Currently viewing the tag: "Waynesboro Pennsylvania"

Elmo (Lawrence “Elmo” Keller) suddenly passed away at a trap shoot in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, on April 29, 2021. He was a fixture at the Thurmont Conservation & Sportsman’s Club, where he looked forward to the competition of shooting trap as often as possible.

“Elmo” looked forward to helping with any youth event since he was “a big kid at heart.” He had a positive impact on the trapshooting community and at the Thurmont Conservation & Sportsman’s Club in Thurmont, always lending a supporting word to youngsters and adults alike.

“He was quite a character,” said his wife, Linda. She explained Elmo’s competitive adventures in bowling, archery, trap, race cars (in the poor man’s class), and fishing.

It wasn’t uncommon for Elmo to take a trip down to the boat ramp at the Club to see the eagles. He appreciated and shared a connection to nature and a love for all of its wonders and critters.

The father and son duo of Tyler and Steve Pinkley from Keedysville, Maryland, dominated the Fort Ritchie Community Center Bass Fishing Tournament. Tyler took first place honors with a 16½-inch bass, while his father, Steve, was one of three participants who tied for third place.

The tournament is held at Lake Royer in Cascade and is sponsored by the Cobblestone Hotel & Suites in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. Forty-two anglers participated in the tournament held on Saturday, September 28, 2019.   

Garrett Gardenour of Smithsburg secured a second-place finish with a 16-inch catch. Joining Pinkley in the tie for third place with a 14¾-inch fish was Jared Vaughn of Knoxville, Maryland, and Gene Helmick, of Middletown, Maryland. Nelson Smith of Cascade recorded a 15-inch fish to win the Military Division. 

The youth division was won by Josh Gregory of Emmitsburg with a 16-inch bass. Hunter Coon of Sharpsburg, Maryland, won second place in the youth division with a 15-inch bass. Seventeen youth participated, including members from the Community Center’s “Kid’s Club” program that meets on Saturday mornings and Tuesday evenings.      

Proceeds from the tournament support the programs and activities at the Fort Ritchie Community Center. For more information or to register for upcoming events, please visit www.thefrcc.org.

Joan Fry

On my way to Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, last week, I noticed demolition work at the foot of Sunshine Trail. What was left of Red Run Cabins was being turned into rubble. According to an article in The Record Herald in 2005, the Red Run Lodge was built of chestnut in 1940, and cabins were added over several years. Red Run Lodge was demolished in 2005, and the cabins were left to disintegrate. I remember the lodge’s famous chicken in the basket.

In 1917, Henry O. Smith bought a twenty-seven-acre tract of land, where he and his family cleared about fifteen acres and grew strawberries and raspberries. When Route 16, the Sunshine Trail, was built in 1938 to replace old Route 16, the new highway split the property in two. Smith donated the eight acres on the north side of Route 16 to the Borough of Waynesboro for Red Run Park, which thrives today with many activities, including car shows, singing entertainment, and miniature train rides for the young at heart.

The lodge was closed in the late 1960s, and the farm continued to sell fruit at the adjoining stand until several years ago. The property was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994, after being purchased by Red Run Enterprises, based in Washington, D.C., from the Smith heirs.

When automobiles made family travel common and travelers wanted a convenient and inexpensive place to rest, new accommodations sprang up along the roadsides across the country. Unlike the downtown hotels, tourist courts and motor inns appeared that were automobile friendly. These “mom and pop” businesses sometimes consisted of cabins in a “U” shape, with one shared bathroom facility and parking in front of each unit.

Local lodges such as Red Run Lodge and Cabins were popular stopovers in the 1930s and 1940s, when passenger trains became a thing of the past and automobiles were the new way to travel. The large hotels around Pen Mar Park in Washington County and Braddock Heights in Frederick County were no longer the latest in lodging for summer visitors from the city.

There were many other motor lodges in the area at the time. In Thurmont, Camp Cozy and Shangri-La Cabins on old Route 15 were keeping up with the times, and Barbara Fritchie Cabins and Francis Scott Key Restaurant and Motel, along Route 40 in Frederick, were catering to the tourist trade.

Barbara Fritchie Cabins was located on Route 40, having forty cabins, steam heat, and private showers. The price for two people ranged from $3.00 to $5.00 per night. The restaurant is still thriving, serving good food and their famous pies.

On my way to Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, last week, I noticed demolition work at the foot of Sunshine Trail. What was left of Red Run Cabins was being turned into rubble. According to an article in The Record Herald in 2005, the Red Run Lodge was built of chestnut in 1940, and cabins were added over several years. Red Run Lodge was demolished in 2005, and the cabins were left to disintegrate. I remember the lodge’s famous chicken in the basket.

