Currently viewing the tag: "Sabillasville Elementary School"

Joan Bittner Fry

As I peruse more “stuff” in my house, I look back 70-some years to my days as a patrolman at Sabillasville Elementary School.  Some of my teachers were Naomi Martin Waynant, Margaret Leatherman Dutrow, Loretta Kincaid, and Maurice Clarke.

When a student arrived at the upper grades, a coveted duty was to become a safety patrolman.  The Automobile Association of America (AAA) sponsored School Safety Patrol, and it was an honored position, which began in 1922. It was established for traffic safety, but since we had no streets to cross, our assignments were hall patrolman, recess patrolman, or bus patrolman. This was quite a position to hold since one could be the boss of one’s peers for a time and then take names and report findings to higher-ups, namely teachers. We wore a patrolman’s canvas belt and were issued badges.  Mine says “Patrolman School Safety Patrol” centered with AAA.

Rules and regulations included: reporting for duty on time, performing duties faithfully, striving to prevent accidents, always setting a good example, and reporting dangerous activities of other students. Approval of a parent or guardian was required before taking on this position.

I couldn’t be a bus patrolman since my siblings and neighbors and I walked over a mile to school. I was a hallway patrolman. Some infractions were running the steps, pushing or shoving, talking, chewing gum, or otherwise being unruly. Bullying was not in our vocabulary; however, circumstances weren’t much different from today. Even then there were fellow students who wanted to be first, those who had to speak out, and others who wanted to bend the rules. We just didn’t have a name for it, and maybe that was a good thing.

Going on to Thurmont in eighth grade, the School Safety Patrol took a trip to Washington, D.C., where we marched in the annual parade.  The photo above is of Charlie Wastler (whom I met in eighth grade at Thurmont High School) and me on that trip. We became lifelong friends. Notice Charlie’s belt and cap. This was 1951 and may have been the first bus trip I ever took.  The other photo is my collection of School Safety Patrol memorabilia (above, left).

Article by Jane Savage, Administrative Secretary, Sabillasville Elementary

Many parents currently serving on the Sabillasville Elementary School (SES) Parent Group, Inc. are SES Alumni. They started chatting about all the great memories they had of the spring bazaar that was held years ago when they were students, and they wanted to give current students and the community an opportunity to create their own memories, as well, so they re-created the event. They hoped the bazaar would raise funds for the SES Parent Group. Currently, the Parent Group provides activities and educational resources for the students including field trips, cultural arts activities, subscriptions to online reading programs and books, magazines and classroom supplies, and events throughout the year.   

The SES Parent Group revived the bazaar three years ago, and it has grown significantly each year. This year’s Planning Committee consisted of Alisha Yocum (coordinator), Priscilla Blentlinger, Dawn Fisher, Dawn Harbaugh, and Kelsey Norris.  Parent Group members volunteered to put on the bazaar, as well as families, community members, and staff. Alisha Yokum said, “We tried to re-create the event so that it would just be a day of good family fun, while supporting the school. We included ‘old-fashioned’ carnival games, some of which were the same as when it took place 30 years ago. Back then, an auctioneer auctioned off donations from local businesses. This time, we changed that to be a silent auction. We received so much support from businesses within the community, as well as the surrounding communities, through donations to the silent auction.”  The school receives much support from the community and surrounding communities in many different ways all year. Contributors include individuals, businesses, and service organizations. In the past, the bazaar was held the Saturday before Mother’s Day; and plants that were purchased from the Ag classes at the high school were sold at the bazaar. This year, the bazaar was held the first Saturday in June.

In the past, a pie in the face contest, where the principal took a pie in the face from students who won a raffle, was a highly anticipated activity. (Mrs. Severance started this activity when she was the principal).

In sticking with re-creating just “good fun,” the Parent Group decided to broaden the Pie in the Face contest with four staff members volunteering to be candidates. Students cast their votes and Mrs. Krietz (Principal) topped the contest with just over 8,100 votes. Two lucky winners (Abbey Sparkman and Hope LeGore) were then selected from a raffle to smash the pie in her face on the day of the event. A pie in the face of the principal was sure to draw a crowd to the event because who doesn’t want to see the principal take a pie to the face!

About the cover photo: Dalton Wolfe (boy in orange shirt), Noah Bradbury (boy in tank top), and Maycee Grimes (girl in pink shirt) observe as Abbey Sparkman smooshes a pie in SES Principal’s Kate Krietz’ face.

Pictured above: Alayna Sowers (age 8) plucks a duckie for a prize.

Pictured above: Kyle Mullennex is the winner (safety yellow shirt) of a Cake Walk.

Pictured above: Baked goods have always been a big seller at the bazaar.

Pictured above: Even the smallest of tractors competes in the Tractor Show.

Theresa Dardanell

See someone alone. Reach out and help. Start With Hello! In September, Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS) participated in the third annual Sandy Hook Promise Start With Hello Week. This national anti-violence campaign encourages students to reduce social isolation with acts of kindness that starts with just saying hello. Schools created activities to promote a welcoming and inclusive place for all students.

Catoctin High School

Catoctin High School (CHS) students started the week by decorating outside the cafeteria with slogans to promote the Sandy Hook Promise Campaign. On “Hey Day Thursday,” students and staff were given name tags and the challenge was to greet new people. Representatives from the Mental Health Association distributed information, and students were given the opportunity to sign up for the Out of the Darkness Walk. A team will represent CHS during this walk at Baker Park. On “Green Out Friday,” students and staff wore green in support of the campaign, and a group picture was taken of students spelling out “Hello” on the baseball field. School Social Worker Debbie Wivell said, “It was wonderful to see many students and staff participate in the Hey Day. This early in the year, teachers and students are still getting to know each other and this is important. Green Out day was also a success.”

