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The CYA Basketball 2nd Annual Shoot-A-Thon event was held on Sunday, February 10, 2019, at Catoctin High School. It was a great success. Committee members planned an action-packed, fun-filled day for all the players that participated. The Shoot-A-Thon featured concessions, music, a face painter, and a bunch of high-fives and hugs. There were plenty of smiles, great shots, entertaining games, and community bonding that conveyed the spirit of our Cougar family.  

CYA is pleased to announce the raising of $9,600 from the event. In addition, over 500 non-perishable canned foods were collected that were donated to the Thurmont and Emmitsburg Food Banks.

Prizes were awarded for highest percentage foul shots made in seven groups, as well as the highest fundraiser. Winners were recognized at the Lady Cougars last home game of the season on February 15. Congratulations to all the winners: Austin Van Echo, Raegan Smith, Ethan Tokar, Corine Jewell, Kourtney Bell, Parker Davis, Colton Gray, Cooper Wiles, Dalton Reed, Abbey Shaffer, Melanie Topper, Drew Nicholson, Derek Nicholson, Jacob Kiltsch, Kaydense Cox, Eli Yocum, Emily Wetzel, Kamryn Goodin, Ava Ganjon, Paige Sweeney, and Brayden Grable. Winners of the canned food raffle include Olivia Morroni, Eli Yocum, Logan Berg, and Chase Cregger.

Student volunteers with the canned goods collected during the CYA Basketball 2nd Annual Shoot-A-Thon.

Deb Abraham Spalding

Locally, we’re at war. We’re not in an obvious battle, it’s a hushed one. Our casualties are many. Our enemy is addiction. Through the efforts of the Thurmont Addiction Commission (TAC), and several other groups and individuals, we’re starting to fight back in the Catoctin area.

Chris Schildt of Thurmont wasn’t our area’s first casualty of addiction, but his death was one that inspired collective action to do something to help and prevent addiction. In his case, a street drug addiction began after using prescribed drugs for a sports injury. Chris had a bright future ahead of him. He was an athlete, a 2009 graduate of Catoctin High School, a 2015 graduate of Shepherd University, he had a job, he coached youth sports, and he had recently become a father, when he died in June 2016 from an overdose, or bad batch, of heroin.

Chris didn’t want to die, but addiction has no geographic, demographic, moral, financial, age, or racial boundaries. We honor him, all who have passed, and all who battle addiction, by seeking solutions and resources in the Catoctin Community. It’s time that we all become proactive in attack to defeat this enemy from which no one is safe, because even if we don’t have an addiction ourselves, we may have a family member, friend, or neighbor who does.

Addiction is a disease that is believed to be caused by a genetic predisposition that can react to stimulants and immediately cause addiction. The reference to addiction in this article is not only on drugs since addiction comes in many forms, with drugs, smoking, drinking, and eating being the most obvious, and sex, tanning, pulling out your hair, and social media being examples of the less obvious.

Chris’ death was the spark of intention for his father and mother, Ed and Karen Schildt of Thurmont, who joined in the efforts of others who had already started fighting, healing, and helping to deal with this enemy they never saw coming. The Schildts’ path to recovery in mourning was to do something, anything.

Ed said, “We were supported tremendously when our son passed. We stood in a receiving line at Stauffer Funeral Home for ten straight hours with Chris’ death. We were supported during the days and weeks and months afterward. When clarity came back, we said, ‘What can we do? How do we say thank you?’ The Schildts held an educational awareness event in April of 2017, called “Introduction to the Enemy,” during which the auditorium at Catoctin High School was filled.

Ed explained, “The ‘Introduction to the Enemy’ event puts addiction in the room with you as the monster that it is, and then it shows you the struggles. In the end, you’re supporting those who are dealing with a disease. It’s not a problem. It’s a disease.” He added, “This is a topic

[addiction]

that doesn’t normally draw a crowd. It made people more aware. From that, the community said, ‘What’s next?’”

The result of that first event was a challenge for Ed and Karen to continue to step up. Former Mayor and current Thurmont Town Commissioner Marty Burns attended that first event and told Ed that his opinion of addiction had changed because of it. From that point, Marty involved the Town of Thurmont and there were follow-up meetings and then the opportunity to create the Thurmont Addiction Commission (TAC).

TAC stands upon three pillars: Educational Awareness (Ed Schildt, Pillar Lead), Support and Recovery (Myra Derbyshire, Pillar Lead), and Prevention and Outreach (Susan Crone, Pillar Lead).