In 1917, Henry O. Smith bought a twenty-seven-acre tract of land, where he and his family cleared about fifteen acres and grew strawberries and raspberries. When Route 16, the Sunshine Trail, was built in 1938 to replace old Route 16, the new highway split the property in two. Smith donated the eight acres on the north side of Route 16 to the Borough of Waynesboro for Red Run Park, which thrives today with many activities, including car shows, singing entertainment, and miniature train rides for the young at heart.

The lodge was closed in the late 1960s, and the farm continued to sell fruit at the adjoining stand until several years ago. The property was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994, after being purchased by Red Run Enterprises, based in Washington, D.C., from the Smith heirs.

When automobiles made family travel common and travelers wanted a convenient and inexpensive place to rest, new accommodations sprang up along the roadsides across the country. Unlike the downtown hotels, tourist courts and motor inns appeared that were automobile friendly. These “mom and pop” businesses sometimes consisted of cabins in a “U” shape, with one shared bathroom facility and parking in front of each unit.

Local lodges such as Red Run Lodge and Cabins were popular stopovers in the 1930s and 1940s, when passenger trains became a thing of the past and automobiles were the new way to travel. The large hotels around Pen Mar Park in Washington County and Braddock Heights in Frederick County were no longer the latest in lodging for summer visitors from the city.

There were many other motor lodges in the area at the time. In Thurmont, Camp Cozy and Shangri-La Cabins on old Route 15 were keeping up with the times, and Barbara Fritchie Cabins and Francis Scott Key Restaurant and Motel, along Route 40 in Frederick, were catering to the tourist trade.

Barbara Fritchie Cabins was located on Route 40, having forty cabins, steam heat, and private showers. The price for two people ranged from $3.00 to $5.00 per night. The restaurant is still thriving, serving good food and their famous pies.

Nothing empowers children more than to be involved in a project that allows them to express their true selves. Their opinions, ideas, and dreams can come alive when they work as a team and are guided towards a common goal.  This is seen every day in sports and other physical activities. But children having fun reading and writing? Seems impossible to couple teamwork and literacy, but that is actually what happened with the creation of My Bumblebee and Me, a new children’s book available on Amazon.

Last spring at Miss Sue’s Child Care, located in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, a bumblebee was often seen hovering around the children when leaving the back gate. The children were both curious and fearful of it.  Over time, they decided the bumblebee was quite harmless, and they began to research the insect on different websites. This information allowed the children to be less fearful of the bee and want to assist bumblebees, causing the children to create stories about the bumblebee.

Different theories and stories began to arise from the daycare. “Maybe he is curious about us,” one child remarked. Another child stated, “Perhaps he is trying to protect us.”

Miss Sue encouraged the children to create their own ideas about why the bumblebee was staying at the daycare and used this as inspiration for the book.

“As I wrote the story, I would ask the children their opinion,” commented Miss Sue. “They can be very honest and straightforward with their critiques.  You have to be pretty tough-skinned to ask a young child what they think.  Believe me, they are going to tell you without any hesitation. The story changed direction many times as a result of this.”

The book was edited by Miss Sue’s daughter, Jessica Brown, during the long writing process. After several months of development and revision, Miss Sue personally funded the book by hiring a local illustrator to begin the art work.  Kathleen Renninger of Blue Ridge Summit was hired not only for her talent in art, but also for her expertise in using CreateSpace to get the book published.

The book is dedicated to the children of Miss Sue’s Child Care and has been well received in the area. It is being described as “a delightful story about a young girl who is convinced a bumblebee is trying to be her friend.” Children will delight in this brilliantly colored and beautifully illustrated book, as they experience this fun fantasy-adventure.

Liz believes the bumblebee is following her and her friend, Terry, throughout their day, warning them of danger and pointing out beauty in the world. But Terry is not so sure. Fun facts and information about bumblebees are featured after the story that can empower children with the skills and desire needed to assist this important insect’s survival in our modern world.  A must read for nature lovers of all ages, and an important tool for teachers wishing to strike interest in nature with their students. My Bumblebee and Me is a marvelous addition to your library. Copies of the books are available at Amazon, both in paper form and soon on Kindle, or contact the author for copies at suejames1114@yahoo.com.

by Chris O’Connor

A Snapshot of my Friends at the Farm

It was kismet that I met David and Marge Harman of Sunnyside Hill Farm in Sabillasville, around fifteen years ago. My daughter attended school in Emmitsburg; but, after two years, we made the fortuitous choice to transfer her to Sabillasville Elementary.  One day, I happily noticed that the Harmans had round hay bales for sale, and so began our friendship.