Thurmont Middle School

Students at Thurmont Middle School (TMS) had lots of opportunities to connect with each other. On “Hey Day Monday,” they started by saying hello to new people. The challenge on Tuesday was to make sure no one sat alone at lunch. TMS student Charlotte Bradley said, “I really liked the lunch activity of not sitting alone, where we sat with students based on our interests. The lunch activity seemed to really encourage inclusiveness and connectedness with students that we don’t normally talk to.” School Counselors Becky Krauss and Sherry Bueso agreed that Wednesday’s activity was also very successful. They said, “We are thinking that the positive post-it-notes were the most successful because most of our students participated in their classes. Students left positive, encouraging messages on their desks to be received by the next student sitting there.” The challenge on Friday was to perform a random act of kindness for a teacher or student. Principal Daniel Enck said, “The various activities that our students, staff, and community members participated in throughout the week helped bring our school community closer together. Additionally, the activities allowed students to see the benefits of reaching out to other students who they may not typically interact with. I can’t thank our students, staff, and community members enough for all of their efforts in making Start with Hello week such a success.”

Thurmont Elementary School

Students at Thurmont Elementary School especially enjoyed having community members greet them in the mornings during the week.  Special guests included directors from the FCPS central office; Mayor John Kinnaird; Keyote, the Frederick Keys mascot; athletes and cheerleaders from Catoctin High School; members of the Thurmont Police Department; Boy Scout Leaders; and employees of the local Kountry Kitchen restaurant. Activities during the week were geared toward making all students feel welcome. They had daily ice breakers during lunch and courtesy lessons on how to introduce yourself to a new person. Darby Carson said, “It helps people and makes them feel like they matter. I think we should keep doing it and let that legacy live on.” Claire Daly said, “It is helpful for those kids who don’t have a lot of friends. They won’t be so lonely.” Tyler McCallion said, “Once you get to know people more, you realize you could be really good friends.” Shalina Weitzel said, “Start With Hello Week makes us feel inspired to help other kids.” School Counselor Tammy Brotman said, “I think this is a really important message to give our students.  Having Start with Hello Week gives students both the opportunity but most of all the courage to try reaching out to others.  We are trying to build a culture of kindness, and this is a great way to continue to support that goal and really make it a genuine part of what we’re about at TES.”

Sabillasville Elementary School

Sabillasville Elementary School (SES) students started the week with one important word: Hello. On Tuesday, they wore clothing that displayed something about themselves so that they could learn about each other. School Counselor Niki Kayser said, “The students and staff really enjoyed sharing why they chose the shirt they did. It encouraged them to learn a little more about their peers’ interests.” Students performed random acts of kindness on Wednesday and participated in special activities on Thursday and Friday.  Kayser said that she received positive feedback from staff and students and heard the comment, “It’s important to be kind all the time!” many times during the week. She also said, “I feel this message is wonderful! It’s a simple way to help create a more connected and inclusive school community. This message reminds us to encourage and support one another on a daily basis, and to understand how important it is to help students learn how to be accepting of others and to see that all it takes to make a difference is just a few simple words.”

Emmitsburg Elementary School

Emmitsburg Elementary School (EES) will be incorporating the idea of friendship throughout the school year to support the Leader In Me Positive Behavior Intervention System. Activities for the week included wearing green on Monday, signing a school banner on Tuesday, breakfast buddies on Wednesday, sharing stickers on Thursday, and making posters on Friendship Friday. School Counselor Sarah Fawley said, “The students really enjoyed working with other students in making their posters. They enjoyed the morning greeters in the front lobby, who greeted students with ‘hello’ and passed out stickers and pencils.” She said that students were more aware of others; they invited other students to sit with them at lunch.

Fawley also said, “This message is very important. There is so much power in five little letters (Hello) that can impact someone’s day or life forever.”

Starting the Day by saying “Hello” at Thurmont Elementary School: Dr. Keith Harris, FCPS executive director of Accelerating Achievement & Equity; Debra O’Donnell, TES principal; students, Adania Kreitz, Darby Carson, Carolyn Mercer, Claire Daly, Tyler McCallion, Chase Jackson, Summer Bostic, Tristan Lease, Shalini Weitzel, Warren Schafer; and Thurmont Mayor John Kinnaird.

Photo by Theresa Dardanell

Deerfield United Methodist Church

Sabillasville

Once a year, a little country church with a small congregation hosts an event that is standing room only. Joined by members of several churches and the community, Deerfield United Methodist Church brings a 2000-year-old event to life. “The Journey to the Cross”, a live passion play, is performed on Palm Sunday and Good Friday every year. The production covers miracles and other events in the life of Christ through his last days and resurrection.

During the rest of the year, members of the congregation worship together at 10:15 a.m. on Sunday mornings. Along with readings, prayers, hymns, and a message by Pastor Ray Dudley, everyone enthusiastically participates in “passing the peace of Christ” with handshakes and hugs. A communion service, held on the first Sunday of the month, is followed by refreshments.

Community service is an important part of their ministry. Pastor Ray said, “If there is a need that arises in the community, we go ahead and help as much as we can with it. There was a need for a chair lift and we gave funds to help buy that chair lift.” Several families in need are provided with food for a meal at Thanksgiving and gifts for children and the elderly at Christmas. Teachers at Sabillasville Elementary school, which is located less than a mile from the church, are treated to a “back to school” luncheon each year. Kate Krietz, Sabillasville Elementary School Principal, said that the staff is very grateful for the annual home-cooked luncheon and they appreciate the generosity of the church. Deerfield United Methodist also supports families doing mission work. Colorfest gives the church members the opportunity to raise funds to support these outreach programs. With the help of friends, they not only have a food stand, they also park cars and rent spaces to vendors.

The tight-knit group enjoys social activities throughout the year. The Mother’s Day Tea is a family event. Appetizers, soup, scones, sandwiches, tea and desserts are served to the ladies by husbands and children. Of course, there is a Father’s Day breakfast for the dads. The annual summer picnic is held in the Thurmont Community Park. In the fall, everyone enjoys a hayride and bonfire complete with hot dogs and marshmallows. During the Christmas season, they go Christmas caroling at nursing homes and at the homes of shut-ins. During the cold winter months, there are movie nights in the church hall.