Educational Awareness is the broadest pillar and encompasses everything; Support and Recovery is a positive thing because it’s all about supporting people in recovery or seeking recovery; and Prevention and Outreach, that’s where Susan Crone’s FUSE Teen Center comes in; young people are shown alternatives to prevent addiction and provide positive options and results.

TAC is a growing group of advocates, who are providing information and resources to the community and empowering those who are doing good things in this battle right now.

The FUSE Teen Center is one example of a program TAC is empowering. Susan Crone is the founder of FUSE, a teen center where participants are encouraged to interact with each other without technology. This program has been running for a while now, and participants are truly having a blast.

Susan is a tenured teacher at Thurmont Elementary School, who stepped up to do something about the addiction and suicide frequency she was noticing. She is joined by many volunteers to operate FUSE, and they’re currently meeting at the Trinity United Church of Christ on East Main Street in Thurmont. It is a social option for teens from sixth to twelfth grade, from 4:00-6:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and Fridays from 6:00-9:00 p.m. Teens may come to just hang out with each other, play games, and be creative, or they can bring homework and FUSE volunteers will do their best to lend a hand. They are always looking for ideas and volunteers.

“FUSE is a place where teens have the undivided attention of volunteers who are there because they care about the future for them. We will do whatever we can to help them find the treasures that are already inside them waiting to be found,” said Susan.

To learn more, check out FUSE Teen Center on Facebook.

Chastity Fox, founder of the Music is Medicine Foundation nonprofit, is an advocate for addiction recovery after losing her brother, Richard “RJ” Holmes, to a heroin overdose in October 2016. She is close to opening The Path—Peer Recovery Community Center, which will offer free peer-to-peer addiction support with certified Peer Recovery Specialists. This is another project that TAC is empowering.

Other services at PATH include music therapy, yoga, meditation, classes for the community, family support groups, job-seeking skills, resume writing, and other resources that help a person with addiction become a functioning member of society.

This resource center is located at 31B Water Street in Thurmont. TAC is supporting it and assisting with the operation. There is an immediate need for volunteers, especially a person to write a business plan and a grant writer. Other needs are for donations of furniture and things like a television. Like the Music is Medicine Foundation on Facebook or call Chastity at 240-440-2020 or e-mail RJsLastingStrengthFoundation@gmail.com.

There’s so much that is being mixed in marijuana, cocaine, and heroin that’s not known. These aren’t pharmacists out there. They’re street dealers. They’re getting the cheapest ingredients to make the most profit, and they’re preying on people with addiction.

To become a warrior in our community’s battle against addiction, visit the Thurmont Addiction Commission on Facebook or seek out any of the resources in this article.

Theresa Dardanell

See someone alone. Reach out and help. Start With Hello! In September, Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS) participated in the third annual Sandy Hook Promise Start With Hello Week. This national anti-violence campaign encourages students to reduce social isolation with acts of kindness that starts with just saying hello. Schools created activities to promote a welcoming and inclusive place for all students.

Catoctin High School

Catoctin High School (CHS) students started the week by decorating outside the cafeteria with slogans to promote the Sandy Hook Promise Campaign. On “Hey Day Thursday,” students and staff were given name tags and the challenge was to greet new people. Representatives from the Mental Health Association distributed information, and students were given the opportunity to sign up for the Out of the Darkness Walk. A team will represent CHS during this walk at Baker Park. On “Green Out Friday,” students and staff wore green in support of the campaign, and a group picture was taken of students spelling out “Hello” on the baseball field. School Social Worker Debbie Wivell said, “It was wonderful to see many students and staff participate in the Hey Day. This early in the year, teachers and students are still getting to know each other and this is important. Green Out day was also a success.”

Thurmont Middle School

Students at Thurmont Middle School (TMS) had lots of opportunities to connect with each other. On “Hey Day Monday,” they started by saying hello to new people. The challenge on Tuesday was to make sure no one sat alone at lunch. TMS student Charlotte Bradley said, “I really liked the lunch activity of not sitting alone, where we sat with students based on our interests. The lunch activity seemed to really encourage inclusiveness and connectedness with students that we don’t normally talk to.” School Counselors Becky Krauss and Sherry Bueso agreed that Wednesday’s activity was also very successful. They said, “We are thinking that the positive post-it-notes were the most successful because most of our students participated in their classes. Students left positive, encouraging messages on their desks to be received by the next student sitting there.” The challenge on Friday was to perform a random act of kindness for a teacher or student. Principal Daniel Enck said, “The various activities that our students, staff, and community members participated in throughout the week helped bring our school community closer together. Additionally, the activities allowed students to see the benefits of reaching out to other students who they may not typically interact with. I can’t thank our students, staff, and community members enough for all of their efforts in making Start with Hello week such a success.”

