross at the top, about 100 feet high erected in the year 1868, on the lot once known as John Nickum’s.”

He also noted how the relatively new Presbyterian Church towered above its surroundings.

Finally, he wrote, “And there to the east and southward is St. Joseph’s Church (Roman Catholic) with its massive walls and solid spire. Here too the cemetery shows forth the white light reflected from the monuments that commemorate, much of the worth which gave active exercise to itself in the earlier as well as the latter history of Emmitsburg.”

As he moved south, he enjoyed the view, writing, “Beautifully the prospect opens, the autumnal hues everywhere meet the eye, here are the sumach shrubs, there a lone gum tree, yonder a clump of trees, farther off a whole grove appears, end erewhile the eyes rests upon the pile of ‘St. Joseph’s House,’ the groves among—ornamenting the plain, and whose metal roofs and radiant crosses dart forth scintillations of light athwart the valley.”

Off to the southwest, he could see Mount St. Mary’s College, although it was almost obscured among the autumn foliage. Motter described it as “the venerable old church perched upon the hillside and sending forth its reflected light to the far distant horizon.”

Motter and his friend crossed the Taneytown Road bridge over Flat Run. He noted that when the bridge was being built, that water level was so flat that not enough water could be drawn to mix mortar for the bridge. It had to be hauled from another location.

He also mentions a haunted house in Emmitsburg. It was the home of a man named Patrick Savage, who may have lived north of town, along the Gettysburg Road. Motter wrote that Savage was dead, but his “ghost had been said to appear there since his death, not seldom.”

All in all, it was a pleasant ride for Motter and his friend, and it gives readers a look at Emmitsburg as it was 141 years ago.

Picture of Emmitsburg Courtesy of Thurmontimages.com

Emmitsburg

Mayor Don Briggs

With the new year comes Emmitsburg onlyinourstate.com recognizing Emmitsburg as one of “The 10 most beautiful, charming small towns in Maryland.” Congratulations! Thank you to former Emmitsburg Mayor Ralph Irlan for bringing this to our attention.

Adding to that good news, the following grants are now in process: FY21 Two Mini Picnic Pavilions in the back of Community Park—$30,750; FY20 Band stand renovation—$11,250; FY20 Memorial Park ball field no. 7 bleacher replacement—$5,250; FY20 Community gardens rehab—$2,550; Disc golf course construction—$14,000; FY21 Wayside Exhibits—$12,052 grant; Engineering study for the waterline replacement project—$25,000.

At the January 2021 regularly scheduled town meeting, commissioners approved four additional wayside exhibits.

The effects of a second surge in coronavirus have hit our zip code. As of January 13, Maryland reported total numbers as follows:

Testing volume: 6,254,353; 24 hr. change +34,334 with 314,867 confirmed cases.

Positive tests: 24 hr. change +2,516.

Deaths: 6,233 deaths, 24 hr. change +37.

In Frederick County, there have been 13,676 positive cases and 207 deaths. In the 21727 zip code, 274 cases. For hospitals, ICU bed demand is up, acute beds demand is up, and total bed demand is up.

From the county executive’s office, first responders and frontline healthcare workers are designated as “Phase 1a” of the vaccine protocol by the state and have begun to receive vaccinations. Adults over 75 years old fall into “Phase 1b,” and the vaccine should be available by late January. For those 65–74 years old in the “Phase 1c” designated bracket, vaccinations are projected to begin in March. We have requested the use of more-convenient facilities than Frederick Health Hospital. We are working on assisting in transportation for those in need of shots wherever they might be administered. We have the vaccine; let’s not let our guard down. Wear a mask, social distance, and wash your hands.

Thank you to all our first responders, hospital staff, and frontliners who serve us every day.

If we are looking for bellwethers as to the progress of our town, all-site approvals for the proposed Rutter’s convenience gas-and-go have finally been accepted by the various levels of government. The expectation is to break ground in early spring. Most notable remaining ones would include grading and seeding along the Flat Run north of the Myers bridge and work along Irishtown Road.