The history of the church began in 1878 with revival services held in a log school house in Smithfield (which later became Deerfield). In 1879, the Smithfield United Brethren Church was built on land purchased for the sum of $25. The church became the Evangelical United Brethren Church in 1946. The final name change occurred in 1968 when they joined with the Methodist Church. The Deerfield United Methodist Church is located at 16405 Foxville Deerfield Road near Sabillasville. Join them for the 10:15 a.m. Sunday service. You will feel very welcomed.

Pastor Ray Dudley (back row on the left) with members of the Deerfield United Methodist Church.

Rev. Bob Kells

The last day of school is always filled with excitement for the students of Sabillasville Elementary School, as they prepare to head out for their summer break. For the past four years, several local churches have made this an extra special time by bringing the children books to read over the summer.

It started in 2015 when I joined the school’s volunteer program, along with several members from Weller UMC in Thurmont where I am the pastor. Volunteers at Sabillasville work with the children for an hour or more each week. We help them with reading and math, and whatever other tasks the teachers have for them. The work is personally fulfilling for the volunteers and is fun for the children, who look forward to working with the adults.

In the spring of 2015, I was volunteering with the kindergarten class. Summer was approaching and, as their teacher shared with me, summer is a time when the children are at risk of losing ground in many of the skills they developed during the year. Reading is one of those skills. I also learned some of the children do not have many books to read at home. That last piece of information got me thinking that this was something the church could help with.

After talking it over with Sabillasville Elementary School Principal Kate Kreitz, I asked our Missions Team to organize a book drive for the kindergarten class. The Thurmont Lions Club, which I joined the year before, has as one of its missions to promote literacy.  The Lions Club pitched in and donated book bags. The response was tremendous. We collected enough books that first year that each kindergartner got to take home seven books.

After the first year, the book drive grew to cover the entire school. We got some additional support from Deerfield UMC in Sabillasville, who agreed to cover the kindergarten books, while two other churches from nearby Rocky Ridge joined in to collect books for the other grades. Once again, the results were impressive. On the last day of school, each of the 120 children received a Lions Club book bag and three books of their choice.

The school book drive is fast becoming an annual tradition for these churches and the school they support.  This year, all of the children received three or four books; pencils and stickers; a book bag; and a card from the churches, wishing them a good summer and “Happy Reading!”

Not only is the book drive helping with the school, but Deerfield UMC has begun hosting a luncheon for the teachers and staff at Sabillasville at the start of the school year. “It’s a great time for the teachers to relax, to unwind, and to just socialize before classes start,” said Deerfield’s pastor, Ray Dudley.

The teachers help to shape the lives of the children to make the world a better place. By serving a luncheon, Deerfield shares the love of Jesus in the community.

The book drive and the teachers’ luncheon are just two ways local churches can give to the community. Both keep the churches engaged with their communities, and both contribute to the education of the children.

The children are the focus of these efforts. My hope and prayer is that they receive more than just the books. My hope and prayer is they’ll remember that in addition to their teachers and administrators, they have local churches that love them with the love of Jesus and want to see them to succeed—in school and in life.

Pictured from left: (standing) Pastor Ray Dudley (Deerfield UMC), Pastor Bob Kells (Weller UMC), Par Alexander, Henry Alexander, Joan Staub, Jim Monroe; (kneeling at table) SES Principal Kate Krietz; and four Sabillasville Elementary students.

 

It is time to recognize the special teacher who has made an impact on your child’s life and on your school community. Do you know a teacher who goes beyond what is expected? You can let this teacher know how important he/she has been to you by nominating him/her for the Thurmont Lions’ Teacher of the Year award. Anyone can nominate a teacher—parents, students, fellow teachers, and administrators.

This award is open to Pre-K through Grade 12, full-time teachers, in the Catoctin feeder school system: Catoctin High School, Thurmont Middle School, Thurmont Primary School, Thurmont Elementary School, Lewistown Elementary School, Emmitsburg Elementary School, Sabillasville Elementary School, and Mother Seton School.

All nominees will be recognized at a reception to be held on May 1, 2017, at the Thurmont Elementary School. The Teacher of the Year will be selected from these finalists by a committee of community leaders and will be announced at the Thurmont Lions’ Education Night on May 10, 2017.

Nomination forms are available at www.thurmontlionsclub.com and at the Thurmont Regional Library. You may also pick up a form at your child’s school. Nomination forms (which include all the information necessary for submitting) are due no later than April 7, 2017. If you have any questions, please contact Lion Joyce Anthony at jananny@comcast.net or 240-288-8748.

On Friday, June 3, 2016, volunteers of Sabillasville Elementary School were honored with breakfast and a video made by all the students. It was a time to meet other volunteers who may be on different schedules.

The school qualified for a Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) certificate. This certificate is used when the Frederick County Board of Education discusses school closing, grant writing, and other decisions made for the local school.

To qualify for this certificate, a school must have twice the number of volunteer hours as there are students. Sabillasville Elementary needed 236 hours to qualify, but totaled 1,676—quite an accomplishment!

Each volunteer received a pin, along with a certificate designating their number of volunteer hours and signed by President of the Board of Education Brad Young and by Superintendent of Schools Theresa R. Alban.

Deb Spalding

DSC_1904Throughout its fifty year history, teachers at Sabillasville Elementary School (SES) have shared sound knowledge with its children to give them a solid foundation; administrators have shown its children, by example, how to be honorable citizens and friends; community members have cared for the children by offering support and showing up when they’ve been needed.

November 18, 2015 was the 50th anniversary celebration of Sabillasville Elementary School at its “new” location (for the past fifty years) at 16210-B Sabillasville Road in Sabillasville.

Words learned as a student at SES make up this article. They convey heart-felt appreciation for being one of the lucky ones who was taught in this place. Learning at SES is warm and fuzzy, yet worldly and adventurous. Memories of learning here make one humble and so appreciative!

Grand people have attended SES. They live all over the world, around the corner, and across the street. They’ve achieved honor and impacted others. They’ve done for others as the teachers, administrators, and community at SES did for them. During the celebrations, some of these people traveled through the halls of the school and the media center where class photos and memorabilia were displayed.