Thurmont Elementary School

Students at Thurmont Elementary School especially enjoyed having community members greet them in the mornings during the week.  Special guests included directors from the FCPS central office; Mayor John Kinnaird; Keyote, the Frederick Keys mascot; athletes and cheerleaders from Catoctin High School; members of the Thurmont Police Department; Boy Scout Leaders; and employees of the local Kountry Kitchen restaurant. Activities during the week were geared toward making all students feel welcome. They had daily ice breakers during lunch and courtesy lessons on how to introduce yourself to a new person. Darby Carson said, “It helps people and makes them feel like they matter. I think we should keep doing it and let that legacy live on.” Claire Daly said, “It is helpful for those kids who don’t have a lot of friends. They won’t be so lonely.” Tyler McCallion said, “Once you get to know people more, you realize you could be really good friends.” Shalina Weitzel said, “Start With Hello Week makes us feel inspired to help other kids.” School Counselor Tammy Brotman said, “I think this is a really important message to give our students.  Having Start with Hello Week gives students both the opportunity but most of all the courage to try reaching out to others.  We are trying to build a culture of kindness, and this is a great way to continue to support that goal and really make it a genuine part of what we’re about at TES.”

Sabillasville Elementary School

Sabillasville Elementary School (SES) students started the week with one important word: Hello. On Tuesday, they wore clothing that displayed something about themselves so that they could learn about each other. School Counselor Niki Kayser said, “The students and staff really enjoyed sharing why they chose the shirt they did. It encouraged them to learn a little more about their peers’ interests.” Students performed random acts of kindness on Wednesday and participated in special activities on Thursday and Friday.  Kayser said that she received positive feedback from staff and students and heard the comment, “It’s important to be kind all the time!” many times during the week. She also said, “I feel this message is wonderful! It’s a simple way to help create a more connected and inclusive school community. This message reminds us to encourage and support one another on a daily basis, and to understand how important it is to help students learn how to be accepting of others and to see that all it takes to make a difference is just a few simple words.”

Emmitsburg Elementary School

Emmitsburg Elementary School (EES) will be incorporating the idea of friendship throughout the school year to support the Leader In Me Positive Behavior Intervention System. Activities for the week included wearing green on Monday, signing a school banner on Tuesday, breakfast buddies on Wednesday, sharing stickers on Thursday, and making posters on Friendship Friday. School Counselor Sarah Fawley said, “The students really enjoyed working with other students in making their posters. They enjoyed the morning greeters in the front lobby, who greeted students with ‘hello’ and passed out stickers and pencils.” She said that students were more aware of others; they invited other students to sit with them at lunch.

Fawley also said, “This message is very important. There is so much power in five little letters (Hello) that can impact someone’s day or life forever.”

Starting the Day by saying “Hello” at Thurmont Elementary School: Dr. Keith Harris, FCPS executive director of Accelerating Achievement & Equity; Debra O’Donnell, TES principal; students, Adania Kreitz, Darby Carson, Carolyn Mercer, Claire Daly, Tyler McCallion, Chase Jackson, Summer Bostic, Tristan Lease, Shalini Weitzel, Warren Schafer; and Thurmont Mayor John Kinnaird.

Photo by Theresa Dardanell

Austin Fogle has earned the highest rank in Boy Scouts of America: Eagle Scout. Austin’s Eagle Scout project was to rebuild the outdoor chapel at Camp West-Mar, located off Route 77 near Foxville. With the help of Troop 1011 scouts and adult volunteers, the old walls were removed and new walls were built. Over a couple of weekends, the project took 460 volunteer hours to complete. Austin was inspired to take on this extensive project after a camping trip there, when he noticed caution tape affixed to trees keeping people from entering the chapel area. Having experienced his first scout camping trip at Camp West-Mar, this location held special meaning to him.

Austin has demonstrated leadership in a variety of roles, having served three terms as Senior Patrol Leader of Troop 1011; Vice Chapter Chief of the Order of the Arrow; Assistant Senior Patrol Leader of Jamboree Troop 1440; and Wilderness Pledge Guia at Philmont Scout Ranch in Cimarron, New Mexico.