With the recent snow and slow melt, groundwater has been partly replenished, but another slow-melting snow would be wonderful. We need the moisture. Your vigilance in conserving water use is greatly appreciated.

My monthly mantra: Please support our local restaurants and businesses. These are good people who serve us. As a community, through the town, the grants applied, qualified for, and received by the restaurants and businesses pale in comparison to the economic reality of the loss these businesses have experienced. Treat yourselves and help our neighbors: BUY LOCAL – BUY CARRY OUT – DINE OUT and enjoy!

It’s lining up to be a busy spring: vaccines, longer daylight hours, lots of prayers for activities, Groundhog Day, Ash Wednesday (February 17), and Easter (April 4).

Lib and I wish you the best for a happy and healthy 2021. Let us get our shots, wear our mask, wash our hands, and social distance until this virus is just another one of those things out there well under control through vaccines.

Thurmont

 Mayor John Kinnaird

The Thurmont Board of Commissioners (BOC) has opted to return to virtual meetings for the next month. This decision was made based on an increase in positive COVID-19 test results within Frederick County and the 21788 zip code. Residents can watch the meetings on Cable Channel  99, via the streaming video page on the www.thurmont.com website, or by Zoom. The Zoom meeting code is: 671 626 6523; the passcode is: sXxm96. The BOC will reevaluate this decision after the February 9 meeting. 

Free COVID-19 testing continues every other Friday, from 5:00-7:00 p.m. in the parking lot of the Thurmont Town Office at 615 East Main Street. The tests are free and are currently a drive-up test. If you need a COVID-19 test prior to the next one in Thurmont, please go to the Frederick Health Village on Monocacy Boulevard in Frederick. They test seven days a week, from 7:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. Test results typically take four to five days; if you have an upcoming procedure, they will fast-track your test results.

The State of Maryland is about to institute Level 1-B of the COVID Vaccine program. You can sign up for text messages regarding scheduling by texting FredCoVID19 to 888777. More information can be found at https://bit.ly/3bCp1Om. Please be patient; vaccines may be in short supply, and everyone is as anxious as you are to get one.

The Town of Thurmont has been making improvements to the Ice Plant Park and the Woodland Park playgrounds. This includes new climbing pieces, swings, seesaws, and other playground items. This work is being funded through Program Open Space funding and will be completed in the spring. The parks playgrounds are closed temporarily when items are being installed and are open all other times. Our thanks to the Maryland Program Open Space program for helping fund these improvements and to Thurmont’s own Playground Specialists for the amazing equipment and installations.

With winter upon us, I want to remind everyone that when it is calling for snow, we ask that cars be moved off the streets whenever possible. This allows our plows free access to clear the streets to the curb where possible. We also recommend that you do not clear the ends of your driveways until the streets have been cleared. The plows push the snow off the roadways and can reclose driveways. Sidewalks can also be an issue with snow plows. We live on North Church Street, and our sidewalks are regularly pushed shut by the SHA snow plows. It is helpful to wait until the streets are plowed before clearing sidewalks, where there’s no place to throw the snow or where there is no separation from the roadway. This is especially something to consider if you live on one of our State Highways, including East and West Main Street and North Church Street. Please be careful driving in icy or snow conditions.

The Thurmont Planning and Zoning Commission continues to address the Master Plan update and will be holding hearings to address this update throughout the next several months. P&Z meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 7:00 p.m. and can schedule special meetings. At this time, meetings are closed to in-person attendance, but residents can watch online or on Channel 99 and contact P&Z with questions or comments. Planning and Zoning Agendas are posted on www.thurmont.com on the Video Streaming page.

I hope everyone has a great month! As always, I can be contacted by phone at 301-606-9458 and via email at jkinnaird@thurmont.com.

by James Rada, Jr.

Emmitsburg

Trying to Make Vaccine Convenient

As Frederick County rolls out its vaccination program, town staff is trying to get a vaccination location in the northern end of the county. Currently, the closest place to receive a COVID-19 vaccine is in Frederick. Since many of the people receiving the early vaccinations are elderly, traveling to Frederick could be a problem. If a north-county vaccination location can’t be arranged, staff is also looking into the possibility of arranging special transportation for residents to take them to Frederick for their vaccinations.