The night’s ceremony started with a welcome from SES Principal, Kate Krietz. The Camp David Color Guard gave the Presentation of the Flags, just like they did at the twenty-five year anniversary celebration of the school.

Kate Krietz recalled that Joan Fry, a current volunteer at the school, had delivered a cake for the teachers on the first day the school was open to students in 1965. Ms. Fry was in attendance at the ceremony, and has written about the history of SES and former Sabillasville schools. Her three children attended SES.

SES students sang for the audience. “The National Anthem” was sung by McKenna Gisriel; Charlie McGinnis crooned “I Love the Mountains,” and students in the Cougar chorus roared the Sabillasville School Song and “My Town, My World.”

Time capsules, one for the twenty-five year celebration, one for the forty year celebration, and now one for the fifty year celebration, were available to view. The fifty year capsule includes special items from each class: kindergarten students made a book called “When we grow up” in which each student wrote about what they want to be when they grow up; first graders took selfies then paired the photo with a drawing of what they think they will look like when they graduate high school; second grade students created an All About Me activity; third grade students made a booklet with all of the reasons why they love SES with pictures; fourth grade students filled in the sentence, “When I think of Sabillasville, I think that…” with their thoughts; fifth grade students shared their favorite memory at SES. The time capsules were buried the following school day.

Jennifer Mullinex, President of the Sabillasville Elementary Parent Group, introduced special guests. Mark Pritts represented the Frederick County Board of Education for the evening. He was a new teacher in 1984 and 1985, assigned to SES. He remembered some people at SES whom he said, “…helped raise me to get started in my career” as a teacher. He remembered SES teachers Mrs. Buzzell, Mrs. Lingg, and Mrs. Dinterman, long-time secretary Mrs. Shirley Brown, cafeteria cook Mrs. Millie Eyler, and custodian Mr. Jack Miller. He expressed that he was very much supported by the staff and the community.

The next guest speaker, Brenda Main, is an SES alumna, who now works with the Frederick County Public Schools Transportation Department. She reminisced that she had Mrs. Summers in first grade, Mrs. Glover in second grade, Mrs. Tucker in third grade, and Mrs. Hodge in fourth grade. She remembered Mr. Jack Miller who she said, “…was so much more than a custodian. He greeted us when we arrived and wished us a good evening when we went home. About Millie Eyler in the cafeteria, she said, “She made the best darn pigs-in-the-blankets ever!”

Brenda started her bus driving career driving bus #57 at SES. Some of the students she drove home now have children of their own attending the school. For the last nine years, Brenda has been a bus driver instructor and said she brings every new driver up to SES. She said, “This is God’s country. I tell them the history here. Most people don’t realize the school is here. I teach them to drive these roads.”

Karen Locke, a former principal at SES stated, “Sabillasville Elementary School is Frederick County’s best public private school. This is the model that all schools should be made from. The personal touch, small class sizes, and dedicated community where the school is the heart. You’ve gotta love…this…school! Be proud that you went to Sabillasville.”

Special thanks to members of the 50th Anniversary Planning Committee for their coordination of the celebration; to the Sabillasville Elementary Parent Group for their support; to Pastor Bob Kells of Weller Methodist Church in Thurmont for his delivery of the Invocation; and to Reverend Mike Simane of St. Mark’s Lutheran Church and St. John’s UCC in Sabillasville for his prayer and benediction.

Photographed on the stage where hundreds of class photos have been taken over the years, current and former staff of Sabillasville Elementary School are shown. First row left to right: Nicki Lingg (Kindergarten Teacher 1971-2001); Melanie Raynor, (music teacher); Kate Krietz, (Principal); Michele Firme, (Special Ed Program Assistant); Jennifer Rutherford, (Special Ed); Jim McGivern (5th Grade teacher 1986-1993); Haleh Paciotti (Literacy Specialist). Second row left to right: Barbara Buzzell (Media Specialist 1979-2002);  Brenda Smith (former student 5th & 6th grade when the school opened and taught 3rd & 4th Grades 1990-2008); Karen Locke (former Principal); Barbara Doney (4th Grade teacher); Shari Austin (reading intervention and 5th grade language arts teacher); Tamara Savage (Special Ed Instructional Assistant); Jane Orlando (Instructor Assistant); Tanya Wantz (2nd Grade Teacher); Janet (Tucker) Dinterman (Third Grade teacher 1971-1989). Back rows left to right: Mark Pritts (5th Grade Teacher 1984-1986); Peggy Laster (Aide 1965-1975); Jean Glover (2nd & 1st Grade Teacher 1972-1987); Maureen Schildt (5th Grade); Rose Hatcher (custodian); Heidi Hench (art teacher); Marnie Mortenson (3rd grade 19th year); Melinda Bentz (13th year Kindergarten); Michelle Mapes (Math Specialist and Tech Coordinator); Pam Ellenberg (1st Grade teacher 15 years); Jodie Miller (Lead Custodian 14 years); Karen Adams (2nd grade 1986-1997); Sue Valenti (1st grade 1986-2001); Paula Bowman (Secretary 25 years).

50th Anniversary Planning Committee

DSC_1913

Angie Hahn, Barb Messner, Michele Firme, Shelly McConnell, Jane Savage, Alisha Yocum, Jennifer Mullinex, and Kate Krietz.

Words For Thirds

The National Grange, founded in 1867, is a nonprofit, nonpartisan fraternal organization that advocates for rural America and agriculture. With strong history in grassroots activism, family values, and community service, the Grange is part of more than 2,100 hometowns across the United States. The Thurmont Grange serves our Catoctin region. One of the programs administered annually by the Grange is Words for Thirds, where every third grade student in the local area is given a dictionary to keep.

Emmitsburg Elementary School

Ebg Dictionaries

Pictured from left are: (front row) Dillan Ecker, Austin Morris, Fallon Wolfe, Darrin Frey; (second row) Alayna Kelly, Lauren Kelly, Alyssa Costa, Katie Topper; (back row) Mike Brown, Emmitsburg Elementary School third grade teacher; and Thurmont Grange members, Bob Whiles and Cliff Stewart.