Austin is a senior at Catoctin High School, where he has maintained perfect attendance and belongs to the National Honor Society, Frederick County Career and Technology Center Technical Honor Society, and is a Skills USA local competition winner in Carpentry. Austin is also a member of the Frederick Church of the Brethren, where he serves as greeter and usher.

The project wouldn’t have been possible without the generous donations made by Frederick Brick Works, Robert W. Sheckles Inc., York Building Products, Barrick and Sons, and Federal Stone Industries Inc.

Tristan Rice, of Sabillasville, is a sixteen-year-old junior at Catoctin High School and an HVACR/Plumbing student at the Frederick County Career and Technology Center. This busy student is also a dedicated athlete who throws the shot put during the school year for the Track and Field Team at Catoctin, and works out several times a week at Anytime Fitness in Thurmont, honing his powerlifting skills and increasing his strength.

Tristan recently set two national powerlifting records and an unofficial world record. His national records include a 502.6 lb. squat and a 510.4 lb. deadlift recorded in the USPA 16-17 Year Old 275 LB Weight Class and his world record was in the IPL 15-19 Year Old 275 LB Weight Class. The Records were set August 18, 2018, at CrossFit Frederick during the Maryland Drug Tested State Championship meet.

Tristan is traveling to Las Vegas for the IPF Drug Tested World Championship where he will officially compete for two world records in the squat and deadlift.

Tristan explained that, “Powerlifting is something that I’ve done in football and shot put and I decided to pursue this summer while working as a full-time plumber.”

“After seeing what the records were, I decided to start powerlifting and see what limits I could push myself to. I work very hard in this and want to go to the world championship and do my very best.”

Tristan’s parents, Penny and Russell Rice are very proud of him. They indicated that this is something Tristan has done on his own and he is very passionate about it. “It was great watching him train for this and watching his numbers climb week by week,” Penny said, “Sometimes he’d go to the gym at 11 o’clock at night just to get his workout in.”

The 62nd Annual Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show will be held at Catoctin High School, located at 14745 Sabillasville Road in Thurmont, on September 7-9, 2018.  All events, activities, and entertainment are free.

Free entry of exhibits will take place on Thursday evening, September 6, from 6:00-9:00 p.m., and on Friday, September 7, from 8:30-11:30 a.m., in the new gymnasium and in the Ag Center. Judging will begin at 12:30 p.m. Commercial exhibits may be entered on Friday, September 7, from 3:30-5:30 p.m. The show will open to the public at 6:00 p.m.

On Friday night, September 7, the opening ceremonies will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the auditorium, where the 2018-2019 Catoctin FFA Chapter Ambassador will be announced. In addition, this year’s program will feature the 42nd Annual Community Flag Ceremony and honor Catoctin High School’s 50th anniversary. At 8:15 p.m., the annual Baked Goods Auction will begin immediately following the program, with the Grand Champion Cake, Pie, and Bread sold at 9:00 p.m. Buyers are welcome to purchase baked good items to support the Community Show and many local organizations.

On Saturday, September 8, the Community Show is open from 9:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.  Activities include a Market Goat, Beef, Sheep and Swine Fitting & Showing Contest in the Ag Center, from 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. In the front lawn of the school at 10:00 a.m., there will be a Pet Care Seminar by Dr. Jonathan Bramson of the Catoctin Veterinary Clinic, immediately followed by the Pet Show at 10:30 a.m. A petting zoo, farm animals, and pony rides will also be held on Saturday and Sunday in the upper parking lot area, from 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

The Thurmont Academy of Self Defense will present a martial arts program in the small gymnasium at 1:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, September 8, and the Elower-Sicilia Productions Dance Program will have a 3:00 p.m. program in the auditorium.

The Thurmont Grange will serve its turkey and country ham supper in the school cafeteria, from 3:00-7:00 p.m. on Saturday night, September 8. Prices are: $13.00 for adults and $7.00 for ages under twelve. Carryouts are $14.00. In the auditorium at 4:30 p.m., an Open Mic Showcase of Talent by local teen performers will be held. At 6:00 p.m., the Catoctin Mountain Boys will feature musical entertainment. At 7:00 p.m., the Taylor Brown’s Elvis Tribute Show will be held.

On Saturday night, the 44th Annual Catoctin FFA Alumni Beef, Sheep & Swine Sale will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Ag Center, selling approximately 8 goats, 22 swine, 10 sheep, and 9 beef steers. Buyers are welcome and encouraged to attend.