Town Approves Four More Waysides

The Emmitsburg Commissioners approved four more waysides at historical sites in town, as the town works toward creating a historical walking tour through the town. The new waysides are:

John Armstrong and the American Long Rifle on East Main Street.

The Emmitsburg Railroad on South Seton Avenue.

Volunteers Mural on South Seton Avenue (the Frederick County Fire Museum will pay half the cost).

St. Joseph’s House on South Seton Avenue (Daughters of Charity will pay half the cost).

The cost for the new waysides is $12,054 and will be paid for with a grant from the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority.

New Town Parks Requirements Approved

The Emmitsburg Commissioners held a public hearing about proposed changes to the town’s subdivision amendment concerning parks. The amendment requires 10 acres of park/open space land for every 1,000 in a subdivision or $1,200 in-lieu-of land per dwelling unit.

Waterline Replacement Contract Approved

The Emmitsburg Commissioners approved a contract to have McCrone Engineering complete a preliminary engineering report and environmental report on the town’s water system. This is required before the town can seek funding to replace the water lines on DePaul Street and North Seton Avenue.

Considering Little League Donation

The Thurmont Little League is trying to raise $20,000 to send 17 players and coaches to Cooperstown, New York, to play in a special tournament at the home of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Since some of the players are from Emmitsburg, the Emmitsburg Commissioners are planning on making at least a $1,000 donation. This amount could increase based on how much money can be found in the budget and how much other local governments will contribute.

Board of Appeals Appointment

The Emmitsburg Commissioners appointed Dr. Levi Esses as an alternate member of the Board of Appeals, with his term ending on January 11, 2024.

Thurmont

Thurmont Goes All Virtual

On January 19, 2021, Thurmont town meetings went all virtual with no in-person attendance. The Thurmont Mayor and Commissioners did this based on the rise of the number of COVID cases in the county. Meetings will remain this way until February 9, when the situation will be re-evaluated. Residents can participate in the virtual meetings via Zoom. (Meeting code: 671 626 6523, Passcode: sXxm96). You can also call into the meeting at 301-715-8592. Meetings will also continue to be televised on Comcast channel 99 and at www.thurmont.com.

Town Hiring Lateral Police Officers

The Thurmont Police Department is hiring lateral police officers. These are police officers who are already Maryland certified. Applications can be picked up at the Police Department (800 E. Main Street) or found online at www.thurmont.com.

Town Considers Annexation

The Town of Emmitsburg is considering annexing the Simmers property at 304 Apples Church Road. The property is zoned agricultural and is already partially within the town. The property owners would like to have it zoned R-5 residential if it is annexed. The proposed plan includes 6 duplex units, 52 townhomes, 88 apartments, and a senior living area with 40 independent and assisted-living units and 20 memory care units. The commissioners accepted the proposal. It will now go to the planning and zoning commission for a recommendation.

Commissioner Liaisons Remain Unchanged

Thurmont Mayor John Kinnaird asked the town commissioners if they wanted to make changes to the liaison assignments for 2021. None did, so the liaisons remain:

•   Marty Burns—Planning and Zoning Commission, Internet Commission

•   Bill Buehrer—Police Commission, Parks and Recreation Commission

•   Wayne Hooper—Senior Center Liaison, Planning and Zoning Commission backup, Internet Commission backup

•   Wes Hamrick—Main Street Liaison, Thurmont Addictions Commission

Emmitsburg

Mayor Don Briggs

Town Christmas decorations are up, and the town’s main streets stand dually adorned. To the broad sweep of the engineered virus a faint tribute, a mere tip of the hat, to all the traditional events we have forgone this past year. The pandemic, with certainty, jarred our routines. We have rubbed two sticks together to make another wonderful year here in Northern Frederick County. We have had to adjust to less, but less has come to be better in many respects. In part because of who we are and the way we live. To the overwhelming generosity of everyone living in our valley. Thank you. It has been the glue.