Thurmont Elementary School

TES dictionaries

Pictured from left are Carol and Bob Long, Thurmont Grange; Susan Crone and Kate Gray, TES third grade teachers; Christina McKeever, TES Principal; Sandy and Jim Moser, Thurmont Grange; (front row) third grade students: Gabe Fussa, Brady Wehage, Maura Eyler, Jackson Savage, and Erin Miller.

Sabillasville Elementary School

Sabillasville dictionaries (1)

Pictured from left are: (first row) third grade students Kylie Putman, Mason Newcomer, and Hannah Wolfe; (back row) Kate Krietz, SES Principal; Rodman Myers, Jim Royer; and Robert McAfee of the Thurmont Grange; Marnie Mortenson, third grade teacher; and Jane Savage, Thurmont Grange and SES administrative specialist.

Show Your Cougar Spirit

The Catoctin High School Sports Boosters will be selling Cougar clothing (sweatpants, sweatshirts, and T-shirts), blankets, stadium seats, hats, and other miscellaneous Cougar items at the following home sporting events: Tuesday, December 8—Girls Basketball, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Friday, December 11—Girls Basketball, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Monday, December 14—Boys Basketball, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, December 16—Wrestling, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Friday, December 18—Boys Basketball, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Items will be available on the above dates in the hallway between the gymnasiums. Payment may be made by cash, check, or credit card. Do some shopping for Christmas!

Catoctin High School Class of 2016 Safe and Sane Events

Tickets are on sale for the Dance and Silent Auction at the Thurmont American Legion on December 12, 2015, for $15.00 per person and $25.00 per couple. Doors open at 8:00 p.m. They are in need of items for the silent auction. To donate an item/basket or to purchase/sell tickets, please contact Barb Sellers at B1sellers@msn.com or Tracy Barbour at scruffy1kp@msn.com.

At the dance, they will be drawing the winning ticket for the iPad Air II. Tickets are still available for $5.00 each. Contact Dawn Shugars at 240-357-8121 to purchase or sell.

Wing Night/Football Bash is gearing up as well, featuring all-you-can-eat wings! The date is set for January 15, 2016. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Superbowl squares! Tickets on sale for $25.00. Please contact Dawn Shugars at 240-357-8121 to purchase or sell tickets.

Camper raffle is on-going. Tickets are $10.00. Please contact Tracy Barbour at scruffy1kp@msn.com.

All events benefit Catoctin High School’s Class of 2016 Safe and Sane event following graduation.

Scholarships Available

The Frederick Business & Professional Women’s Club is now accepting scholarship applications. Scholarships will be awarded to women currently enrolled in and attending a college-level course study. Requirements include that women must be a resident of Frederick County, Maryland, and must show financial need. Graduating high school seniors and those who have already earned at least a bachelor’s degree are not eligible for this scholarship.

Applications and other documents must be postmarked by January 31, 2016. For applications and information email mpoole199@aol.com.

Mother Seton School Students Recognized for Citizenship

The Christian Character Trait program is once again active at Mother Seton School. Each month, teachers nominate those students they feel best demonstrate the featured trait for that month. For September, the following students were recognized for exemplifying the Christian Character Trait of Citizenship: Quinn Alley (Grade 8); Matthias Buchheister (Grade 7); Mia Ferraro and Raphaela Smaldone (Grade 6); Joseph Torborg (Grade 5); Luke Iferd and Timothy McCarthy (Grade 4); Brady Koenig (Grade 3); Camila Canadas-Fraga and Anthony Rosato (Grade 2); William Adams and Jacob Marron (Grade 1); Grady Abruzzese and Francis Rosato (Kindergarten); Greyson Jurchak and Anna Long (Pre-K).

Pictured from left are: (front row) Brady Koenig (Grade 3), Anthony Rosato (Grade 2), Camila Canadas-Fraga (Grade 2), Jacob Marron (Grade 1), William Adams (Grade 1), Francis Rosato (Kindergarten), Grady Abruzzese (Kindergarten), Anna Long (Pre-K); (back row) Quinn Alley (Grade 8), Matthias Buchheister (Grade 7), Mia Ferraro (Grade 6), Emma Wivell (Grade 6), Joseph Torborg (Grade 5), Luke Iferd (Grade 4), Timothy McCarthy (Grade 4). Not pictured: Greyson Jurchak (Pre-K).

Sabillasville Elementary School Holds 1st Annual 5K/1-Mile Fun Run

Sabillasville Elementary School (SES) hosted it’s 1st Annual Sabillasville Scenic 5K/1-Mile Fun Run on November 15, 2015. The event was organized by the SES-Parent Group. The proceeds will provide cultural arts programs and field trips for the students of SES. Event coordinators had both families and single runners sign up to fully enjoy the scenic route, cheered on by students and spectators. They look forward to hosting it again next year!

Participants begin their run/walk with enthusiasm out front of Sabillasville Elementary School during the 1st Annual Sabillasville Scenic 5K/1-Mile Fun Run on November 15, 2015.

C. L. Harbaugh

The weekend of October 10 and 11, 2015, featured cloudless blue skies and crisp fall temperatures, a glorious greeting for those participants who journeyed just a few miles off of the beaten trail to enjoy a less crowded, slower pace at the Sabillasville’s Annual Mountain Fest and 32nd Annual Kenny Clabaugh Car Show. Sponsored by the Northwestern Frederick County Civic Association (NWFCCA), the proceeds from the car show benefit the organization’s ongoing commitment to three annual scholarships awarded to deserving students within the local community.

Saturday, with temperatures in the 60s and no rain in site, participants enjoyed the beautiful day at Sabillasville Elementary School in the Catoctin Mountains, just a short distance from Thurmont. Over twenty vendors sold everything from antiques, crafts, and jewelry to homemade cakes and cookies.

Again this year, the food was provided by the popular and delicious Ron Eyler’s Country Cougars Pit Stop Pit Beef Sandwiches out of Rocky Ridge. Ice Cream was again provided by Antietam Dairy of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. Local Churches, including St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Sabillasville, St. Stephens UCC in Cascade, and Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, sold homemade baked goods.