On Sunday, September 9, activities begin at 9:00 a.m. with the Dairy Goat Show, followed by the Dairy Cattle Show.

At noon on Sunday, the Catoctin FFA Alumni Chicken Bar-B-Que will be held in the cafeteria. Prices are: $10.00 for adults and $7.00 for ages under twelve. Carryouts are $11.00. A Kiddie Pedal Tractor Pull will be held at 12:30 p.m. in the Ag Center area.

In the auditorium, the Catoctin Mountain Boys will feature musical entertainment at 12:30 p.m., and the Taylor Brown’s Elvis Tribute Show will be held at 1:30 p.m. The 35th Annual Catoctin Mountain Log Sawing Contest will be held at 1:00 p.m. in the Ag Center, with classes for adults and children. The 39th Annual Robert Kaas Horseshoe Pitching Contest will begin at 1:00 p.m. on the softball field behind the school.

Exhibits must be removed on Sunday, September 9, from 3:00-6:00 p.m. Any exhibits not removed may be picked up from the school’s Agriculture Center on Tuesday, September 11, from 9:00 a.m.-noon.

By early August, the Community Show booklets can be found in local Thurmont and Emmitsburg area businesses. New residents of the community are urged to enter exhibits—and it is free to enter—and be a part of the Community Show, the largest in the State of Maryland. Please note rule and class changes to Dept. 12’s Arts, Painting & Drawing and Dept. 13’s Arts & Crafts Departments, as well as minor changes to several departments this year. Departments include: Fresh Fruits, Fresh Vegetables, Home Products Display, Canned Fruits, Canned Vegetables, Jellies & Preserves, Pickles, Meats, Baked Products, Sewing & Needlework, Flowers & Plants, Arts, Paintings & Drawings, Crafts, Photography, Corn, Small Grains and Seeds, Eggs, Nuts, Poultry & Livestock, Dairy, Goats, Hay, Junior Department and Youth Department.

Please visit the Community Show’s website for the entry exhibit list, schedule of events, and more information at: www.thurmontemmitsburgcommunityshow.webs.com.

The Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show is sponsored by the Thurmont Grange, Catoctin FFA Chapter, Catoctin FFA Alumni, Maryland State Grange, and the Maryland State Agricultural Fair Board.

Competition was tough and exciting during the Kiddie Tractor Pull at the 2017 Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show, just one of the many fun contests offered during this much-anticipated yearly event.

Catoctin High School will host various activities all school year to commemorate the school’s 50th anniversary. Anniversary activities are planned for Catoctin’s Homecoming on October 5, 2018. Before the homecoming football game, an anniversary parade will be held; a reception will be held in the cafeteria at the high school before the game. During the reception, alumni can snack, socialize, and tour the school. Committee members are looking for memorabilia from the last fifty years that can be photographed, scanned, and/or displayed in the school for the 2018-2019 school year. In addition, families where multiple generations have graduated from CHS, please visit www.sites.google.com/fcps.org/catoctin50 to find out how to contribute to this celebration this school year!

The CHS Student Government Association and CHS Sports Boosters will host activities to commemorate the anniversary throughout the year. Stay tuned for details.

The 62nd Annual Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show will be held at Catoctin High School, located at 14745 Sabillasville Road in Thurmont, on September 7-9, 2018.  All events, activities, and entertainment are free.

Free entry of exhibits will take place on Thursday evening, September 6, from 6:00-9:00 p.m., and on Friday, September 7, from 8:30-11:30 a.m., in the new gymnasium and in the Ag Center. Judging will begin at 12:30 p.m. Commercial exhibits may be entered on Friday, September 7, from 3:30-5:30 p.m. The show will open to the public at 6:00 p.m.

On Friday night, September 7, the opening ceremonies will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the auditorium, where the 2018-2019 Catoctin FFA Chapter Ambassador will be announced. In addition, this year’s program will feature the 42nd Annual Community Flag Ceremony and honor Catoctin High School’s 50th anniversary. At 8:15 p.m., the annual Baked Goods Auction will begin immediately following the program, with the Grand Champion Cake, Pie, and Bread sold at 9:00 p.m. Buyers are welcome to purchase baked good items to support the Community Show and many local organizations.