Driving to the new school was down Route 550 that dissects the Sunnyside Hill Farm’s picturesque farm fields like a lazy river at an amusement park. Over the years, I’ve noticed that the road has become more like a Grand Prix race course, where most don’t heed the speed limit or the signs that indicate a farm entrance just over a blind hill.

After meeting the Harmans, I broke my leg.  Marge Harman would drive me to the doctor in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, then we’d go eat at the former Waynesboro Mountain Gate Restaurant. Then it was on to rehab in Thurmont after the cast was removed until I finally regained some function of my busted wheel.  Marge would haul me down there, then back to the farm where she’d fix me something to eat, then she’d run me back to the house where I strived to limp another day.

Very early one summer morning, I went to their farm to spend a few hours on the front lawn to view the Perseid meteor showers. David and Marge got up at the crack of dawn and went into town, returning with fresh donuts. I went inside shortly after, and David fixed me bacon and eggs. Bacon and eggs are especially delectable when one is covered in morning dew.

When I go for hay, David ties the bales down with quick-release knots. Knot-tying is one of many lessons David learned during his formative years climbing the ranks of the Boy Scouts of America. He was inspired to a life of service and hard work then, earning innumerable badges while helping build camp sites and the lake for the scouts at Camp Tuckahoe near Biglerville, Pennsylvania. He often aided the camp’s cook by “bugling” in the scouts for chow time.

David became an Eagle Scout, honing many life skills, including swimming and lifesaving. Few know that David saved a boy’s life when the boy panicked and found himself in too deep in a pond.

David and Marge became acquainted in 1955 while he was a produce manager at Acme Grocery store in Gettysburg. Marge happened in one December evening with members of her family.

Marge is the second to the youngest of Pauline and Walter “Buck” Lantz’s five kids. David strived to visit the farm to join in the celebration of Marge’s sixteenth birthday, but was unable to find the farm that her parents acquired in 1942.

David recalls how folks he approached to get directions were confused when he referred to Marge’s father as Walter Lantz. 

The second time David came to Sabillasville looking for directions to Walter Lantz’s place, someone asked if he was referring to “Buck” Lantz. Bingo! David finally found the farm and the girl of his dreams.  They learned they shared a sense of morals, work ethic, humility…and a sense of humor.

The rest is history.

David and Marge married in June 1958. He shipped out to Army boot camp in New Jersey for six months, before transferring to radar school at Ft. Sill in Lawton, Oklahoma.

David, home on leave for their first wedding anniversary, brought Marge a dozen roses. Then they packed a ’55 Plymouth to the gills.   Soon, it was pedal to the metal, westward-bound for the high desert of Ft. Carson, Colorado Springs, Colorado, a marked contrast to the verdant hills of north central Maryland. At Ft. Carson, David was promoted to the rank of sergeant.

Upon discharge from the Army, David secured a position at The Thurmont Bank as consumer loans manager. He spent a few decades there, during which time the bank changed hands in succession by Suburban, Sovran, CNS Sovran, then Nations bank. He played all positions in the bank: manager of consumer loans, teller, and head teller, until being promoted to manager in 1981, where he remained until his retirement in 1993.  

All the while, David helped his father-in-law, Buck, with the farm.  David would milk the dairy cows in the morning, then clean up and go to work at the bank. He urged Buck to acquire a baler to help streamline the hay harvest. At that point, they were harvesting using one of two mules and storing hay in loose stacks in the mow.

These days, Marge and David, their sons, extended family, and good friends throw in together, whether its time to sow or harvest or help is needed with the endless chores. 

They raise crops to feed livestock, which has included dairy cows, mules, hogs, chickens, goats, cattle, and their pet donkeys. Now they market beef, hay, straw, corn, and soybeans.

Generations of accumulated knowledge, work ethic, modern farm equipment, newer outbuildings, and mechanical acumen has been integral to the success of a farm. Common sense, mathematical ability, and team work are important—especially now considering the increasingly demanding regulatory environment that requires ever-mounting paperwork and accountability as to any farmer’s methods and practices.

The Harmans strive to maintain their way of life while balancing the vagaries of nature and considering the complexities of all the external variables.  

That being said, visiting my adopted home place is more fun than a barrel of monkeys.   

And I’ve never left hungry.

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Marge and David Harman

Photo by Deb Spalding