Saturday’s entertainment was provided by a Gospel Bluegrass Band. Entertainment for Sunday was provided by Twin Hill Express Bluegrass Gospel Band, a favorite among returning visitors each year.

Sunday marked the 32nd Annual Kenny Carbaugh Memorial Car Show. Again, mild temperatures and clear blue skies greeted this year’s partici-pants. The show was very successful, with over one hundred cars registered, including antique pickup trucks, fire trucks, sports cars, and a rare BMW car. Car show chairman, Jason Worth, awarded twenty-five top-voted plaques. Best of Show was awarded to Gerald Poffenburger from Hagerstown for his 1941 Plymouth Two-Tone Pickup Truck. Dash plaques were handed out to the first fifty entrants, and over twenty doorsprizes (which were donated from local businesses) were also handed out to ticket winners. Thanks to all who donated.

Many antique car owners attended the show for the camaraderie and common interest. Entertainment for the car show was provided by local DJ, Steve Hahn, for the third year. Thanks to Lori Worth and Harp Worth for their continued support and assistance with the car show.

Volunteer members of the Civic Association often hear that many venture to the Mountain Fest to enjoy the country atmosphere with the surrounding picturesque farms and orchards, the slower pace, and the safer environment for their families. The NWFCCA would like to thank the many volunteers who helped to make Mountain Fest weekend such a success. Those who merit special thanks for their many years of service are Kenny Howard; Arthur and Sarah Gernand; Edgar Hatter; and Ed Coleman and his daughter, Donna.

We at the Civic Association would again like to thank you for your continued support and commitment to the NWFCCA and the community! On a personal note, I would like to recognize my mother, Shirley Lee Harbaugh, of Sabillasville, and who was raised in Greenstone, Pennsylvania. Mom was a charter member of NWFCCA in good standing for over thirty years. She was always thoughtful and supportive and available whenever help was needed. Mom passed away in late May 2015. I loved my mother very much, and she will be missed by many that knew her, especially by Dad and me.

Photos by C. L. Harbaugh Photography

Mountain Fest 2

Best of Show was awarded to Gerald Poffenburger of Hagerstown for his 1941 Plymouth Pickup Truck at the 32nd Annual Kenny Clabaugh Car Show at Mountain Fest on October 11, 2015.

Upcoming Anniversary Events

Sabillasville Elementary School’s 50th Anniversary will be honored during the opening ceremonies of the Thurmont and Emmitsburg Community Show on Friday, September 11, beginning at 7:00 p.m., in the auditorium at Catoctin High School. The school’s staff, faculty, and students are encouraged to attend. It is hoped that a record crowd attends so that many fond memories can be remembered, and former classmates can reunite.

Save the Date: The Sabillasville Elementary School PTO will host a 50th Anniversary Celebration on Wednesday, November 18, 2015, at the school. During school, students will celebrate from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in the auditorium; a community celebration will begin at 6:00 p.m. with Alumni Meet-Up, followed by a celebration at 7:00 p.m. Visit www.education.fcps.org/ses for more information.

by Chris O’Connor

There’s More to Bonnie than Postage Stamps

Sabillasville resident Bonnie DeLauter is a self-described social butterfly who loves to talk.

Many know her as a hard-working employee of the United States Postal Service (USPS), who runs the post office in Cascade and who is a member of St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Sabillasville.

I know about her talkative side. She was the first person to befriend me over a decade ago when transferring my then-second grader to Sabillasville Elementary School. We met many times there to join our daughters at lunch. Early on, Bonnie’s gift of gab must have left me looking a bit bewildered while she attempted to fill me in on the lay of the land. Bonnie’s late husband, Steve, noticed the bemused expression on my face. He glanced at me and said, “Confusin’ ain’t it?” I chuckled, but Bonnie didn’t miss a beat and continued to educate me on what to expect in the days to come.

Bonnie and Steve met when she was just fourteen. They dated for close to a decade before marrying in 1982. She worked as a bus driver before taking the civil service exam some thirty years ago and was hired by the USPS, working at post offices ranging from rural post offices on the other side of Hagerstown to Libertytown.

Her only sister, Linda, passed away in 2001, but Bonnie treasures and appreciates the company of her Aunt Virginia in Thurmont, and her aunt and uncle, Dorothy and Richard Valentine of Emmitsburg.

Her husband, Steve, worked for a couple of years in the late 1970s for the Western Maryland/Chessie Railroad, until he turned his full attention to the family farm in Sabillasville, producing grains, hay, fruit, and raising cattle until his passing in 2004. Bonnie and her still young daughter, Karen, returned to her parents place, Donald Harbaugh and her late mom Betty Green Harbaugh’s Sabillasville farm. They resided with her dad, Donald, until building a house on the home place in April 2006.

Bonnie is active in a variety of organizations, including the Ladies Auxiliary of American Legion Cascade Post 239, of which she is obviously proud. The Legion sponsors many activities to raise money for Veterans who have served our country and philanthropic organizations such as the Patty Pollatos Fund, a non-profit that helps to financially benefit individuals and families in need while in the throes of devastating illnesses and injuries.

One upcoming fundraiser is a gun raffle on September 26. Bonnie helps out by selling tickets to the raffle and lending a hand the day before with food preparation. Raffle tickets are available to the public for $10.00, and can be obtained from Bonnie at the Cascade Post Office or the Legion Hall on McAfee Hill Road.

The Legion’s Mr. and Mrs. Cascade event is being held on October 10 (Colorfest weekend). The light-hearted occasion finds men and women dressed as the opposite sex, participating in a talent showcase. Bonnie’s description of past contests made the coronation sound like more fun than a barrel of monkeys. It is open to the public.

Local businesses donate products, time, and talents for the Spa Day on October 18, which is also a public event. One can enjoy a massage, makeup, manicure, and hair styling. A donation to the Legion is welcomed and ultimately benefits someone in need, especially those who have honored us with their service.