On Saturday, September 8, the Community Show is open from 9:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.  Activities include a Market Goat, Beef, Sheep and Swine Fitting & Showing Contest in the Ag Center, from 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. In the front lawn of the school at 10:00 a.m., there will be a Pet Care Seminar by Dr. Jonathan Bramson of the Catoctin Veterinary Clinic, immediately followed by the Pet Show at 10:30 a.m. A petting zoo, farm animals, and pony rides will also be held on Saturday and Sunday in the upper parking lot area, from 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

The Thurmont Academy of Self Defense will present a martial arts program in the small gymnasium at 1:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, September 8, and the Elower-Sicilia Productions Dance Program will have a 3:00 p.m. program in the auditorium.

The Thurmont Grange will serve its turkey and country ham supper in the school cafeteria, from 3:00-7:00 p.m. on Saturday night, September 8. Prices are: $13.00 for adults and $7.00 for ages under twelve. Carryouts are $14.00. In the auditorium at 4:30 p.m., an Open Mic Showcase of Talent by local teen performers will be held. At 6:00 p.m., the Catoctin Mountain Boys will feature musical entertainment. At 7:00 p.m., the Taylor Brown’s Elvis Tribute Show will be held.

On Saturday night, the 44th Annual Catoctin FFA Alumni Beef, Sheep & Swine Sale will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Ag Center, selling approximately 8 goats, 22 swine, 10 sheep, and 9 beef steers. Buyers are welcome and encouraged to attend.

On Sunday, September 9, activities begin at 9:00 a.m. with the Dairy Goat Show, followed by the Dairy Cattle Show.

At noon on Sunday, the Catoctin FFA Alumni Chicken Bar-B-Que will be held in the cafeteria. Prices are: $10.00 for adults and $7.00 for ages under twelve. Carryouts are $11.00. A Kiddie Pedal Tractor Pull will be held at 12:30 p.m. in the Ag Center area.

In the auditorium, the Catoctin Mountain Boys will feature musical entertainment at 12:30 p.m., and the Taylor Brown’s Elvis Tribute Show will be held at 1:30 p.m. The 35th Annual Catoctin Mountain Log Sawing Contest will be held at 1:00 p.m. in the Ag Center, with classes for adults and children. The 39th Annual Robert Kaas Horseshoe Pitching Contest will begin at 1:00 p.m. on the softball field behind the school.

Exhibits must be removed on Sunday, September 9, from 3:00-6:00 p.m. Any exhibits not removed may be picked up from the school’s Agriculture Center on Tuesday, September 11, from 9:00 a.m.-noon.

By early August, the Community Show booklets can be found in local Thurmont and Emmitsburg area businesses. New residents of the community are urged to enter exhibits—and it is free to enter—and be a part of the Community Show, the largest in the State of Maryland. Please note rule and class changes to Dept. 12’s Arts, Painting & Drawing and Dept. 13’s Arts & Crafts Departments, as well as minor changes to several departments this year. Departments include: Fresh Fruits, Fresh Vegetables, Home Products Display, Canned Fruits, Canned Vegetables, Jellies & Preserves, Pickles, Meats, Baked Products, Sewing & Needlework, Flowers & Plants, Arts, Paintings & Drawings, Crafts, Photography, Corn, Small Grains and Seeds, Eggs, Nuts, Poultry & Livestock, Dairy, Goats, Hay, Junior Department and Youth Department.

Please visit the Community Show’s website for the entry exhibit list, schedule of events, and more information at: www.thurmontemmitsburgcommunityshow.webs.com.

The Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show is sponsored by the Thurmont Grange, Catoctin FFA Chapter, Catoctin FFA Alumni, Maryland State Grange, and the Maryland State Agricultural Fair Board.

 

Senior, Solomon Weisgerber, was selected as this year’s recipient of the “Student Peace Award of Frederick County,” representing  Catoctin High School.

Solomon is recognized at Catoctin High as someone with a positive, caring attitude, who promotes peace among those around him, always smiling and cheerful, willing to hear the other side and respect the opinion of others, someone who will sit down with someone who is struggling or upset in an effort to be of help.

Solomon states, “The name Solomon actually means peaceful, and I act on this by helping others find peace with themselves and in their lives through Jesus Christ.”

Each year, high schools in Frederick County are invited to choose one of their students to receive the “Student Peace Award of Frederick County.” The purpose of the award is to honor students who are helping to make our world a better place by promoting the values of peacemaking, conflict resolution, and respect for all people. This year all eleven public high schools and two private high schools in Frederick County selected a student to receive the award.

The award comes with a $200 check and a $100 contribution to the charity of the student’s choice. For his designated charity, Solomon has chosen Brooke’s House, a home for adult women recovering from alcohol and substance use disorder, located in Hagerstown, Maryland.