Somewhere amidst the strands of news coverage over the last weeks was the mention of a C.S. Lewis essay he wrote in 1948, regarding going on with life with the threat of the atomic bomb. Googling to find the essay, I saw where someone had the presence of mind, and connection to the breadth of Lewis’ writings, to suggest replacing “COVID-19 pandemic” in place of “atomic bomb.” Below is the Lewis essay. A year to remember, our stint in history.

“In one way we think a great deal too much of the atomic bomb. ‘How are we to live in an atomic age?’ I am tempted to reply: ‘Why, as you would have lived in the sixteenth century when the plague visited London almost every year, or as you would have lived in a Viking age when raiders from Scandinavia might land and cut your throat any night; or indeed, as you are already living in an age of cancer, an age of syphilis, an age of paralysis, an age of air raids, an age of railway accidents, an age of motor accidents.’

“In other words, do not let us begin by exaggerating the novelty of our situation. Believe me, dear sir or madam, you and all whom you love were already sentenced to death before the atomic bomb was invented: and quite a high percentage of us were going to die in unpleasant ways. We had, indeed, one very great advantage over our ancestors—anesthetics; but we have that still. It is perfectly ridiculous to go about whimpering and drawing long faces because the scientists have added one more chance of painful and premature death to a world which already bristled with such chances and in which death itself was not a chance at all, but a certainty.

“This is the first point to be made: and the first action to be taken is to pull ourselves together. If we are all going to be destroyed by an atomic bomb, let that bomb when it comes find us doing sensible and human things—praying, working, teaching, reading, listening to music, bathing the children, playing tennis, chatting to our friends over a pint and a game of darts—not huddled together like frightened sheep and thinking about bombs. They may break our bodies (a microbe can do that) but they need not dominate our minds.”

“On Living in an Atomic

    Age” (1948) in Present

   Concerns: Journalistic Essays.

Safe outdoor exercising is a strong ally of social distancing. Wear your face mask. Enjoy our parks and connected town.

From Libby and I: We hope you had a Merry Christmas, and we wish you a Happy New Year. 2020 is behind us; now, by the grace of God, we are armed with several vaccines. Let us go on with our lives, our stockings full.

Thurmont

 Mayor John Kinnaird

The year 2020 is now behind us, and I look forward to a much improved 2021. I hope everyone had a Merry Christmas. I wish you a very Happy New Year and a healthy and happy year ahead.

The COVID-19 vaccine is being distributed and should be broadly available to all of us in the coming months. With that in mind, I ask that all of us keep doing what we can to help stem the spread of this virus. Wash your hands regularly, wear a mask when out in public and when in contact with others, keep at least six feet away from others whenever possible, and try not to gather in large groups. COVID-19 will continue to be a high health concern until the majority of our residents have been vaccinated.

As I first noted, I am looking forward to the year 2021 being a better year than 2020. It is my hope that all our friends and family stay safe, and that we move forward into the new year with an open mind and with an optimistic spirit.

Please call me at 301-606-9458 or email me atjkinnaird@thurmont.com with any questions or concerns you may have.

James Rada, Jr.

Emmitsburg’s annual Evening of Christmas Spirit had little spirit this year because of COVID-19.

About a dozen people were on hand for the lighting of the town Christmas tree in front of the Emmitsburg Community Center on the evening of December 7, 2020. Christmas music played during the brief event that usually draws a crowd and has local students singing carols.

Mayor Don Briggs thanked the small group for coming out. He acknowledged the problems that COVID has caused this year, and said, “Sometimes you’ve got to go with what you can.”

Briggs asked Dacosta Wivell, 12 years old, and the only child at the event, to assist him with the countdown. Then the pair flipped the switch, and the lights came on.

In the past, “An Evening of Christmas Spirit” at the Carriage House Inn has followed the tree-lighting ceremony. The event typically draws hundreds of people both inside and outside of the restaurant who come to enjoy free food, music, crafts, hayrides, and Santa’s visit.

None of that happened in December. For the first time in 32 years, it was canceled. State restrictions on restaurants and gatherings because of the virus forced the closure.

Mayor Don Briggs and Dacosta Wivell congratulate each other after lighting the town’s Christmas tree.

Photo by James Rada, Jr.