The wide-reaching significance of the Legion to Veterans and residents of the Cascade area is hard to quantify, but Bonnie conveys a perspective that hints at the reach of the Legion’s helping hand. Profits benefit Veterans of our Armed Forces, as well as children for a back-to-school get-together. At Christmas, members attempt to fulfill the wishes of children at Cascade Elementary, whose families might find purchasing a particular gift unaffordable.

Bonnie recounted many touching, heart-warming deeds accomplished by the Legion’s members, which I hope to recount in a future column.

Some years ago, I was a beneficiary of the Legion’s generosity after breaking my leg and receiving a loaner wheelchair from them, thanks to Bonnie’s intervention on my behalf.

She is also a member the Ladies Auxiliary of South Mountain Rod and Gun Club, located on Rt. 77 in Smithsburg, which opens its doors to non-members during holiday celebrations throughout the year.

One tradition Bonnie revisits is cruising to her childhood stomping grounds in Rocky Ridge, helping out wherever needed at the annual Rocky Ridge Carnival. It also affords her the opportunity to chat with friends she can’t see as frequently as she’d like.

Another of her local haunts is Blue Ridge Sportsmen’s Association in Fairfield, Pennsylvania, where she plays shuffleboard and enjoys a meal and the camaraderie of friends.

Travel is another of Bonnie’s favorite pursuits, though she bemoans the fact that it’s been more than a few years since she has been able to get away. She loves visiting friends in Florida, Oklahoma, and Ohio, while squeezing in one of her favorite spectator sports: bull riding. There’s been a Caribbean cruise or two, and horseback riding at John Flaugher’s place in Florida. John was a great friend to Bonnie’s husband, Steve, and is Karen’s godfather.

Bonnie’s benevolent nature, sense of humor, and easy laugh is testament to her favorite saying, “Life is what you make it.”

Deb Spalding

Yes, the Kuhns and the Wolfes were out for the Foxville School Reunion on May 17, 2015, at the school house. So were the Brandenburgs, Buhrmans, Hurleys, Willards, Delauters, Klines, and Clines, in addition to members of other homestead mountain families as students of the former Foxville School reminisced while enjoying a lunch of homemade fare. “The reunion has been held since 1986, and since that first gathering, 86 people who were present at the first reunion have passed away,” said reunion coordinator, Don Hurley.

Students shared stories about arriving early to fire up the wood stove; cutting firewood at the school to use when coal rations ran out; sneaky boys putting pencils in a girl’s braids; playing on a big log in the woods behind the school house; and shimmying out a window and running home to avoid staying after school (there was no mention of the escape the next day).

Before the Foxville School was built in 1924, North Franklin School and East Franklin School served smaller groups of school children in the Foxville area. The current Foxville School building was used until June 1961. It was planned that the school would close earlier but there was much organized resistance to the idea. When it finally closed, the entire student body consisting of about 60 students was transferred to Wolfsville.  At that time, Mr. Marshall Leatherman retired from the principalship and Mr. Kenneth Frushour was assigned as principal. Mrs. Virginia K. Draper was assigned as a sixth grade teacher, Mrs. Judith (King) Raun was assigned as a new first grade teacher, and Miss Joan Lawyer (now Spalding) was assigned as a new third grade teacher.

The students from Foxville continued to attend the Wolfsville School until the new Sabillasville Elementary School was built and occupied in September, 1965. Sabillasville Elementary School will celebrate its 50th anniversary this year with special activities this fall. The anniversary will also be honored at the opening ceremonies of the Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show in September.

For more information about the Foxville School Reunion, please call 301-416-0798 or 301-416-0185.

DSC_0493

This photo was taken in the “Little” room of the school where grades 1, 2, and 3 were taught. Pictured left to right front row are Beverley (Hurley) Kolb, Margaret (Buhrman) Sigler, Ethel (Hurley) Fitzgerald, Betty Willard (former teacher at the school), Elva (Weagley) Schultz, Jane (Hayes) Draper, Janet (Wolfe) Monn, Jean (Wolfe) Cline; 2nd row, Diane (Hessong) Vaughn, Carolyn (Brandenburg) Fishack, Ruth “Pat” Willard, Nancy (Hurley) Glass, Evangeline (Willard) Brown, Judy (Kline) Willard, Patty (Jacobs) Willard, Genevieve Delauter, Paul Delauter; 3rd row, Dot McAfee, Henry Buhrman, Sara (Testerman) Hurley, Clarence Lee Willard, Rob McAfee, Don Hurley, Harold “Bill” Brandenburg, Eugene Brandenburg, Karl E. Brandenburg, Rayetta (Willard) Brown, Austin  “Ott” Wolfe, Richard Willard, Jim Kuhn, Ken Cline, and Walter Lantz, Jr.

Photo by Deb Spalding

Foxville School — 1948 or 1949

The photo was taken on the front steps of the Foxville School.

Foxville School Reunion - 1948 or 1949

First row: Cyrus Brown, Gary Kendall, Unknown, Merle Toms, Dick Abraham, Clifton Pryor, Bonnie Kuhn, Joan Fox (?); 2nd row: Kenny or Paul Smith (brothers), Charles Linton, Richard Toms, John Stottlemyer, Leah Willard (also known as Leah (Wolfe), Kay Swope; 3rd row: Bob Testerman, Robert Duncan, Ralph Hurley, Arthur Brandenburg, Frankie Linton; 4th row: Joan Draper, Beverley Hurley, Harold Willard, Leon DeLauter, Josephine Buhrman, Dorothy Stottlemyer, Betty Pryor, Margaret Kuhn; 5th row: Ronald Swope, Julia Brandenburg, Roberta Hauver, Imogene Brown, and Gary Swope.

James Rada, Jr.

Statewide, the biggest takeaway from the November 4, 2014, election was the win of Republican Larry Hogan in a heavily Democratic state to become the next governor of Maryland. Frederick County’s election was a historic one, as representatives were selected for the county’s new form of government.

Voter turnout in the county was 51.36 percent. Among the local voting precincts, voter turnout ranged from 41.06 percent at Thurmont Middle School to 51.78 percent at Woodsboro Elementary School.

The new county officers will be sworn in on December 1, 2014.