Awards were formally presented at a peace conference and awards ceremony held at Friends Meeting School in Ijamsville, on April 14, 2018.

Pictured are Solomon Weisgerber and Catoctin High School Principal Bernard Quesada.

Frederick County Public Schools received the news that Catoctin High School is named a National School of Character. The nonprofit Character.org evaluates character initiatives in schools and communities around the world. Catoctin is the only Maryland high school on the 2018 list of four schools statewide and seventy-three schools making the list nationwide.

The recognition was announced at the May 18 conference of the New Jersey Alliance for Social, Emotional, and Character Development at Rider University. Each year, Character.org and its state affiliates certify schools that demonstrate a dedicated focus on character development, with a positive impact on academic achievement, student behavior, school climate, and their communities. To qualify for national consideration, Catoctin High was already declared a Maryland School of Character, a distinction it has earned each of the past five years.

Character.org will honor Catoctin High School and other National Schools of Character at its 25th National Forum on Character in Washington, D.C., October 4-7, 2018.

It was a long time coming, but a new Mr. Catoctin was chosen on April 5, 2018. Scott Little earned the title after displaying talent, creativity, and an ability to fundraise for Catoctin High School Safe & Sane at the 6th Annual Mr. Catoctin Pageant.

“The experience was pretty awesome, and, obviously, I’m pretty excited about being chosen,” expressed Little.

The event had originally been scheduled for March 2, but it had to be postponed twice: once for wind and once for snow. However, the delay didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of the crowd and the competitors in the Catoctin High School Auditorium on a Thursday evening.

Besides Little, Corbin Deviney, Cameron Hewitt, Matthew Imes, James Kempisty, Sean Miller, Noah Olson, and Noah Wivell had been selected by teachers to compete. Mr. Catoctin is not a beauty pageant, bodybuilding competition, or talent show. It is a fun event to raise money for Catoctin Safe & Sane, on organization that works to help seniors have a safe and fun prom, without drugs and drinking.

The eight competitors were scored on Spirit Week votes (10 percent), program ads and ticket sales (10 percent), donations and auction items (10 percent), the Mr. Catoctin opening number (5 percent), teacher impressions (10 percent), talent (25 percent), formal wear (10 percent), and onstage Q&A (20 percent). Little said that he knew that he had raised the most money among the competitors for program ads and sponsors, but he felt that he did his best with the talent competition, which was a song and dance number that included six back-up dancers.

“I was originally supposed to have twelve back-up dancers,” Little said. “But with the delays, people had to drop out because of sports and other things; I had to make things bigger and better.”

Little explained that he had started planning his talent number very early because of the choreography he wanted.

The weather delays made him both more anxious and more excited about performing, but Little didn’t disappoint as he made his spotlighted entrance from the back of the auditorium to join his dancers on the stage.

Scott Little (chosen as Mr. Catoctin) and Haleigh Bowling, performing at the Mr. Catoctin Pageant in April.

Photo by James Rada, Jr.

The Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show committee met recently to begin planning the 62nd Annual Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show. The show will be held at Catoctin High School, located at 14745 Sabillasville Road in Thurmont, on September 7-9, 2018.  Officers elected at the meeting were: President Rodman Myers, Vice President Robert Valentine, and Secretary Jennifer Martin. Other committee members are Sue Keilholtz, Jessica Valentine, Robert Wiles, David Harman, Niki Eyler, Cheryl Lenhart, Ray Martin, Carol Long, Chip Long, Sharon Lewis, Denise Valentine, Amanda and Paul Dennis, Clifford Stewart, Helen Troxell, Cathy Little, Karen Myers, Sue Sanders, Patty Johnston, Laura Keilholtz, Jim Barth, Kay Barth, Thad Bittner, Amy Jo Poffenberger, and Daniel Myers, and two representatives from the Catoctin FFA Chapter.

On Friday night, the 2018-2019 Catoctin FFA Chapter Ambassador will be announced. In addition, this year’s program will honor the 50th anniversary of Catoctin High School. The baked goods auction will begin immediately following the program, and the grand champion cake, pie and bread will be sold at 9:00 p.m.

Entry of exhibits will take place in the new gymnasium and in the agriculture department area on Thursday, September 6, 6:00-9:00 p.m., and on Friday, September 7, 8:30-11:30 a.m. Judging will begin at 12:30 p.m. Commercial exhibits may be entered on Friday, September 7, from 3:30-5:30 p.m. The show will open to the public at 6:00 p.m.

On Saturday, September 8, the show opens at 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Activities include a Market Goat, Beef, Sheep and Swine Fitting & Showing Contest, from 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m., at the Ag Center at the school. The Pet Show will be held at 10:30 a.m., outside the front of the school. The petting zoo, farm animals, and pony rides will also be held on Saturday and Sunday.

On Saturday night, the Thurmont Grange will serve their turkey and country ham dinner in the school cafeteria, from 3:00-7:00 p.m.  Entertainment for Saturday and Sunday will be announced at a later date. There will be no admission charged for the entertainment.

The 44th Annual Catoctin FFA Alumni beef, sheep & swine sale will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Ag Center area on Saturday night.

Activities begin on Sunday, September 9, at 9:00 a.m., with the Goat Show, followed by the Dairy Show. The Decorated Animal Contest has been eliminated. At noon, the Catoctin FFA Alumni Chicken Bar-B-Que will be held in the cafeteria. The 39th Annual Robert Kaas Horseshoe Pitching Contest will begin at 1:00 p.m. The Log Sawing Contest will begin at 12:30 p.m., under the show tent in the Ag Center area. A Peddle Tractor Contest for kids will be held on Sunday afternoon at 1:00 p.m., also in the Ag Center area, although the times for starting the events may be changed.

Exhibits must be removed on Sunday, September 9, between 3:00-6:00 p.m. Please note the new deadline to pick up items.

If you would like to be a new advertiser in the show booklet, please contact Rodman Myers at 301-271-2104 to obtain advertising information or via email at thurmontemmitsburgcommunityshow@gmail.com. Past advertisers should have recently received letters for advertisements for this year. The deadline for advertisements is May 5, 2018. The Community Show booklets can be found in local Thurmont, Emmitsburg, and surrounding area businesses in late July or early August. New residents of the community are urged to enter and be a part of the Community Show, the largest in the State of Maryland.

There will be changes to some departments. Departments include:  Fresh Fruits, Fresh Vegetables, Home Products Display, Canned Fruits, Canned Vegetables, Jellies & Preserves, Pickles, Meats, Baked Products, Sewing & Needlework, Flowers and Plants, Arts, Paintings & Drawings, Crafts, Photography, Corn, Small Grains and Seeds, Eggs, Nuts, Poultry & Livestock, Dairy, Goats, Hay, Junior Department and Youth Department.

There is no entry fee. Please visit our website for updated information at www.thurmontemmitsburgcommunityshow.webs.com.

The Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show is sponsored by the Thurmont Grange, Catoctin FFA Chapter, Catoctin FFA Alumni, the Maryland State Grange, and the Maryland State Agricultural Fair Board.

Corbin Deviney (pictured left), a senior at Catoctin High School, recently received an appointment to the United States Naval Academy. He will be one of over 1,200 incoming freshmen, and was chosen from a highly competitive pool of nearly 20,000 applicants.

Corbin, the son of Jeff and Heather Deviney of Thurmont, is president of the Catoctin High School Student Government, Vice President of Catoctin High’s National Honor Society, and is active in several other student organizations. He represented Thurmont/Emmitsburg area last summer as a delegate for 2017 Maryland Boys State. He has earned varsity letters in cross country, indoor track, and baseball, and volunteers with an adaptive watersports organization and the Maryland League for People with Disabilities. Corbin will be the fourth generation of his family to serve in the Navy, and he will begin the Naval Academy’s traditional Plebe Summer in late June 2018.

The Thurmont High School Alumni Association will hold its annual banquet on Saturday, June 2, 2018, at the new Thurmont Event Complex, located at 13716 Stratford Drive, which is just off of Lawyer’s Lane, from Route 550 South of Thurmont. Social hour will begin at 5:00 p.m., with the meal served promptly at 6:00 p.m.

The classes ending in 3 or 8 will receive special recognition. Several basket raffles and a 50/25/25 raffle will take place. Five graduating seniors, related to Thurmont High School Alumni, will receive $1,000 scholarships.

The cost for the evening is $23.00 per person, which should be mailed to Viola Noffsinger, 12510 Creagerstown Road, Thurmont, MD 21788 (before May 18).

All alumnus of Thurmont High School and Catoctin High School classes (1969-1972), and friends, are encouraged to attend. Visit the alumni Facebook page: Thurmont High School Alumni Association.

Questions, special reports, or other information may be sent to vmnoff@gmail.com or call 301-898-9898.