Jan Gardner (D) defeated Blaine Young (R) to become the first Frederick County Executive. Gardner won 53.82 percent of the vote, while Young finished with 45.82 percent. Although Gardner had a strong victory overall, she did not win in any of the local districts. Her best showing was at the Woodsboro Elementary polls, where she won 44.59 percent of the vote.

Gardner, who will oversee county operations, establish policies, and propose budgets, will be working with a majority Republican county council. The Republican candidates won four of the seven seats, including the two at-large seats and the District 5 seat. The Council’s job is to initiate legislation for Frederick County. It meets for only forty-five days each year.

Kirby Delauter (R) defeated Mark Long (D), 54.72 percent to 45.13 percent, to win the District 5 seat. Delauter won a majority of votes at all the local polling places, including 67.89 percent of the votes cast at Sabillasville Elementary School.

Republicans Billy Shreve and Bud Otis defeated Democrats Susan Jessee and Linda Norris for the two at-large county council seats. The Republicans also won their contests at all of the local polling places.

Incumbent Sheriff Chuck Jenkins (R) easily won re-election over Karl Bickel (D), 62.79 percent to 37.06 percent. Jenkins performed even stronger locally, where he won between 75 to 83 percent of the vote, depending on the polling place.

Four seats on the Frederick County Board of Education were open in this election. Liz Barrett (15.52 percent), Brad Young (14.20 percent), Colleen Cusimano (13.55 percent), and April Miller (12.92 percent) were the top vote getters.

For the District 4 State Senator seat, Michael Hough (R) won 66.7 percent of the vote to defeat Dan Rupli (D) who earned 33.08 percent of the vote.

The three seats open for the Maryland House of Delegates in District 4 are also all filled by Republicans. Kelly Schulz (30.89 percent), Kathy Afzali (28.49 percent), and David Vogt, III (24.69 percent) defeated Democrat Gene Stanton (15.63 percent). Stanton was the lone Democrat running for the position.

For a complete listing of the 2014 General Election results, including the final results in Frederick County, either by county or polling location, visit the Frederick County Board of Elections web page at www.frederickcountymd.gov/index.aspx. You can also find the official final results when they are posted.

MountainFest Weekend in Sabillasville

by Chris O’Connor

COLUMN mountain fest -Juanita Pfister and daughter OliviaA rather inauspicious opening day of MountainFest at Sabillasville Elementary School in Sabillasville, Maryland, deterred many visitors due to the chilly, misty weather.

Sunday, the overcast skies gave way to sun and warmer temperatures and attendance typical of the decades old annual arts and crafts festival sponsored by the Northwestern Frederick County Civic Association (NFCCA).

The NFCCA headed by President George Kuhn describes the gathering as a unique alternative for artisans and crafters to display their wares in an ideal environment without the crush of crowds and parking fees.  He considers the relaxed country setting a perfect place for friends and neighbors to gather and enjoy local churches’ baked goods, live music, an affordable meal, and ice cream from Antietam Dairy, an ever-welcome fixture at MountainFest.

Robert Eyler of Rocky Ridge provided fare from his food truck on Saturday and Sunday.  The menu included hamburgers, hot dogs, fries, and other items, but he sold out of pit beef and soup both days, a testament to the popularity of Eyler’s chow.

MountainFest is the only fundraiser held by the NFCCA.  It primarily benefits students through the Catoctin feeder school system who choose to apply for scholarships. George, whose duties include vendor registration and assignment of spaces, explained that there are three categories of scholarships, including academic, auto industry, and the lesser known designation for individuals wishing to continue their education.

There were approximately twenty-five exhibitors at the show, including George who had a wide array of antiques and collectibles that he’s found at a variety of sales. He claims no special knowledge, but happily enjoys the quest and how interesting he considers the individual items he finds.

MountainFest draws in crafters and artisans from towns hither and yon.  Jack and Holly Olszewski of Cascade, Maryland, displayed their fossils, crystals, minerals, and massive teeth from the ancient megaladon.

Jerry Stiffler from Wellsville, Pennsylvania, builds distinctive cupboards and shelving fashioned from salvaged antique wood from deserted barns and other buildings slated for demolition.  He strives to learn the age and history of the structure and includes that information with the purchase of each piece.

Another popular draw was hand-crafted jewelry by Deanna Maginnis from Myersville, Maryland, who designs and fabricates her own jewelry from a variety of beads to semi-precious stones, including freshwater pearls to Swarovski crystals.

Sunday, the emerging sun illuminated glistening chrome and shiny paint jobs, highlighting another popular feature of MountainFest, the much anticipated annual car show, founded over thirty years ago by the late Kenny Tressler.

George Kuhn credits the continued success of the car show to current chairman Jason Worth of Sabillasville, who registered 110 antique and classic rides this year. Funds raised from the car show go toward the NFCCA scholarship fund.

Jason, who has helped with the annual car show for six years and been the chairman for three, points out that the show isn’t limited to antique or classic cars, or what car lovers describe as “Detroit Muscle.”  Any car can be entered in the show for a $10.00 fee, which allows the entrant to vote for twenty-five awards and a chance at a variety of door prizes offered by local businesses from Thurmont; Emmitsburg; and Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, who generously provide goods and services.

Jason extends his gratitude to everyone who contributed cash and/or door prizes, the gathering of which involves friends and family who volunteer to visit the local businesses and cites ultimate beneficiaries:  students looking for a financial boost in their respective hopes to further their education with NFCCA scholarships.

Three additional awards included one for the vehicle that traveled the greatest distance, which hailed from Bunker Hill, West Virginia. The Oldest Vehicle award was bestowed on 1927 Ford Model A. Voted Best in Show was a ’69 Chevelle.

A fitting finale to a beautiful Sunday at MountainFest was punctuated by rumbling thunder from the exhaust systems of the cars, a veritable symphony to any car enthusiast’s ears as the participants departed the show grounds.

The descending sun reflected in the cars spotless paint jobs and flashed like lightning as the show cars headed toward the horizon.

For information, contact George Kuhn at 301-241-3997 or Jason Worth at 301-241-4537.